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ePub Pearl S. Buck: A Cultural Biography download

by Peter Conn

ePub Pearl S. Buck: A Cultural Biography download
Author:
Peter Conn
ISBN13:
978-0780353794
ISBN:
0521560802
Language:
Publisher:
Cambridge University Press; 1st Edition edition (August 26, 1996)
Category:
Subcategory:
History & Criticism
ePub file:
1723 kb
Fb2 file:
1319 kb
Other formats:
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Rating:
4.1
Votes:
922

Peter Conn's Pearl S. Buck: A Cultural Biography sets out to reconstruct Buck's life and significance, and to restore this remarkable woman to visibility.

Peter Conn's Pearl S. Pearl Buck was one of the most renowned, interesting, and controversial figures ever to influence American and Chinese cultural and literary history - yet she remains one of the least studied, honored, or remembered.

Drawing on his academic training in American Studies, he sets the events of her life against a rich background of Chinese and American political and social history. His richly detailed and informative book should do much to encourage the reassessment of the life of this remarkable woman.

Peter Conn, in his biography of Buck, argues that despite the accolades awarded to her, Buck's contribution to literature has been mostly forgotten or deliberately ignored by America's cultural gatekeepers. Kang Liao argues that Buck played a "pioneering role in demythologizing China and the Chinese people in the American mind". Phyllis Bentley, in an overview of Buck's work. My Several Worlds: A Personal Record (New York: John Day, 1954). My Several Worlds– abridged for younger readers by Cornelia Spencer (New York: John Day, 1957).

Pearl S. Buck: A Cultural Biography by Peter Conn. Clubwomen Gaining on Goal," Charleston Daily Mail, March 11, 1969. The Pearl S. Buck Birthplace, official site. Buck : a cultural biography. by. Conn, Peter J. Publication date. Preface : rediscovering Pearl Buck - Missionary childhood - New worlds - Winds of change - The good earth - An exile's return - The prize - Wartime - Losing battles - Pearl Sydenstricker - Epilogue : Green Hills farm.

Peter Conn's sweeping biography of Pearl Buck is as fascinating and provocative as Ms. Buck herself. I have been an admirer of Buck's writing for years, however I never knew the true depth of her character and achievements until I read Conn's book. I have been an admirer of Buck's writing for years, however I never knew the true depth of her character and achievements until I read Conn's book

Peter Conn's Pearl S. Buck: A Cultural Biography sets out to reconstruct Buck's life and significance, and to restore this remarkable woman to visibility

Peter Conn's Pearl S. Born into a missionary family, Pearl Buck lived the first half of her life in China and was bilingual from childhood. Peter Conn's Pearl S.

Professor Conn talked about his book, Pearl S. Buck: A Cultural Biography, a National Book Critics Circle nominee. Pearl Buck was the author of novels such as The Good Earth which won both the Nobel and Pulitzer Prizes. She was also a civil and women’s rights activist. He took questions from the audience. BUCK: A CULTURAL BIOGRAPHY, by Peter Conn, Cambridge University Press, 468 pages .

The extraordinary life of Pearl Sydenstricker Buck, a remarkable writer raised in China by American missionary parents and whose prize-winning books reflected her experiences and observations in that country, is well documented in this recent biography.

Pearl S. Buck was one of the most renowned, interesting, and controversial figures ever to influence American and Chinese cultural and literary history--and yet she remains one of the least studied, honored, or remembered. In this richly illustrated and meticulously crafted narrative, Conn recounts Buck's life in absorbing detail, tracing the parallel course of American and Chinese history. This "cultural biography" thus offers a dual portrait: of Buck, a figure greater than history cares to remember, and of the era she helped to shape.
  • I learned quite a bit about Pearl Buck from this bio, but was disappointed there wasn't more about her time in WV, my home state. She was an amazing woman, a leader in women's issues well ahead of her time. Her work with mental and developmentally challenged children and also orphans was also outstanding. I didn't find the writing style particularly engaging, however.

  • I just finished reading this biography and was very impressed. Certainly I had heard of Pearl Buck over the years but somehow missed reading any of her novels. What a terrible loss that would have been! While reading Conn's biography, I decided to put it aside briefly and read Pearl Buck's "The Good Earth." What a fascinating novel. I was truly mesmorized by her timeless and beautiful prose. I continued on with Conn's biography of Ms. Buck and was equally impressed by the true life story of this remarkable woman. Without a doubt, she was a woman well ahead of her time. As a bonus, Conn provides a relatively in-depth discussion and analysis of world events during Buck's lifetime. As interesting as it is informative. After reading Conn's bio, I have begun reading the many books that Pearl Buck has authored. She was a prolific writer so this will be no easy undertaking, but I am eager for the challenge. Now that I know more about her life, I believe it will add a great deal more to the reading experience. Conn's writing style is straight forward and easy to read. He brought Pearl Bucks personality and accomplishments to life for me...and for that I will be eternally grateful. There is something for everyone here because of the breadth of the material. Its definitely worth the read.

  • I found the first half very engrossing: it tells of Pearl's growing up in China as the daughter of missionaries. The latter part of the book where she lives in the United States was not so interesting to me.

  • The author has presented Pearl Buck warts and all. Unfortunately, we expect our cultural icons to be without normal human problems and afflictions. By this reasoning we miss understanding the methods they use to overcome their own 'humanism.' Instead of apologizing for their 'warts' I would prefer to understand how they achieved what they did in spike of said warts. Other than that, this is a great book about an amazing human being who should have been listened to very carefully by our country's leaders.

  • Pearl Buck is an underrated persona--not just for her writing, but her humanitarian efforts. This book probes further than the surface-level story you usually get on Buck; it also includes a thorough history of Pearl Buck's China.

  • The portions of Buck's life in West Virginia, her birthplace, the place she "joined" the church at age ten, the place she considered her ancestral link to the USA, is barely mentioned. It is a biography with a hole in it.

  • I've just finished reading this compelling biography about one of my favorite authors. I can't it rank five stars, even though I'd like to, because I'm STUNNED by Conn's acrimonious protrayal of Christianity and Protestant missionaries in China. He's totally accepted Pearl's often limited and onesided perceptions, and then gone even further off track. Of course, what both of them say is true to a minute degree, but there's so very much more to the whole picture that they omit. I feel qualified to make this observation since I'm writing a trilogy of novels inspired by my family's century of close ties with China. The first book, based on my grandparents who moved to China in 1892, is entitled Hungry River: A Yangtze Novel, which is now available on Amazon. My father was born in China in 1904, as was I in 1942. I have a son born in Taiwan in 1968. My family rejoices in our international Christian heritage, which joins that of thousands of Chinese. I wonder if Conn is aware that today there may be as many as 80 million Christians in China in spite of decades of horrific persecution? That one statistic alone should be enough to balance his frighteningly negative analysis. In conclusion, I do agree with Conn's evaluation of the place Pearl's writings should have in American and world literature. I hope his biography will help her once more achieve her rightful literary stature. At the same time, I do regret deeply his evaluation does not bring fair balance to her extreme views of Christianity and Protestant missionaries among the Chinese in China. I hope he reads Hungry River!

  • I had read and loved this book. I thought it would be an important additiion to my grand daughters library as she is a senior in college and is intending to teach history to high school age kids.

    I was so dissappointed when the book arrived as this copy was all underlined and full of comments in the margins. I have gotten used books before but have never received one in this condition. I feel that that this book should not have been sold.

    Sincerely, Donna Adams