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ePub Glass House: A Novel download

by Christine Wiltz

ePub Glass House: A Novel download
Author:
Christine Wiltz
ISBN13:
978-0807118641
ISBN:
0807118648
Language:
Publisher:
Louisiana State Univ Pr; First Edition edition (January 1, 1994)
Category:
Subcategory:
Genre Fiction
ePub file:
1154 kb
Fb2 file:
1885 kb
Other formats:
lit lrf azw lrf
Rating:
4.6
Votes:
179

Glass House is a complex story that weaves systemic and racial oppression, multiple civil rights violations, romance and drama together into one great read. this book is a masterpiece

Glass House is a complex story that weaves systemic and racial oppression, multiple civil rights violations, romance and drama together into one great read. this book is a masterpiece.

Glass House: A Novel. A perfect novel that accomplishes what Christine Wiltz does so well: it describes the ineffable spirit of New Orleans-all of it: the beautiful, the tragic, the proud, and the shameful. 0807126837 (ISBN13: 9780807126837).

Glass house : a novel. It is in this great old Victorian house that she encounters a childhood friend she had been forbidden to associate with, Burgess Monroe, the son of her aunt's housekeeper. She is drawn to this now powerful and mysterious man, even though she senses that he may hold dangerous secrets. At the same time, Thea is renewing friendships with her old high-school crowd: Bobby Buchanan, a former boyfriend who is still in love with her, and Lyle and Sandy Hindermann, wealthy blue-bloods.

In memory of Noel Tsai. An old man in the housing project had died in his sleep and was found with his mouth wide open, one last gasp, one final effort to delay a journey into the unknown

In memory of Noel Tsai. An old man in the housing project had died in his sleep and was found with his mouth wide open, one last gasp, one final effort to delay a journey into the unknown. But Delzora had never seen such an expression as was on Althea Dumondville's face. There was no way to describe it except smug.

I was lured to read this book because of the setting- New Orleans. Christine Wiltz does a fine job of depicting the fear, rage and connectedness held by the characters. Thea returns to New Orleans after a ten year absence and discovers a different atmosphere in the city while trying to come to grips with her life.

A novel inspired by the true story of a lone policeman who was killed at the edge of one of the most dangerous housing projects in New Orleans Thea Tamborella returns to New Orleans after a ten-year absence to find the city of her birth changed, still a place of deep contradictions, . .

A novel inspired by the true story of a lone policeman who was killed at the edge of one of the most dangerous housing projects in New Orleans Thea Tamborella returns to New Orleans after a ten-year absence to find the city of her birth changed, still a place of deep contradictions, a sensuous blend of religion, tradition, bonhomie, and decadence, but. now caught in a web of fear caused by bad economic times, crime, and racial unrest. Burgess Monroe is the drug kingpin of the Convent Street Housing Project.

Wiltz's careers as mystery writer and TV documentarian influence this sociology-heavy novel, first published . A reluctant southerner, Wiltz's female protagonist returns to her native New Orleans when she inherits a family home.

Wiltz's careers as mystery writer and TV documentarian influence this sociology-heavy novel, first published in 1994, which was inspired by the shooting of a New Orleans policeman in 1980, and its racially charged aftermath. But the uneasily integrated city disturbs her greatly, and the liberal-minded woman finds herself mired in fear and tension.

A phone call at midnight. A cocktail lounge on New Orleans's West Bank. ISBN 9780807118641 (978-0-8071-1864-1) Hardcover, Louisiana State Univ Pr, 1994. Find signed collectible books: 'Glass House: A Novel'. Intersection, New Orleans. by Anne Gisleson, Andrei Codrescu, Ken Foster, Lolis Eric Elie, Ed Skoog, Andy Young, Christine Wiltz, Peter Cooley, Wells Tower, Patty Friedmann. ISBN 9780977768103 (978-777681-0-3) Softcover, Press Street, 2006

Christine Wiltz has written five books: a detective trilogy - The Killing Circle, A Diamond Before You Die, and The Emerald Lizard; a novel, Glass House; and a biography, The Last Madam: A Life in the New Orleans Underworld

Christine Wiltz has written five books: a detective trilogy - The Killing Circle, A Diamond Before You Die, and The Emerald Lizard; a novel, Glass House; and a biography, The Last Madam: A Life in the New Orleans Underworld. All of her books are set in New Orleans, where she was born and still lives.

