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ePub The Rouge of the North download

by Eileen Chang,David Der-Wei Wang

ePub The Rouge of the North download
Author:
Eileen Chang,David Der-Wei Wang
ISBN13:
978-0520214385
ISBN:
0520214382
Language:
Publisher:
University of California Press; New edition edition (August 10, 1998)
Category:
Subcategory:
History & Criticism
ePub file:
1876 kb
Fb2 file:
1519 kb
Other formats:
rtf txt lrf mbr
Rating:
4.6
Votes:
159

by Eileen Chang (Author), David Der-Wei Wang (Foreword). The viable option is obvious. After reading The Rouge of the North, one either senses the triumphant of Yindi's perseverance or sees her as a mad concubine who chooses to compromise her dignity for power

by Eileen Chang (Author), David Der-Wei Wang (Foreword). After reading The Rouge of the North, one either senses the triumphant of Yindi's perseverance or sees her as a mad concubine who chooses to compromise her dignity for power. Whatever view the readers adopt, one thing is certain, Eileen Chang has written a poignant masterpiece of an incredible woman who perseveres through the confinement by her society.

This book follows the story of a Chinese woman called Yindi, who goes through an arranged marriage.

Dramatic events in the ou The Rouge of the North is the story of Yindi, a beautiful young bride who marries the blind, bedridden son of a rich and noble family. Captive to household ritual, to the strategies and contempt of her sisters-in-law, and to the exacting dictates of her husband's mother, Yindi is pressed beneath the weight of an existence that offers no hope of change. Dramatic events in the outside world fail to make their way into this insular society. This book follows the story of a Chinese woman called Yindi, who goes through an arranged marriage.

Eileen Chang, David Der-wei Wang. The Rouge of the North is the story of Yindi, a beautiful young bride who marries the blind, bedridden son of a rich and noble family.

The previous book by Eileen Chang I read, The Rice Sprout Song .

The previous book by Eileen Chang I read, The Rice Sprout Song, was sponsored by the US government as propaganda against the Chinese Communist regime. That meant that it wasn't exactly just Chang's work (and indeed the foreward here by David Der-wei Wang mentions that Chang was annoyed by how much politics she had to put into the book). The Rouge of the North was written a decade later and without that same sponsorship, so it's in that sense more true to Chang's creative vision. Yindi is a young woman who works in her brother's sesame oil store in Shanghai.

In his preface to The Rouge of the North, David Der-wei Wang has offered a detailed analysis of possible reasons for Eileen Chang to rewrite and translate the same story several times. She might have wanted to establish herself as a distinguished writer of both Chinese and English fiction in China and in the United States

One of the best books on art I've ever read - the inner thinking behind abstract and conceptual art by one master artist.

One of the best books on art I've ever read - the inner thinking behind abstract and conceptual art by one master artist.

Chang’s most important contribution was her construction of an alternative wartime narrative, one that deviated from the . a b Wang, David Der-wei (2016). Methods to Imagine China

The Rouge of the North (tr. of 怨女) HC. ISBN 0-520-21438-2 PB 0520210875. Methods to Imagine China. History· Fictional Writing· Narration (想象中国的方法 历史·小说·叙事). Tianjin: Baihua Wenyi chu ban she. p. 248-251.

With the reissue of "The Rouge of the North" and "The Rice Sprout Song", readers will have the opportunity to appreciate Eileen Chang's elegant prose style, her harrowing analyses of human motives, and her keen understanding of desire, loneliness, and hunger, both physical an. .

With the reissue of "The Rouge of the North" and "The Rice Sprout Song", readers will have the opportunity to appreciate Eileen Chang's elegant prose style, her harrowing analyses of human motives, and her keen understanding of desire, loneliness, and hunger, both physical and metaphysical. Eileen Chang beautifully and movingly evokes 20th-century China and the hearts and minds of Chinese women". Jung Chang, author of "Wild Swans". Genre: General Fiction. Similar books by other authors.

Discover Book Depository's huge selection of David Der Wei Wang books online. Free delivery worldwide on over 20 million titles. The Rouge of the North.

