mostraligabue
» » The Antiquary (Penguin Classics)

ePub The Antiquary (Penguin Classics) download

by Walter Scott,David Hewitt,David Punter

ePub The Antiquary (Penguin Classics) download
Author:
Walter Scott,David Hewitt,David Punter
ISBN13:
978-0140436525
ISBN:
0140436529
Language:
Publisher:
Penguin Classics (September 1, 1999)
Category:
Subcategory:
Genre Fiction
ePub file:
1480 kb
Fb2 file:
1734 kb
Other formats:
lit docx rtf doc
Rating:
4.7
Votes:
541

The Antiquary (Penguin Classics). Sir Walter Scott was born in Edinburgh in 1771

The Antiquary (Penguin Classics). ISBN-13: 978-0140436525. Sir Walter Scott was born in Edinburgh in 1771. Educated for the law, he obtained the office of sheriff-depute of Selkirkshire in 1799 and in 1806 the office of clerk of session, a post whose duties he fulfilled for some twenty-five years. His lifelong interest in Scottish antiquity and the ballads which recorded Scottish history led him to try his hand at narrative poems of adventure and action.

The Antiquary (1816) is a novel by Sir Walter Scott about several characters including an antiquary .

The Antiquary (1816) is a novel by Sir Walter Scott about several characters including an antiquary: an amateur historian, archaeologist and collector of items of dubious antiquity.

Penguin classics: The antiquary by David Hewitt (Paperback, softback)Title: The antiquary Series .

Read full description. See details and exclusions. item 4 The Antiquary (Penguin Classics) by Scott, Walter Book The Cheap Fast Free Post -The Antiquary (Penguin Classics) by Scott, Walter Book The Cheap Fast Free Post.

Re-reading it in thisformat is truly a pleasure. See all Product description.

The Antiquary (Paperback). Published September 1st 1999 by Penguin Classics. Paperback, 512 pages. Author(s): Walter Scott, David Punter (Introduction). ISBN: 0140436529 (ISBN13: 9780140436525).

Set in Scotland at the end of the 18th century, this novel centres around a young man call Lovel who meets Johnathon Oldbuck, the loquacious old antiquary, on a trip to Scotland. When he is introduced to Sir Arthur Wardour and his daughter, Isabella, his life is irrevocably changed.

The story line is very smooth and easy to follow. David Warner's reading is perfect. His British accent is easy to understand and adds to the telling of the story. Music added at the beginning and end of each side provides additional atmosphere.

Penguin Books, 1999 - 454 sayfa

Penguin Books, 1999 - 454 sayfa. There Lovel falls in love with the daughter of Sir Arthur Wardour, a local landowner. However, with no wealth or title to offer, Lovel's feelings go unrequited until an extraordinary act of courage

With 11 full page colour illustrations .

With 11 full page colour illustrations. The story of one of the remaining Saxon noble families at a time when the nobility in England was overwhelmingly Norman. The main character is based on David Ritchie, whom Scott met in the autumn of 1797. This collection of literature attempts to compile many of the classic works that have stood the test of time and offer them at a reduced, affordable price, in an attractive volume so that everyone can enjoy them. History & Fiction.

The first authoritative editions--based on the acclaimed Edinburgh Edition of the Waverley novelsThe third novel in the Waverley series, and Scott's personal favorite, The Antiquary centers on a young man called Lovel who meets Jonathan Oldbuck, a loquacious old antiquary, on a trip to Scotland. There Lovel falls in love with the daughter of Sir Arthur Wardour, a local landowner. However, with no wealth or title to offer, Lovel's feelings go unrequited until an extraordinary act of courage. With its vivid drama and exuberant pace, The Antiquary confirms Scott's reputation as the great storyteller of modern Europe.
  • Let me say up front that I love this novel, that as crazy and at times annoying as it reads initially it grows on the patient reader rather quickly, and puts off a warm glow in your memory when you're done. But because it is an anomaly in his catalog, I hesitate to recommend it to most readers. If you either a., haven't read and enjoyed a few other Scott novels, and so are accustomed to his tone and style, or b., do not appreciate fussy, erudite, late eighteenth century-style humor, then this is not the Scott novel for you. Go to Waverley, Ivanhoe, The Heart of Midlothian, Kenilworth, Guy Mannering, or Rob Roy.

    The Antiquary is not so much a historical novel as it is a novel about history--about how and in what ways people bury, distort, and attempt to recall the past. Two plotlines, one humorous and unpretentious, one gothic and romantic, dovetail none too gracefully but in delightfully surprising ways. Critics tend to prefer the scenes set among a Scots peasant fishing family for their authenticity; I much prefer the mock-gothic comedy scenes, especially those featuring wise-ass beggar Edie Ochiltree. I like to think that the jovial Scott preferred them too. (Literary critics often lack a sense of humor.)

    The third of Scott's novels after Waverley and Guy Mannering, The Antiquary resembles the second more than the first in its freehanded mixture of a different styles and genres and in its enthusiasm.

  • This is a lovely novel but the introduction and notes to this edition aren't as good as the ones in the Oxford World's Classics.