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ePub Lovers And Beloveds: Sexual Otherness In Southern Fiction, 1936-1961 (Southern Literary Studies) download

by Gary Richards

ePub Lovers And Beloveds: Sexual Otherness In Southern Fiction, 1936-1961 (Southern Literary Studies) download
Author:
Gary Richards
ISBN13:
978-0807130513
ISBN:
0807130516
Language:
Publisher:
Louisiana State Univ Pr (April 1, 2005)
Category:
Subcategory:
History & Criticism
ePub file:
1774 kb
Fb2 file:
1577 kb
Other formats:
txt lit mobi lrf
Rating:
4.3
Votes:
719

Gary Richards makes To Kill a Mockingbird reveal itself as a classic text of Lesbian desire

Gary Richards makes To Kill a Mockingbird reveal itself as a classic text of Lesbian desire. Although Lee's community sets up enduring heterosexual marriages as the norm, they are almost nonexistent and, with the one exception of Tom and Helen Robinson, never gratifying.

In Lovers and Beloveds, Gary Richards draws on contemporary theories of sexuality in reading the fiction of six .

In Lovers and Beloveds, Gary Richards draws on contemporary theories of sexuality in reading the fiction of six writers of the era who accepted that potentially pejorative characterization as an opportunity: Truman Capote, William Goyen, Harper Lee, Carson McCullers, Lillian Smith, and Richard Wright. Richards skillfully juxtaposes forgotten texts by those writers with their canonical works to identify the complex narratives of same-sex desire.

Lovers and Beloveds: Sexual Otherness in Southern Fiction, 1936-1961 (Southern Literary Studies).

Lovers and Beloveds book His beautifully structured study examines sexual otherness in mid-20th-century Southern fiction by Capote, William Goyen, Richard Wright.

Lovers and Beloveds book. In Lovers and Beloveds, Gary Richards draws on contemporary theories of sexuality in reading the fiction of six writers of the era who accepted that potentially pejorative characterization as an opportunity: Truman Capote, William Goyen, Harper Lee, Carson McCullers, Lillian Smith, and Richard Wright. His beautifully structured study examines sexual otherness in mid-20th-century Southern fiction by Capote, William Goyen, Richard Wright, Lillian Smith, Harper Lee, and Carson McCullers.

In Lovers and Beloveds, Gary Richards draws on contemporary theories of sexuality in reading the fiction of six writers of the era who accepted that potentially pejorative characterization as an opportunity: Truman Capote, William Goyen, Harper Lee, Carson McCullers, Lillian Smith. Richards skillfully juxtaposes forgotten texts by those writers with canonical works to identify the complex narratives of same-sex desire.

Lovers and Beloveds: Sexual Otherness in Southern Fiction, 1936-1961. Louisiana State University Press. The Nation's Region: Southern Modernism, Segregation, and . p. 97. ISBN 0807132462. University of Georgia Press. 195. ISBN 0820334189.

Winner Description: Richards, Gary; Louisiana State, 2005. Title of a book, article or other published item (this will display to the public)

Winner Description: Richards, Gary; Louisiana State, 2005. Title of a book, article or other published item (this will display to the public): Lovers and beloveds: sexual otherness in southern fiction, 1936-1961. ISBN of the winning item: 0807130516.

In Lovers and Beloveds, Gary Richards draws on contemporary theories of. . This is the first book to assess the significance of same-sex desire in a broad range of southern texts, making a crucial contribution to the study of both literature and sexuality.

Richards skillfully juxtaposes forgotten texts by those writers with canonical works to identify the complex narratives of same-sex desire

Richards skillfully juxtaposes forgotten texts by those writers with canonical works to identify the complex narratives of same-sex desire. In their novels and stories, the authors consistently reimagine gender roles, centralize homoeroticism, and probe its relationship with class, race, biological sex, and southern identity.

Beloveds : Sexual Otherness in Southern Fiction, 1936-1961.

Lovers and Beloveds : Sexual Otherness in Southern Fiction, 1936-1961. A challenge to traditional criticism, this engaging study demonstrates that issues of sexuality - and same-sex desire in particular - were of central importance in the literary production of the Southern Renaissance.

A challenge to traditional criticism, this engaging study demonstrates that issues of sexuality—and same-sex desire in particular—were of central importance in the literary production of the Southern Renaissance. Especially during the end of that period—approximately the 1940s and 1950s—the national literary establishment tacitly designated the South as an allowable setting for fictionalized deviancy, thus permitting southern writers tremendous freedom to explore sexual otherness. In Lovers and Beloveds, Gary Richards draws on contemporary theories of sexuality in reading the fiction of six writers of the era who accepted that potentially pejorative characterization as an opportunity: Truman Capote, William Goyen, Harper Lee, Carson McCullers, Lillian Smith, and Richard Wright.

Richards skillfully juxtaposes forgotten texts by those writers with their canonical works to identify the complex narratives of same-sex desire. In their novels and stories, the authors consistently reimagine gender roles, centralize homoeroticism, and probe its relationship with class, race, biological sex, and southern identity. These works, Richards argues, do not constitute a coherent gay literary tradition for the region but nevertheless frustrate efforts to define southern literature along conventional lines.

This is the first book to assess the significance of same-sex desire in a broad range of southern texts, making a crucial contribution to the study of both literature and sexuality. Highly readable and thoughtful in its arguments, Lovers and Beloveds reorients southern literature’s outsider status as—not detrimental to its vitality but—liberating indeed.

Includes discussion of Other Voices, Other Rooms (1948); The House of Breath (1950); "Big Boy Leaves Home" (1936); The Long Dream (1958); Strange Fruit (1944); One Hour (1959); To Kill a Mockingbird (1960); The Heart Is a Lonely Hunter (1940); Reflections in a Golden Eye (1941); The Ballad of the Sad Café (1943); and Clock Without Hands (1961).

  • This is a most informative and intellegent book. The style is readable, adding to its interest.

  • A book by a man who has read a number of texts with a fine tooth comb, looking for examples of same-sex desire and sexually transgrssive characters.

    Gary Richards makes To Kill a Mockingbird reveal itself as a classic text of Lesbian desire. No wonder it is the favorite novel of so many young women. "Although Lee's community sets up enduring heterosexual marriages as the norm, they are almost nonexistent and, with the one exception of Tom and Helen Robinson, never gratifying." He shows us that the way Atticus is not a married man is an example of a deliberate choice by the author to make him not a sexual creature. We had thought it to be a book about racial otherness, but in fact Richards suggests it is a book about sexual otherness, so that even so twisted a creature as Boo Radley can be sympathetically alluded to with his mockingbird symbolism.

    Richards can't make William Goyen any more interesting than previous commentators. I think the truth is Goyen is pretty bad, but on the other hand Richards scores a touchdown when it comes to re-imagining Lillian Smith, the author of STRANGE FRUIT and ONE HOUR, two books that deserve a wider readership for, despite their creaky datedness, they possess that most inextinguishable thing, the touch of genius. Richard Wright and Carson McCullers also get the Gary Richards treatment as well. While we are now familiar with Carson McCullers as a woman fascinated and moved by same-sex desire, readers of Richard Wright might be startled by Richards' frank account of him as a writer and man working out an eager bisexuality, particularly in the late novel THE LONG DREAM and the early story "Big Boy Comes Home."