mostraligabue
» » The Persian Boy

ePub The Persian Boy download

by Mary Renault

ePub The Persian Boy download
Author:
Mary Renault
ISBN13:
978-0140038408
ISBN:
014003840X
Language:
Publisher:
Bantam Book; 2nd edition (1974)
Category:
Subcategory:
Genre Fiction
ePub file:
1678 kb
Fb2 file:
1975 kb
Other formats:
azw docx rtf doc
Rating:
4.6
Votes:
580

The Persian Boy is a 1972 historical novel written by Mary Renault and narrated by Bagoas, a young Persian from an aristocratic family who is captured by his father's enemies, castrated.

Eventually he becomes the lover and most faithful servant of Alexander the Great, who overthrew Darius and captured the Persian Empire

The Persian Boy" was probably a better novel 40 years ago. I'm not sure if anybody will be interested in reading it in another 50 years.

The Persian Boy" was probably a better novel 40 years ago. But it has an important place in the history of gay literature and Mary Renault is an excellent writer of this genre.

The Persian Boy book. At its heart, The Persian Boy is a love story, and it too is indeed a powerful one. This book is Mary Renault's second voyage into the life of Alexander the Great, and takes place historically from when he becomes king of Macedon, to his untimely death. Mary Renault takes an interesting approach to telling this story however, and the entire book is written from the point of view of Bagoas, The "Persian Bo.

Showing 22 distinct works. The Persian Boy (Alexander the Great, by. Mary Renault.

In The Persian Boy, we meet him six years later and follow him to his death in a superbly moving narrative told by his young lover and companion, Bagoas, a real historical person, who may well have influenced history. For the beautiful slave-boy Bagoas, bought plaything of Darius the Persian King, the invader's brilliant victories are at first mere palace rumor. Then, at the battle of Gaugamela, the empire crumbles about its ill-fated, ineffectual ruler.

MARY RENAULT'S IS A SPECIAL BRAND OF HISTORICAL FICTION, at once imaginative, dramatic, seductive . The difficulty in dealing with Alexander in a work of fiction.

MARY RENAULT'S IS A SPECIAL BRAND OF HISTORICAL FICTION, at once imaginative, dramatic, seductive, and scrupulous. An interplay of passion and intelligence. is in this book superbly overcome: by using Bagoas, his lover, as the reader's eyes, she gets enough distance from Alexander to make him utterly real, human and superhuman at once, the incarnation of the spirit of the ancient world.

The Persian Boy is the second volume of the Novels of Alexander the Great trilogy, which also includes Fire from . Mary Renault is a shining light to both historical novelists and their readers

The Persian Boy is the second volume of the Novels of Alexander the Great trilogy, which also includes Fire from Heaven and Funeral Games. This ebook features an illustrated biography of Mary Renault including rare images of the author. Mary Renault is a shining light to both historical novelists and their readers

At night, he limped now and then when he forgot, but stopped himself next moment.

At night, he limped now and then when he forgot, but stopped himself next moment h things on the spot) and led the assault himself. Before he’d crossed, so many had pressed up to be fighting next him, that the bridge broke in the middle. I died many deaths, before they scrambled out from the rubble below, and I saw his white-winged helmet

We’re dedicated to reader privacy so we never track you.

The new monumental bestseller! a towering re-creation of the ancient world of Alexander the Great.
  • The book discussion group at the LGBT Center in NYC read this novel in September 2015. As expected, consensus on the novel was split. About half the readers loved the book and were captivated by this romantic story. And the other half liked it, but thought that it was too long and old fashioned.

    A couple of themes emerged. We were fascinated by the first-person narration from the point of view of a young eunuch. While most stories center around Alexander's much better known life-long lover Hephaistion, Mary selected Bagoas to tell this story. This is a fascinating choice since it allows her to be especially creative (and even a bit outlandish) in presenting the attractive Alex and Bagoas' intimate relationship, even if all that perfection and vaguely described sex does get to be a bit grating by the end.

