mostraligabue
» » The House of Blue Mangoes: A Novel

ePub The House of Blue Mangoes: A Novel download

by David Davidar

ePub The House of Blue Mangoes: A Novel download
Author:
David Davidar
ISBN13:
978-0060936785
ISBN:
0060936789
Language:
Publisher:
Harper Perennial; Reprint edition (March 4, 2003)
Category:
Subcategory:
Genre Fiction
ePub file:
1186 kb
Fb2 file:
1196 kb
Other formats:
doc mobi txt lit
Rating:
4.7
Votes:
240

Unfortunately, House of Blue Mangoes does not meet this standard. This book by David Davidar traces three generations of a Christian Indian family in southwest India.

Unfortunately, House of Blue Mangoes does not meet this standard. Davidar writes such muddled sentences as: "Michael drove very carefully, but the road was a familiar one, and there was no other vehicle about, so they made good progress as the lonely violence of dawn sweeps across the sky", with vivid imagery. We are given a clear insight into the values, customs, highs and lows of life in a village in which the family head was the leader of the entire community.

The novel brings vividly to life a small corner of India, while offering a stark indictment of colonialism and reflecting with great poignancy on the inexorable social transformations of the subcontinent.

Start by marking The House of Blue Mangoes : A Novel as Want to Read . Details (if other): Cancel. Thanks for telling us about the problem.

Start by marking The House of Blue Mangoes : A Novel as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read. The House of Blue Mangoes : A Novel. by. David J. Davidar.

As time passed, Kannan began to display the sorts of qualities that augured well for the family’s future uncle Aaron, he was tough, co. .

As time passed, Kannan began to display the sorts of qualities that augured well for the family’s future uncle Aaron, he was tough, confident and quite unafraid of taking on challenges. These began quite early in his life, and had a lot to do with his surname. Despite his father’s continued resolve not to single him out for favours, he was inevitably picked on by those who wanted to establish their claim to leadership in the group.

Critical acclaim for The House of Blue Mangoes: ‘The book is huge in scope but intimate in detail. Meenakshi Ganguly, Time

Critical acclaim for The House of Blue Mangoes: ‘The book is huge in scope but intimate in detail. there are some magnificent set pieces’ Elizabeth Grice, Daily Telegraph ‘The House. Meenakshi Ganguly, Time. The House of Blue Mangoes is that rare thing: a deeply intelligent novel that’s also a cracking page-turner, and it’s one of the best books I’ve read in a very long time’. Diana McPartlin, South China Morning Post. I had not read anything so good for a long time. he has produced a masterpiece’.

A gripping family chronicle, The House of Blue Mangoes spans nearly half a century and three generations of the . Kullanıcılar ne diyor? - Eleştiri yazın. Kullanıcı Değerlendirmesi - Robert0333 - LibraryThing.

Books related to The House of Blue Mangoes. More by David Davidar. The Solitude of Emperors.

The House of Blue Mangos is a well told story of three generations of the "Dorai" family in South India, mostly . David Davidar was born in South India into a military family in 1958.

The House of Blue Mangos is a well told story of three generations of the "Dorai" family in South India, mostly in the modern day state of Tamil Nadu, but under the British Raj, the Madras Presidency. The house of blue mangoes. Пользовательский отзыв - Kirkus. He was educated in India and at Harvard and is now publisher of Penguin Canada and based in Toronto. Библиографические данные.

David Davidar remedies that and how! For his novel does for India in general and South India in particular what .

David Davidar remedies that and how! For his novel does for India in general and South India in particular what few novels do - create a rich, beautifully layered world that the reader can sink into for days on end and emerge as if from a dream.

David Davidar is president and publisher of Penguin Canada and also a director on the board of Penguin India, of which he was a founding member

David Davidar is president and publisher of Penguin Canada and also a director on the board of Penguin India, of which he was a founding member. Davidar’s first novel, The House of Blue Mangoes, was published in sixteen countries and was an international bestseller. Sign me up for news about David Davidar. Books by David Davidar.

In 1899, in the south Indian village of Chevathar, Solomon Dorai is contemplating the imminent destruction of his world and everything he holds dear. As the thalaivar, or headman, of Chevathar, he seeks to preserve the village from both catastrophe and change, and the decisions he makes will mark his family for generations to come.

A gripping family chronicle, The House of Blue Mangoes spans nearly half a century and three generations of the Dorai family as they search for their place in a rapidly changing society. The novel brings vividly to life a small corner of India, while offering a stark indictment of colonialism and reflecting with great poignancy on the inexorable social transformations of the subcontinent.

