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ePub Modernist Women Writers and War: Trauma and the Female Body in Djuna Barnes, H.D., and Gertrude Stein download

by Julie Goodspeed-Chadwick

ePub Modernist Women Writers and War: Trauma and the Female Body in Djuna Barnes, H.D., and Gertrude Stein download
Author:
Julie Goodspeed-Chadwick
ISBN13:
978-0807136812
ISBN:
0807136816
Language:
Publisher:
LSU Press; 1 edition (January 1, 2011)
Category:
Subcategory:
History & Criticism
ePub file:
1820 kb
Fb2 file:
1253 kb
Other formats:
lit azw azw lit
Rating:
4.3
Votes:
777

Julie Goodspeed-Chadwick. Modernist women writers were certainly writing about war: Djuna Barnes alluded to war in her masterpiece novel Nightwood and in the notes toward her unfinished memoir; .

Julie Goodspeed-Chadwick. treated both World War I and World War II in her literary output; and Stein returned to war as her primary subject in various genres over a span of twenty years.

Goodspeed-Chadwick begins with Barnes, who in her surrealist novel Nightwood (1936) . first book is a well-balanced scholarly work-appropriately dense yet definitively readable.

In her epic poem Trilogy (1944-1946), .

first book is a well-balanced scholarly work-appropriately dense yet definitively readable.

In Modernist Women Writers and War, Julie Goodspeed-Chadwick examines important avant-garde writings by three American women authors--Djuna Barnes, . and Gertrude Stein-- and shows that during World Wars I and II a new kind of war literature emerged, one in which feminist investigation of war and trauma effectively counters the paradigmatic war experience. long narrated by men. Modernist Women Writers and War. Specifications.

But works by Djuna Barnes, . and Gertrude Stein set in wartime reveal experiences and views of war markedly different from those of male writers. They write women and their bodies into their texts, thus creating space for female war writing, insisting on female presence in wartime, and, perhaps most significantly, critiquing war and patriarchal politics, often in devastating fashion.

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Modernist women writers and war: Trauma and the female body in Djuna Barnes . The strategies employed by Barnes, .

In Modernist Women Writers and War, Julie Goodspeed-Chadwick examines important avant-garde writings by three American women authors and shows that during World Wars I and II a new kind of war literature emerged -- one in which feminist investigation of war and trauma effectively counters the paradigmatic war experience long narrated by men. In the past, Goodspeed-Chadwick explains, scholars have not considered writings by women as part of war literature. They have limited "war writing" to works by men, such as William Butler Yeats's poem "An Irish Airman Foresees His Death" (1919), which relies on a male perspective: a pilot contemplates his forthcoming flight, his duty to his country, and his life in combat. But works by Djuna Barnes, H.D., and Gertrude Stein set in wartime reveal experiences and views of war markedly different from those of male writers. They write women and their bodies into their texts, thus creating space for female war writing, insisting on female presence in wartime, and, perhaps most significantly, critiquing war and patriarchal politics, often in devastating fashion. Goodspeed-Chadwick begins with Barnes, who in her surrealist novel Nightwood (1936) emphasizes the actual perversity of war by placing it in contrast to the purported perverse and deviant behavior of her main characters. In her epic poem Trilogy (1944--1946), H.D. validates female suffering and projects a feminist, spiritual worldview that fosters healing from the ravages of war. Stein, for her part, in her experimental novel Mrs. Reynolds (1952) and her long love poem Lifting Belly (1953), captures her experience of the everyday reality of war on the home front, within the domestic economy of her household. In these works, the female body stands as the primary textual marker or symbol of female identity -- an insistence on women's presence in both the text and in the world outside the book. The strategies employed by Barnes, H.D., and Stein in these texts serve to produce a new kind of writing, Goodspeed-Chadwick reveals, one that ineluctably constructs a female identity within, and authorship of, the war narrative.