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by Junot Díaz

ePub The Brief Wondrous Life of Oscar Wao download
Author:
Junot Díaz
ISBN13:
978-1594483295
ISBN:
1594483299
Language:
Publisher:
Riverhead Books; Reprint edition (September 2, 2008)
Category:
Subcategory:
Genre Fiction
ePub file:
1439 kb
Fb2 file:
1192 kb
Other formats:
rtf doc azw lrf
Rating:
4.6
Votes:
399

The Brief Wondrous Life of Oscar Wao (2007) is a novel written by Dominican American author Junot Díaz.

The Brief Wondrous Life of Oscar Wao (2007) is a novel written by Dominican American author Junot Díaz. Although a work of fiction, the novel is set in New Jersey in the United States, where Díaz was raised, and it deals with the Dominican Republic experience under dictator Rafael Trujillo

And except for one period early in his life, dude never had much luck with the females (how very un-Dominican of him).

Junot Díaz THE BRIEF WONDROUS LIFE OF OSCAR WAO PART I They say it came first from Africa, carried in the screams of the enslaved; that it was the death bane of the Taínos, uttered just as one world perished and another began; that it was a demon drawn into Creation through the nightmare door that was cracked open in the Antilles. A couple weeks ago, while I was finishing this book, I posted the thread fukú on the DRI forum, just out of curiosity. And except for one period early in his life, dude never had much luck with the females (how very un-Dominican of him).

Now that Díaz's second book, a novel called The Brief Wondrous Life of Oscar Wao, has finally arrived, younger writers will find that the bar. And some older writers-we know who we are-might want to think about stepping up their game

Now that Díaz's second book, a novel called The Brief Wondrous Life of Oscar Wao, has finally arrived, younger writers will find that the bar. And some older writers-we know who we are-might want to think about stepping up their game. If Donald Barthelme had lived to read Díaz, he surely would have been delighted to discover an intellectual and linguistic omnivore who could have taught even him a move or tw. -Newsweek.

You root for him the entire length of the book but know deep in your heart The Brief Wondrous Life of Oscar Wao by Junot Díaz is pure genius storytelling at its core. This was a Book Club choice that had me a little nervous but in the end had me tightly strapped in for the ride.

Junot Díaz’s wondrous first novel is so original it can only be described as Mario Vargas Llosa meets Star Trek meets . Continue reading the main story.

Junot Díaz’s wondrous first novel is so original it can only be described as Mario Vargas Llosa meets Star Trek meets David Foster Wallace meets Kanye West. Junot Díaz’s Brief Wondrous Life of Oscar Wao is a wondrous, not-so-brief first novel that is so original it can only be described as Mario Vargas Llosa meets Star Trek meets David Foster Wallace meets Kanye West.

Other Books Related to The Brief Wondrous Life of Oscar Wa.

Other Books Related to The Brief Wondrous Life of Oscar Wao. The Brief Wondrous Life of Oscar Wao takes the form of a historical biography, complete with footnotes and dates on the chapters. However, it is also a deeply personal story dealing with issues of race and immigration in modern day America, similar to works such as Adichie’s Americanah or Lahiri’s The Namesake. Alter Ego. Yunior, the narrator of Oscar Wao, is also the main character of Diaz’s previous novel Drown and his later collection of short stories, This is How You Lose Her. Díaz has called Yunior a al figure.

Díaz immerses us in the tumultuous life of Oscar and the history of the family at large . A true literary triumph, The Brief Wondrous Life of Oscar Wao confirms Junot Díaz as one of the best and most exciting voices of our time.

Díaz immerses us in the tumultuous life of Oscar and the history of the family at large, rendering with genuine warmth and dazzling energy, humor, and insight the Dominican-American experience, and, ultimately, the endless human capacity to persevere in the face of heartbreak and loss. To read this book, upload an EPUB or FB2 file to Bookmate.

Christopher Tayler is impressed by Junot Díaz's ingenious first novel, The Brief Wondrous Life of Oscar Wa. Junot Díaz's first book, Drown (1996), detailed the lives of children in the Dominican Republic and, later, of young men and their difficult parents in New Jersey's immigrant ghettoes.

Christopher Tayler is impressed by Junot Díaz's ingenious first novel, The Brief Wondrous Life of Oscar Wao. Christopher Tayler. When first published, it was widely seen as marking the arrival of a young writer to be reckoned with. But there was less agreement about what kind of writer Díaz was. Although it was laid out as a story collection, Drown wasn't billed as such by its publishers.

Encapsulating Dominican-American history, The Brief Wondrous Life of Oscar Wao opens our eyes to an astonishing .

Encapsulating Dominican-American history, The Brief Wondrous Life of Oscar Wao opens our eyes to an astonishing vision of the contemporary American experience and explores the endless human capacity to persevere-and risk it all-in the name of love.

Winner of: The Pulitzer Prize The National Book Critics Circle Award The Anisfield-Wolf Book Award The Jon Sargent, Sr. First Novel Prize A Time Magazine #1 Fiction Book of the Year One of the best books of 2007 according to: The New York TimesSan Francisco Chronicle, New York Magazine, Entertainment Weekly, The Boston Globe, Los Angeles Times, The Washington Post, People, The Village Voice, Time Out New York, Salon, Baltimore City Paper, The Christian Science Monitor, Booklist, Library Journal, Publishers Weekly, New York Public Library, and many more... Nominated as one of America’s best-loved novels by PBS’s The Great American ReadOscar is a sweet but disastrously overweight ghetto nerd who—from the New Jersey home he shares with his old world mother and rebellious sister—dreams of becoming the Dominican J.R.R. Tolkien and, most of all, finding love. But Oscar may never get what he wants. Blame the fukú—a curse that has haunted Oscar’s family for generations, following them on their epic journey from Santo Domingo to the USA. Encapsulating Dominican-American history, The Brief Wondrous Life of Oscar Wao opens our eyes to an astonishing vision of the contemporary American experience and explores the endless human capacity to persevere—and risk it all—in the name of love.

