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ePub Aristotle: Minor Works: On Colours. On Things Heard. Physiognomics. On Plants. On Marvellous Things Heard. Mechanical Problems. On Indivisible Lines. ... Gorgias (Loeb Classical Library No. 307) download

by Aristotle,Walter Stanley Hett

ePub Aristotle: Minor Works: On Colours. On Things Heard. Physiognomics. On Plants. On Marvellous Things Heard. Mechanical Problems. On Indivisible Lines. ... Gorgias (Loeb Classical Library No. 307) download
Author:
Aristotle,Walter Stanley Hett
ISBN13:
978-0674993389
ISBN:
0674993381
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Publisher:
Harvard University Press (January 1, 1936)
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Subcategory:
History & Criticism
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1749 kb
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1704 kb
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Rating:
4.2
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188

Latin, Greek, Classics, Loeb.

L 307 Aristotle Minor Works On Colours, On Things Heard, Physiognomics, On Plants, On Marvellous Things Heard, Mechanical Problems, On Indivisible Lines The Situations & Names Of Winds On Melissus Xenophanes Gorgias. Latin, Greek, Classics, Loeb.

On Indivisible Lines. The Situations and Names of Winds. On Melissus, Xenophanes, Gorgias. LCL 307: Find in a Library. He studied under Plato at Athens and taught there (367–347); subsequently he spent three years at the court of a former pupil, Hermeias, in Asia Minor and at this time married Pythias, one of Hermeias's relations. After some time at Mitylene, in 343–2 he was appointed by King Philip of Macedon to be tutor of his teen-aged son Alexander.

Gorgias (Loeb Classical Library No. 307). Aristotle: Minor Works: On Colours. On Marvellous Things Heard. On Indivisible Lines. Gorgias (Loeb Classical Library No. Aristotle, W. S. Hett. Скачать (pdf, 1. 4 Mb).

Nearly all the works Aristotle prepared for publication are lost; the priceless ones extant are lecture-materials, notes, and memoranda (some are spurious). They can be categorized as follows: I. Practical: "Nicomachean Ethics"; "Great Ethics" ("Magna Moralia"); "Eudemian Ethics"; "Politics"; "Oeconomica" (on the good of the family); "Virtues and Vices.

On July 20, we had the largest server crash in the last 2 years. Full recovery of all data can take up to 2 weeks! So we came to the decision at this time to double the download limits for all users until the problem is completely resolved. Thanks for your understanding! Progress: 6. 1% restored. Главная Minor Works: On Colours. 307)

On Indivisible Lines. He studied under Plato at Athens and taught there (367–347); subsequently he spent three years at the court of a former pupil, Hermeias, in Asia Minor and at this time married Pythias, one of Hermeias's relations

Aristotle: Minor Works: On Colours.

Aristotle: Minor Works: On Colours. Category: Математика, Математическая физика. 2018-11-03Virtual Works Actual Things Essays in Music Ontology. Related Archive Books. Archive Books related to " Aristotle: Minor Works: On Colours. I have always enjoyed the Loeb Classical Library books and Aristotle's "On the Heavens" is no exception. As an astronomical historian, this is a great book as it demonstrates the beginnings of astronomical thought. Generally, I would classify this as a medieval book. There is a lot of insight, if you like Aristotle, but the problems sometimes verge on the quotidian.

The Loeb Library, with its Greek or Latin on one side of the page and its English .

The Loeb Library, with its Greek or Latin on one side of the page and its English on the other, came as a gift of freedom. The existence of the amateur was recognised by the publication of this Library, and to a great extent made respectable. The I Tatti Renaissance Library presents key Renaissance works in Latin with a facing English translation; it is bound similarly to the Loeb Classics, but in a larger format and with blue covers. A third series, the Dumbarton Oaks Medieval Library, was introduced in 2010 covering works in Byzantine Greek, Medieval Latin, and Old English.

