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ePub Class, Critics, and Shakespeare: Bottom Lines on the Culture Wars download

by Sharon Kay O'Dair

ePub Class, Critics, and Shakespeare: Bottom Lines on the Culture Wars download
Author:
Sharon Kay O'Dair
ISBN13:
978-0472097548
ISBN:
0472097547
Language:
Publisher:
University of Michigan Press; First Edition edition (January 10, 2001)
Category:
Subcategory:
History & Criticism
ePub file:
1108 kb
Fb2 file:
1964 kb
Other formats:
txt mbr doc lrf
Rating:
4.8
Votes:
457

Class, Critics, and Shakespeare book. Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Start by marking Class, Critics, and Shakespeare: Bottom Lines on the Culture Wars as Want to Read: Want to Read saving.

Class, Critics, and Shakespeare book. Start by marking Class, Critics, and Shakespeare: Bottom Lines on the Culture Wars as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

Class, Critics, and Shakespeare is a provocative contribution to "the culture wars. Sharon O'Dair observes that in these same readings, class privilege has remained effectively unchallenged, despite repeated invocations of it within multiculturalism

Class, Critics, and Shakespeare is a provocative contribution to "the culture wars. It engages with an ongoing debate about literary canons, the democratization of literary study, and of higher education in general. Sharon O'Dair observes that in these same readings, class privilege has remained effectively unchallenged, despite repeated invocations of it within multiculturalism. She identifies what she sees as a structurally necessary class bias in academic literary and cultural criticism, specifically in the contemporary reception of William Shakespeare's plays.

Class, Critics, and Shakespeare "is a provocative contribution to "the culture wars. For a generation at least, academic readings of literary works, including those of Shakespeare, have often challenged privilege based on race, gender, and sexuality. Sharon O'Dair observes that in these same readings, class privilege has remained effectively unchallenged, despit. ONTINUE READING. Sharon O'Dair is Associate Professor of English, University of Alabama.

Class, Critics, and Shakespeare: Bottom Lines on the Culture Wars. Bridget Gellert Lyons. November 2003 · Renaissance Quarterly.

Sharon O’Dair, Class, Critics, and Shakespeare: Bottom Lines on the Culture Wars (Ann Arbor: University of Michigan Press, 2000). The phrase ideological dupes had some currency in cultural studies debates about whether consumers of popular culture were unwitting victims of manipulation or whether responses to such texts were more knowing and complex.

O'Dair, Sharon: Class, critics, and Shakespeare : bottom lines on the culture wars, Sharon O'Dair. Ann Arbor : University of Michigan Press, c2000) (page images at HathiTrust).

This volume of essays examines the study of Shakespeare and of literature more generally in today’s climate of. .

This volume of essays examines the study of Shakespeare and of literature more generally in today’s climate of educational and professional uncertainty, comprising a timely conversation through the discursive political lenses of Occupy Wall Street and the 99. The smartest, most original, and most useful book on Shakespeare and the politics of higher education I have seen in many years.

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Her books include Class, Critics, and Shakespeare: Bottom Lines on the Culture Wars (U of Michigan P, 2000) and, with D. L. Miller and H. Weber, The Production of English Renaissance Culture (Cornell UP, 1994).

Her books include Class, Critics, and Shakespeare: Bottom Lines on the Culture Wars (U of Michigan P, 2000) and, with D. UC Davis dean is Nebraska’s next executive vice chancellor. Great Plains graduate fellows visit western Nebraska. Husker speech and debate team wins Big Ten title. 203 Andrews Hall Lincoln NE 68588-0333 402-472-3191 402-472-9771 (fax). This is a humanities area of the College of Arts and Sciences.

Class, Critics, and Shakespeare is a provocative contribution to "the culture wars." It engages with an ongoing debate about literary canons, the democratization of literary study, and of higher education in general.For a generation at least, academic readings of literary works, including those of Shakespeare, have often challenged privilege based on race, gender, and sexuality. Sharon O'Dair observes that in these same readings, class privilege has remained effectively unchallenged, despite repeated invocations of it within multiculturalism. She identifies what she sees as a structurally necessary class bias in academic literary and cultural criticism, specifically in the contemporary reception of William Shakespeare's plays.The author builds her argument by offering readings of Shakespeare that put class at the center of the analysis--not just in Shakespeare's plays or in early modern England, but in the academy and in American society today. Individual chapters focus on The Tempest and education, Timon of Athens and capitalism, Coriolanus and political representation. Other chapters treat the politics of cultural tourism and land-use in the Pacific northwest, and analyze the politics of the academic left in the U.S. today, focusing on the debate between what has been called a "social" left and a "cultural" left.The author's quest is to understand why an intellectual culture that values diversity and pluralism can so easily disdain and ignore the working-class people she grew up with. Her provocative and heartfelt critique of academic culture will challenge and enlighten a broad range of audiences, including those in cultural studies, American studies, literary criticism, and early modern literature.Sharon O'Dair is Associate Professor of English, University of Alabama.