The Rouge of the North is the story of Yindi, a beautiful young bride who marries the blind, bedridden son of a rich and noble family. Captive to household ritual, to the strategies and contempt of her sisters-in-law, and to the exacting dictates of her husband's mother, Yindi is pressed beneath the weight of an existence that offers no hope of change. Dramatic events in the outside world fail to make their way into this insular society. Chang's brilliant portrayal of the slow suffocation of passion, moral strength, and physical vitality—together with her masterful evocation of the sights, smells, and sounds of daily existence—make The Rouge of the North a remarkable chronicle of a vanished way of life.
  • Good

  • In Ding Ling's "Miss Sophia's Diary," in the entry of March 28, the main character, Sophia, makes an honest assessment of her life as a woman: "....why I've felt such bitter despair for so long. Only I know how many tears I've shed....Rather than calling this diary a record of my life, it's more accurate to regard it as the sum of all my tears." In a way, Eileen(Ai-Ling)Chang's Rouge of the North is the sum of Yindi's tears. From a lower class, Yindi is fated to be doomed in a patriarchal system. As a woman, she does not have much choice in deciding whom she's going to marry. Her only shred of freedom is shown when she fantasizes about marrying Young Liu. However, she knows, for more practical reasons, that marrying Young Liu is out of the question. He is poor and unassertive. Her brother and sister-in-law quickly arrange her marriage with a richer family. Little does she know, her new husband is blind and somewhat an invalid, who lies in bed and gets high on opium. The second part, a big bulk of it, devotes to Yindi's life at the Yao's residence. At her new husband's residence, Yindi has to deal with her controlling mother-in-law, Big Mistress, who, after the death of her husband, practically takes over the household. Furthermore, Yindi is more like a babysitter to her husband than she is a wife to him. He refuses to talk about their future or where they're standing as far as family inheritance is concerned. Along with a demanding mother-in-law, Yindi also has to face the other sisters-in-law. They ridicule her of her child-like husband and her sex life. However, later on, Yindi finds out that Third Mistress (or third sister-in-law) is as unhappy as she is. Third Mistress eventually laments to Yindi that Third Master is never home. He is always at a "singsong" house or an opium den. He usually comes home in the wee hour of the night. On top of that, Third Mistress has to concoct all sorts of stories to save him from his mother, Old Mistress. Through out this part of the novel, we also learn that Third Master and Yindi have sexual attraction for each other. Whether or not they carry that relationship further, I am not quite sure. That part of the relationship is rather ambiguous. However, readers can definitely feel the sexual tension or attraction between them. In any cases, it seems that Yindi revels in that kind of tension. She needs attention. Another interesting element in the novel is how Chang creates that competitive sense among these women. They all want to protect each other; unfortunately, they also feel to have the need to stab each other's back. It is like a vicious cycle. In the final part, Yindi gives birth to a boy,Yensheng, which itself is a blessing and a celebration. The birth of a girl would probably not only diminish Yindi's status but also devastate her. Yengsheng also becomes an opium addict. As a child, he has chronic asthma. They breath opium into him to relieve his asthmatic symptoms. Also at this point of the novel, as China is going through drastic changes, so does the Yao family. Old Mistress dies. China is at war with the Japanese. The family wealths are divided among the men, of course. Most of these men are senior members of the family. With the possibility that Yensheng may be inherited the future estate, Yindi's power is spinning out of control. The family is falling apart. Third Master is getting old and being pounded by debt collectors. I think Third Mistress kills herself (I am not sure). Consequently, in the end, we see Yindi gradually becoming powerful, in a mad sense. Eileen (Ai-Ling) Chang has created a brilliant portrait of a young girl going mad because of the patriarchal, recyclic system, in which women are regarded as merely a reproductive opportunity. Whether one sees Yindi as a coward or a victim, one thing is certainly true, she does not have a choice. Like Flaubert's Madame Bovary or any of Austen's female characters, regardless of their status and intelligence, marriage and death are the only two options. The viable option is obvious. After reading The Rouge of the North, one either senses the triumphant of Yindi's perseverance or sees her as a mad concubine who chooses to compromise her dignity for power. Whatever view the readers adopt, one thing is certain, Eileen Chang has written a poignant masterpiece of an incredible woman who perseveres through the confinement by her society.
    ** Also read Su Tong's Raise the Red Lanterns (also a film by Zhang Yimou) and anything works by Ding Ling **

  • Eileen Chang has created a vivid and poignant portrait of a young who is trapped in a traditional, patriachal system. Yindi, a lower-class girl, is forced into an unhappy marriage. Her husband is ineffectual and somewhat infantile. Blind and addicted to opium, he can not defend Yindi and himself. Yindi's mother-in-law, Old Mistress, is also a victim of the system herself. She turns her power onto everyone in the house. In reality, after her death, none of her sons gets a dime. In the end, Yindi mistakens her madness as her power. Her insanity escalates as China goes through drastic changes. Chang's prose is captivating; it keeps spinning the fascinating, complex of Yindi. The descriptions are vividly drawn. Chang wrote this novel in English (no translation).

  • This book is good,too.I am like it.

  • Thoroughly enjoyed this one. Well worth the asking price. Definitely needs to be added to the collection if you like the authors other works.