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ePub In the Theatre of Romanticism: Coleridge, Nationalism, Women (Cambridge Studies in Romanticism) download

by Julie A. Carlson

ePub In the Theatre of Romanticism: Coleridge, Nationalism, Women (Cambridge Studies in Romanticism) download
Author:
Julie A. Carlson
ISBN13:
978-0521039635
ISBN:
0521039630
Language:
Publisher:
Cambridge University Press; 1 edition (August 27, 2007)
Category:
Subcategory:
History & Criticism
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1885 kb
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1533 kb
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Rating:
4.2
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941

English Romanticism has long been considered an 'undramatic' and 'anti-theatrical' age, yet Wordsworth, Coleridge, Byron, Shelley and Keats all wrote plays.

English Romanticism has long been considered an 'undramatic' and 'anti-theatrical' age, yet Wordsworth, Coleridge, Byron, Shelley and Keats all wrote plays. In the Theatre of Romanticism analyses these (and especially Coleridge's) plays, in the context of London theatre at the time, focusing on their constructions of women and nationhood.

Start by marking In the Theatre of Romanticism: Coleridge, Nationalism .

Start by marking In the Theatre of Romanticism: Coleridge, Nationalism, Women as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read. The book focuses primarily on Coleridge and on the middle stage of his career, during which he wrote most extensively for and about the theatre. But its discussion of anxieties about women in Coleridge's plays applies just as forcefully to the history plays of the second-generation romantic poets, and to the best-known romantic writers on theatre: Hazlitt, Hunt and Lamb.

The english romantic closet: Women theatre artists, Joanna Baillie, andBasil. Nineteenth-Century Contexts, Vol. 19, Issue. Series: Cambridge Studies in Romanticism (5). Export citation. Recommend to librarian.

Автор: Julie A. Carlson Название: In the Theatre of Romanticism .

The book focuses primarily on Coleridge and on the middle stage of his career, during which he wrote most extensively for and about the theatre.

Romanticism (also known as the Romantic era) was an artistic, literary, musical and intellectual movement that originated in Europe toward the end of the 18th century, and in most areas was at its peak in the approximate period from 1800 to 1850

Romanticism (also known as the Romantic era) was an artistic, literary, musical and intellectual movement that originated in Europe toward the end of the 18th century, and in most areas was at its peak in the approximate period from 1800 to 1850. Romanticism was characterized by its emphasis on emotion and individualism as well as glorification of all the past and nature, preferring the medieval rather than the classical.

English Romanticism has long been considered an 'undramatic' and 'anti-theatrical' age, yet Wordsworth, Coleridge, Byron, Shelley and Keats all wrote plays and viewed them as central to England's poetic and political reform. In the Theatre of Romanticism analyses these plays, in the context of London theatre at the time, and argues that Romantic discourse on theatre is crucial to constructions of nationhood in the period.

Julie Carlson, "Romantic Antitheatricalism: Surveilling the Beauties of the Stage. In the Theatre of Romanticism: Coleridge, Nationalism, Women (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1994), 134-175 (on reserve). C. Davis, "'Reading Shakespeare By Flashes of Lightning': Challenging the Foundations of Romantic Acting Theory.

Terence Allan Hoagwood. Terence Allan Hoagwood, "In the Theatre of Romanticism: Coleridge, Nationalism, Women by Julie A. Carlson," The Wordsworth Circle 26, no. 4 (Autumn 1995): 196-198. Of all published articles, the following were the most read within the past 12 months. Antiquarianism as a Vital Historiography for the Twenty-First Century. Science and Human Animality in Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein. Movement in Hymn to Intellectual Beauty. Blake, Hegel, and the Sciences.

English Romanticism has long been considered an 'undramatic' and 'anti-theatrical' age, yet Wordsworth, Coleridge, Byron, Shelley and Keats all wrote plays and viewed them as central to England's poetic and political reform. In the Theatre of Romanticism analyses these plays, in the context of London theatre at the time, and argues that Romantic discourse on theatre is crucial to constructions of nationhood in the period. The book focuses primarily on Coleridge and on the middle stage of his career, during which he wrote most extensively for and about the theatre. But its discussion of anxieties about women in Coleridge's plays applies just as forcefully to the history plays of the second-generation romantic poets, and to the best-known romantic writers on theatre: Hazlitt, Hunt and Lamb. Unlike the few existing studies of romantic drama, this study considers the plays not as closet drama or 'mental theatre', but as theatrical contributions to the debate sparked off by the Revolution in France.