When Thea Tamborella returns to New Orleans after a ten-year absence, she finds the city of her birth changed, still a place of deep contradictions, a sensuous blend of religion, tradition, bonhomie, and decadence, but now caught in a web of fear caused by bad economic times, crime, and racial unrest. Many residents have sought to avoid the city's problems by fleeing to the suburbs. The wealthy who have remained in the inner city hide behind the walls of homes protected by elaborate security systems. The poor live in decaying neighborhoods and in tenements taken over by drug dealers. Fear of race riots following the murder of a white policeman and the subsequent police terrorization of the all-black housing project where he was killed are dividing the city even further.Thea herself learned the meaning of fear when her life was uprooted after the murder of her parents in their grocery store. She left New Orleans when she grew up but returns there to claim the Garden District mansion she has inherited from her aunt. It is in this great old Victorian house that she encounters a childhood friend she had been forbidden to associate with, Burgess Monroe, the son of her aunt's housekeeper. She is drawn to this now powerful and mysterious man, even though she senses that he may hold dangerous secrets.At the same time, Thea is renewing friendships with her old high-school crowd: Bobby Buchanan, a former boyfriend who is still in love with her, and Lyle and Sandy Hindermann, wealthy blue-bloods. Like many other New Orleanians, Lyle and some of his circle are carrying guns, arming themselves against their perceived enemies. But Lyle has gone one step further: he has become a reserve policeman and a fanatic about law and order. Caught up in the hunt for his fellow officer's killer, he follows a trail that leads him to Burgess' friend Dexter and Dexter's girlfriend, Sherree Morganza, an out-of-work stripper and single mother. It is a case of mistaken identity that ends with brutal and senseless death.Thea, overwhelmed by the violence and mistrust that swirl around her, torn by conflicting passions, finally must come to terms with her own life: with the murder of her parents, with her attraction to Burgess, and ultimately, with a growing conviction that she knows who the real enemy is.
  • Glass House is a complex story that weaves systemic and racial oppression, multiple civil rights violations, romance and drama together into one great read. If the book sounds ambitious in its complexity, know that Christine Wiltz pulled it off & more...this book is a masterpiece. The book is an accurate portrayal of the tension that exists between those who have inherited wealth and those who live in poverty and without hope while they serve the privileged, surviving in sub-standard and brutal living conditions as best they can.

    If it sounds like a story that's set in India or somewhere else besides the United States you're privileged. Not that there's anything wrong with being privileged, as Chris Wiltz shows, but people who have resources others lack also have a duty as a human being to use their privileged status and resources to advocate for better living conditions for those who aren't so lucky, instead of living in fear of losing what they have.

    Fear is never a helpful motivation, and Glass House is permeated with it, just like in real life! I lived in New Orleans in the 1990's and I know that this book is not exaggerating. The writing is sensitive and balanced so that characters on both sides of this economic chasm are shown in their human foibles as well as the things about them that are strong and good.

    The only characters in the book who are perhaps lacking in redeeming qualities are the New Orleans Police Officers who commit crimes and civil rights violations, and this is also an accurate portrayal though one you aren't likely to know about unless you fall into a marginalized category or go out of your way to investigate, or unless you live in New Orleans.

  • Very highly recommended. A sensitive, unflinching look by a New Orleans native at racial relations -- and the stresses on marriages and friendships -- in N.O. amid a crime wave, or a perceived crime wave. It is easy to see why LSU Press chose "Glass House" for its distinguished Voices of the South series. Set in the late 1980s, early 1990s, but applicable to the present day, the novel gives equal "screen time" to relatively privileged whites and less privileged African Americans on both sides of St. Charles Avenue. After a decade away in Massachusetts, Thea, in her 30s, comes back to her hometown and the lovely Garden District house she has inherited from her late aunt. Thea reconnects with old friends of hers and with the strong, admirable black maid who has long worked in the house, and her son, a childhood friend of Thea's, and their relatives who live in a public housing project on the other side of St. Charles, a fictional project called the Convent. Likeable characters (most of them); strong, clear, evocative prose, with lovely descriptions of lush vegetation in the Garden District and the emotions of friendship and love and fear; and (for this reader) a first-time view of life in one of the redbrick housing projects of New Orleans. Readers who have admired the varied, individualized characters (instead of stereotypes) in HBO's "Treme" will appreciate the variety of characters and action in "Glass House." Reviewed by a former resident of New Orleans (and Baton Rouge). --Mark LaFlaur

  • I have read better books. It wasn't much of a quick page turner. Not a bad p!ot so I would consider this a medium exciting book.

  • One of the best novels I have read in a long time. She knows New Orleans and its complex race relations. great character development. No one was totally good or bad, but nuanced, as we all are. I highly recommend this.

  • i was not too enthused with the story line.

  • This is real New Orleans History. Read this and you'll understand how the 'Big Easy' got its reputation.
    A juicy read.

  • Glass house by Chris Wiltz
    She has inherited her aunts house in New Orleans.
    The wealthy are the only ones behind their security systems with fear of low income housing after the murder of a black man.
    Thea renews old friendships. Project life is right there, changed but not.
    I received this book from National Library Service for my BARD (Braille Audio Reading Device).

  • The book starts out as a drama packed with characters from Central Casting, but as the book continues the characters deepen, and the plot develops in unexpected - but wholly earned - ways. In the end, I was glad I'd read it.