  • Pros: For me, this book somehow manages to embody that elusive “magical realism” genre that so many authors have attempted to capture since Gabriel Garcia Marquez coined the category with “One Hundred Years of Solitude.” The characters are real and flawed and complex, the history is rich, and the story sucked me in immediately. This is honestly one of the best books I have read in the past few years. I have given it as a gift to multiple people, and they have had nothing but good things to say about it.

    Cons: Don’t buy the Kindle edition. You need the hard-copy with the footnotes right on the page for you to read right as they come up in the book. There are a lot of footnotes, and they’re 100% needed to fully enjoy/understand the book.

  • Another book which, but for my office's book club, I'd never have even heard of, let alone read: and which I'm terribly glad I did. (I'm also terribly glad I bought a used copy, but that's another issue.)

    What we have here, is the story of a nerd - a fat (incredibly fat), ugly, intellectual, verbose nerd whose parents (Dad left when Oscar was but a wee thing) came from the Dominican Republic but who grows up in Paterson, New Jersey, and who dreams of just two things: love (ideally including the physical sort) and becoming the Dominican Tolkien.

    He is, as you might expect, a rather frustrated young man.

    Whole sections of the book, though, are not directly about Oscar, but about his family: his mama, Belicia De Leon (nee Cabral), the child of a cursed family; his sister Lola; Beli's father Abelard, who fell afoul of Trujillo and met the end that tended to meet such afoul-fallers. Perhaps a third of the book is directly about Oscar de Leon (who acquires the nickname Wao when some Domincan homies apparently have never heard of, and cannot correctly pronounce, Wilde).

    It's written, mostly, in a brilliant English, but with large quantities of Spanish, Dominican Spanish slang, and I don't know what-all else. (I learned a number of Spanish words during the course of the book, some of which are not for use in polite company. Also the N-word pops up far more often than a gringo blanco like myself is comfortable with.)

    Most of the story is narrated by Díaz's stand-in, a Dominico called Yunior, which raises questions of how he knows some of the things he seems to know. Indeed, the final chapter reads to me as something tacked on by Yunior to give Oscar a bit of a happy ending. Your take on this may vary.

    Anyway, a lot of the book takes place in the Dominican Republic of Trujillo and his successors; the climax occurs during the unacknowledged occupation of the DR by America in the '80s; and it would be incredibly grim if it were not also incredibly funny. I can't decide whether it's a funny book that happens to be sad, or a sad book that happens to be funny. It's funny that way.

    What propels the story more than Yunior's voice is the characters. They sparkle with life even when terrible things are happening to them, and they change, both as time passes, and as we get to know them better. (Mama Beli, as we first see her through Oscar's then Lola's eyes, seems like a terrible person; then we learn her story and everything just shifts.)

    It is a terrible, a tragic story with the inevitability that makes a tragedy tragic and not merely bathetic. You won't go far wrong picking it up - from a library, or a used book emporium, or some such, please.

  • This book was easily one of the best I read this year. Its blend of cultural history, 80's nerdery, mystical curses, and romanticism create a relatable family history. My family is Cuban and this family history was so reminiscent of my own. It is hard not to sympathize with Oscar and his family. Oscar is the perfect pure soul who's goal is something we all strive for love and acceptance.

    If you are a fan of magical realism and cultural diverse stories definitely give this a try. If you have ever felt like an outcast please give this a try.

  • More than the story of Oscar --an obese, bullied, comic book-loving, fantasy role-playing nerd on a desperate mission to lose his virginity-- this is the story of a Dominican family's fukú: a potent curse said to have been cast on Oscar's grandfather Abelard by the Dominican dictator himself, Rafael Leónidas Trujillo. A fukú may affect generations, until someone along the line manages to find the right zafa to break the spell.

    In a combination of Spanglish, slang, and the occasional made-up expression, Junot Díaz effectively captures the spirit and evolved identity of a transplanted Latin American family onto U.S. culture. It touches upon the struggle of a society affected by oppressive power, and the resilience and determination needed in their diaspora. As a native Hispanic, I wonder if and how non-Spanish speakers get to fully understand this book, because it's written not only in Spanish but in Spanish (untranslateable) slang. Also, as a native Hispanic, I was annoyed at the multiple grammatical and spelling errors in Spanish. Couldn't Diaz have found a bilingual editor?

    The book's chapters alternatively tell the story of Oscar and his immediate family members. Narrated by Yunior, Lola's on-again, off-again boyfriend, we learn of the De León clan's woes and how fukú, inevitably, catches up with Oscar. From the title we are aware that Oscar will die, but that news does not lessen our sorrow because by then we are despairingly rooting for his success. Oscar's unquenchable thirst for love is heart-wrenching because it is snubbed by every female he encounters. "His affection --that gravitational mass of love, fear, longing, desire, and lust that he directed at any and every girl in the vicinity without regard to looks, age, or availability-- broke his heart [and ours] each and every day". His family members and their struggles also break our hearts in their own struggles to survive their personal hell.

    As for the dose of Dominican history included in the book, I am so curious about Trujillo now that I will follow with Julia Alvarez's "In the time of the butterflies" and Mario Vargas Llosa's "La fiesta del chivo". Intense!