    We discussed the role of captives several times. Bagoas is essentially a slave to the Macedonian king. To survive, he adopts the strategy of most successful captives of subjugated peoples: He forgets the past and his former high position and concentrates on day-to-day concerns and marches forward, doing what he can to thrive under the current circumstances. By doing this, he leads a prosperous life with a very powerful man.

    The modern concept of "love" turns the story into a romance and even melodrama at times. But this "love" that Bagoas describes would have been a completely alien concept to the actual historical characters. "Romantic love" between men didn't exist (this concept is a much later creation of the middle ages as part of the "courtly love" tradition), and even Alexander marries to consolidate his holdings and bear an heir, rather than because he loves Roxane. Later, when Alexander selects brides (and even paying for dowries) for all his officers, everyone considers this a brilliant idea - love wasn't involved. Bagoas' love for Alex makes for a romantic novel, but probably not very accurate.

    Finally, Mary has given us a clever story in the form of a historical novel. It's full of research and actual events, packed with details of ancient life and travels. I liked it for the first 100+ pages, then got bogged down with the forgettable names, the long campaigns, the unclear places, the not-very-interesting court intrigues, and the ancient politics. Both Alexander and Bagoas are too perfect. By the time they get to the wars in India, I really didn't care very much and just plowed through to the end, which was very satisfying.

    Looking at the reviews on Amazon, an awful lot of guys consider this their favorite novel. I'm guessing that most of these readers have very fond memories of reading "The Persian Boy" when they didn't have many choices for positive gay characters, or even much gay literature from which to select. It was an early novel (1972) to have an openly gay character who isn't punished for his sexuality and actually prospers with his lover. There's no great coming-out trauma for Alexander, Hephaistion, or Bagoas, and it's presented as a great love story, so in some ways it seems very modern and even post-gay. But then that old fashioned, plodding, and high-British tone sets in and we're stuck with a long and tedious novel with a few characters we don't care much about.

    "The Persian Boy" was probably a better novel 40 years ago. I'm not sure if anybody will be interested in reading it in another 50 years. But it has an important place in the history of gay literature and Mary Renault is an excellent writer of this genre. Your enjoyment of it will depend on your love of long historical novels, regardless of how imaginative or well written they are.

  • Wonderful book told from the perspective of a oft ignored historical character who may have known the great conqueror as well as anyone. Mary Renault's writing is always sublime and this book is no different in that regard from it's predecessor, "Fire From Heaven."

  • If you are looking for an exciting story, you can't go wrong with Alexander biographies and stories. Whether he is portrayed evil or good, his life was full of energy and events that simply amaze you. But of all the books I've read about him, this book is the one that captured my mind the most.
    First, she starts out with Bagoas's boyhood. Doing so she is successful in educating her reader about Persian people and their culture/customs, the environment and the way it was back then, to prepare us for deeper understanding of the future events. The first one-third of the book is about Bagoas's boyhood, mostly about his court life, which tells what had happened inside the Persian Empire before Alexander actually came into scene. This is a very smart start, because by the time Darius was killed, and his murderer Bessus was arrested by Alexander and executed, with nose and ears cut off, the reader is well prepared to understand why it had to be done that way. She also explains well the reason why Alexander became so Persianized, which created resentments and mutinies and lots of problems. Mary Renaults does the best job in making the reader understand this crucial point which cast shadow over him until he died.
    As for homosexuality and the love scenes, it is not as disturbing, since it is not graphic at all. Transparent, clean, and good taste.
    She also brings other characters to life. All that she mentions by their names, the reader will know what kind of person he/she was. Whether her portrayal of Alexander and the way she used the well-known events to develop the characters and story are factual or not, she will convince you effortlessly. Remarkable work, well-studied, well-reasoned, well-developed. You will not be able to put it down once you open the first page.