  • "The House of Blue Mangoes" has been hyped as a sensational debut by David Davidar, the CEO of Penguin Publishing in India. The book traces the lives of three generations of Dorais as they try to find their place in the world. Solomon Dorai, the patriarch of the family, must strive hard to keep his town, Chevathar, from erupting into violence as a result of caste disputes. Ultimately, Solomon falls victim to this very evil. Of Solomon�s two sons, Aaron is a hothead whose primary claim to fame is the successful clearing ( in high-jump) of a massive well in Chevathar. The other son, Daniel, is much more worldly-wise and takes care of his family after a successful stint as "vaidyan" (doctor). Daniel�s son, Kannan, chooses to move away from Chevathar and seek his fortunes in the white man�s (read occupiers, the British) tea estates. We see changes that afflict the Dorai clan -- assimilation into foreign cultures and even a "love" marriage in this generation. Finally we learn that even if your average Dorai strays far from Chevathar, he magically hears the call and always comes back "home". Yawn!
    The biggest problem with Blue Mangoes is that the story is so mediocre. In a recent interview, Mr. Davidar mentioned how he wanted to write about all his childhood memories played out in South India. I wish he had stuck to that agenda and written a wonderful memoir of sorts. Instead, what he has done is tried to create a filler story around all his memories. And that is always a dangerous game to play. What�s worse, Davidar has tried to create a "saga" which means he throws everything but the kitchen sink in. You�ve got caste, caste, and more caste. You�ve got dowry, you�ve got oppressive husbands, subservient wives, man-eating tigers, the works. Davidar tries hard to create a panoramic effect but in the end, the book rambles too much. He needs a better editor. Another hindrance that many readers might find annoying is Davidar�s generous use of Tamil words with no translation or lexicon included.
    The one saving grace of "House of Blue Mangoes" is that it is a masaledar, spicy read. It would make a good beach book. But I would borrow my copy from the library. Spend your money on better books.

  • I wanted this book to be as fascinating as the first hundred pages. Certainly all of the elements are present: the family patriarchy, feuding neighbors, an entrenched caste system in precarious balance.
    Three generations of Dorais act out this familial drama, male characters predominant, from Solomon Dorai to his sons Aaron and Daniel, and Daniel's son Kammel. In each generation, at least one son is banished to make his way among strangers. In Daniel's case, because he could not fight to preserve the family's honor, and was sent away with the women and children before the battle that cost the lives of many important Dorai men. Much later, Daniel returns to accept his birthright. But later, Daniel's own son willingly leaves, unable to make peace within the family hierarchy. Yet all roads lead to the Dorai compound, where relatives live together in common purpose, keeping the land intact. In a tribute to Solomon, who first had the dream, Daniel names the enclave The House of Blue Mangoes. Years later, as David lies dying, Kamman returns to assume the role of his father's successor, with the same purpose, the continuation of the family name and property. There is plentiful material to fuel the plot, particularly the political unrest prior to the Partition in 1947.
    There is no question that the British trampled the land and the people, Her Majesty's representatives bloated with their own importance and dreams of Empire. But Davidar's characters are difficult to understand, seeming cutouts before the vast panoply of social change, who only parrot historical facts, often with little interest. I wanted a sense of the people themselves, their passions, dreams and fears, not an explanation like a school primer. For example, Daniel becomes a physician, trained by a charitable benefactor to help the poor and indigent; he passes the clinic on to Daniel. But Daniel makes his fortune on patent medicines and moves back to his home village to establish the family colony, never looking back. Then Kammal, Daniel's son, works on a tea plantation after marrying an inappropriate woman chosen in a romantic stupor, she part Indian, part English. On the English run plantation, Kammal's wife is never accepted, but he toady's to his bosses, believing himself part of their society. In fact, he is their pawn. Kannan deals with his self-concept and particular circumstances in an almost simple-minded fashion. He has no substance, obsequious and self-effacing.
    I have enjoyed many finely written Indian novels, among them The God of Small Things and A Fine Balance, and Cracking India, and love to immerse myself in this country and its history. Unfortunately, House of Blue Mangoes does not meet this standard. Davidar writes such muddled sentences as: "Michael drove very carefully, but the road was a familiar one, and there was no other vehicle about, so they made good progress." Yet the first chapter begins: "...as the lonely violence of dawn sweeps across the sky", with vivid imagery. Perhaps the story just got away from him, but in the final third of the novel the wooden dialog of the British literally put me into a stupor, bludgeoned by idiotic conversations. Because of Davidar's descriptive and poetic abilities, I believe this author has the talent to write about what he knows so well. All the stories and history are locked within him, perhaps more approachable on a smaller scale or more intimate characterization.

  • I found this novel fairly non-compelling. It was hard to even get through the first quarter, and I was two thirds through before it became very interesting. If I wasn't obligated to read it for my book club, I would have stopped long before I finished. I learned a little about Indian culture and history, but not much. There are too many other books out there to bother with this one.

  • Well written book with cats in the spotlight main characters. Reccomended for fans of Warriors.

  • This book by David Davidar traces three generations of a Christian Indian family in southwest India. We are given a clear insight into the values, customs, highs and lows of life in a village in which the family head was the leader of the entire community. As such, he was constantly threatened by a non-Christian Indian community across the river from his.
    We learn of the role of women over these three generations - how it changed in many instances and remainded the same in others; how the role of sons in the family could effect total change if the balance was altered; how native Indians were treated by the English raj - in this book one example is the status of the third generation son - married to an Anglo-Indian wife - who goes to a management job in an Indian tea plantation owned and run by Englishmen. Indian legend and history are both treated in this book which gives us a close look into the life of past generations of Indians as they try to forge their identity and independence. An excellent read for those who wish to "feel" what India was, and perhaps, still is.

  • I read this book in two days. It was fascinating and altho it is fiction it is historically accurate. I loved the characters and the descriptive passages came alive for me.

  • A good book

  • I love these books and hope for more.