Aristotle, great Greek philosopher, researcher, reasoner, and writer, born at Stagirus in 384 BCE, was the son of Nicomachus, a physician, and Phaestis. He studied under Plato at Athens and taught there (367–47); subsequently he spent three years at the court of a former pupil, Hermeias, in Asia Minor and at this time married Pythias, one of Hermeias’s relations. After some time at Mitylene, in 343–2 he was appointed by King Philip of Macedon to be tutor of his teen-aged son Alexander. After Philip’s death in 336, Aristotle became head of his own school (of “Peripatetics”), the Lyceum at Athens. Because of anti-Macedonian feeling there after Alexander’s death in 323, he withdrew to Chalcis in Euboea, where he died in 322.Nearly all the works Aristotle prepared for publication are lost; the priceless ones extant are lecture-materials, notes, and memoranda (some are spurious). They can be categorized as follows:I. Practical: Nicomachean Ethics; Great Ethics (Magna Moralia); Eudemian Ethics; Politics; Oeconomica (on the good of the family); Virtues and Vices.II. Logical: Categories; On Interpretation; Analytics (Prior and Posterior); On Sophistical Refutations; Topica.III. Physical: Twenty-six works (some suspect) including astronomy, generation and destruction, the senses, memory, sleep, dreams, life, facts about animals, etc.IV. Metaphysics: on being as being.V. On Art: Art of Rhetoric and Poetics.VI. Other works including the Athenian Constitution; more works also of doubtful authorship.VII. Fragments of various works such as dialogues on philosophy and literature; and of treatises on rhetoric, politics and metaphysics.The Loeb Classical Library® edition of Aristotle is in twenty-three volumes.

  • Here is a representative statement from "On Indivisible Lines": "If, then, thought touching the series one by one is counting, then it must be possible to count an infinite series in finite time. If this is impossible, then there must exist an indivisible line." (968)

    The meat of "On Indivisible Lines" is what it means to say that a line is made of points and what it means to say that something is indivisible. The treatise itself could be confusedly written or corrupted, or the translation might be bad, which I suspect is the case, especially because it is translated among various minor Aristotelian works all by one translator, and one translator is unlikely to have a mastery of both Greek mathematics and Greek botany. For example, I suspect that "potentially commensurate" would be better translated like Heath as "commensurable in square", meaning that their squares (powers) are commensurable.

    Because of its discussion of commensurable lines, "On Indivisible Lines" is a necessary source for any study of commensurable and incommensurable magnitudes in ancient Greek geometry, in particular of Euclid V and X. I would like to see a translation of this work done by a mathematician, like Heath. (Mathematician need not mean a member of a mathematics department; rather it is someone who is comfortable reading and writing mathematical proofs, but there are not many philosophers and even fewer classicists who are mathematicians; the best candidate I can think of for a translator Burnyeat.)

    The other two important treatises in this collection are "Mechanical Problems" and "On Melissus, Xenophanes, and Gorgias". The other treatises are likely useful for studies of ancient Greek science also, but I doubt they have any importance for mechanics and mathematics.

  • Aristotle was one of the first Europeans to mentally investigate concepts invented by the human mind. He was taught and nurtured by Plato and other extraordinary men who used the freedom provided by the excellent organization of Athens to introspect and to examine the concepts such as color, workings of a plant, and the mind itself. In particular they questioned the source of reality.
    In reading this book, one is soothed by the simple and thorough treatment of these investigations. One can understand the workings of a great mind which grew up in the stimulating environment of Athens.
    This is especially poignant since we know the environment was rent by war for over 1000 years during which almost no men, except some in the Chinese states, had the leisure to mentally explore ideas and to questions the workings of God, or T'ao.
    To the contrary, almost all men destroyed books.
    The Muslims treasured the Greek books even though they could not read them. So they preserved a tiny part of the flower of Athens. Some of Aristotle's books were preserved at Alexandria Library in Egypt before it was burned down by the Roman Caesar.
    So we must consume these books while they still exist knowing that war continues as ever.