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ePub The Arkansas Testament download

by Derek Walcott

ePub The Arkansas Testament download
Author:
Derek Walcott
ISBN13:
978-0374520991
ISBN:
0374520992
Language:
Publisher:
Farrar, Straus and Giroux (September 1, 1988)
Category:
Subcategory:
History & Criticism
ePub file:
1812 kb
Fb2 file:
1790 kb
Other formats:
mobi lit lrf rtf
Rating:
4.8
Votes:
229

THE ARKANSAS TESTAMENT is one of the two most noted books of Walcott's poetry, and it surely was instrumental in the Nobel Committee's decision to award him the Prize for Literature in 1992. It is divided into two nearly equal parts.

THE ARKANSAS TESTAMENT is one of the two most noted books of Walcott's poetry, and it surely was instrumental in the Nobel Committee's decision to award him the Prize for Literature in 1992. The poems of the first part, entitled "Here", are set in Walcott's native Caribbean (many in Saint Lucia).

For several years, Derek Walcott has lived mainly in the United States. The Arkansas Testament," one of the book's long poems, is a powerful confrontation of changing allegiances. The poem's crisis is the taking on of an extra history, one that challenges unquestioning devotion. Read on the Scribd mobile app.

The Arkansas testament. New York : Farrar, Straus and Giroux. inlibrary; printdisabled; ; china. Books for People with Print Disabilities. Internet Archive Books. Uploaded by Tracey Gutierres on August 25, 2014.

Sir Derek Alton Walcott, KCSL, OBE, OCC (23 January 1930 – 17 March 2017) was a Saint Lucian poet and playwright. He received the 1992 Nobel Prize in Literature. He was the University of Alberta's first distinguished scholar in residence, where. He was the University of Alberta's first distinguished scholar in residence, where he taught undergraduate and graduate writing courses. He also served as Professor of Poetry at the University of Essex from 2010 to 2013. His works include the Homeric epic poem Omeros (1990), which many critics view "as Walcott's major achievement

From the arkansas testament (1987). Also by Derek Walcott.

From the arkansas testament (1987).

The Arkansas Testament, Farrar, Straus (New York, NY), 1987. Bloom, Harold, Derek Walcott, Chelsea House (New York, NY), 1988. Omeros, Farrar, Straus (New York, NY), 1990. Collected Poems, Faber (London, England), 1990. Contemporary Literary Criticism, Gale (Detroit, MI), Volume 2, 1974, Volume 4, 1975, Volume 9, 1978, Volume 14, 1980, Volume 25, 1983, Volume 42, 1987, Volume 67, 1992, Volume 76, 1993.

Derek Walcott - Born in 1930, in the West Indies, Derek Walcott received the Nobel Prize in Literature in 1992. Born around 1753, Phillis Wheatley was the first black poet in America to publish a book. Charles Martin was born in New York City in 1942 and grew. A member of the New Formalist movement, Wyatt Prunty is the author of several collections of poetry.

Also by derek walcott. The Arkansas Testament.

New York: Farrar Straus Giroux, 1973. The above writing about Derek Walcott is taken from a certain book. What is the name of the book?

New York: Farrar Straus Giroux, 1973. New York: Farrar Straus Giroux, 1987. What is the name of the book? Please reply it to me as soon as possible.

Derek Walcott's eighth collection of poems, The Arkansas Testament, is divided into two parts--"Here," verse evoking the poet's native Caribbean, and "Elsewhere." It opens with six poems in quatrains whose memorable, compact lines further Walcott's continuous effort to crystallize images of the Caribbean landscape and people.

For several years, Derek Walcott has lived mainly in the United States. "The Arkansas Testament," one of the book's long poems, is a powerful confrontation of changing allegiances. The poem's crisis is the taking on of an extra history, one that challenges unquestioning devotion.

  • "The Light of the World" by itself is worth much more than the price of this beautiful book.

  • A masterpiece, what else?

  • Walcott writes in a loose, readable style that is rich in rhythm (rather than formal meter) and rhyme (often slant rhyme). His imagery is saturated with the islands of the Caribbean, and his themes are introspection and the description of where he is:
    "A panel of sunrise
    on a hillside shop
    gave these stanzas
    their stilted shape."

    The Arkansas Testament is divided into "Here" - the Caribbean - and "Elsewhere", the other places he has lived, taught, travelled. The final poem, "The Arkansas Testament" itself, is 24 stanzas of mostly 16 lines each, a description and reflection of being a non-American person of colour in the 1980s Deep South of the US. Whereas "Here" concerns his return to the roots he left as a young man and is comfortable, familiar and nostalgic, "Elsewhere" deals with his adult life and relationships in a way that is never completely settled and grounded - and "The Arkansas Testament" is the most unsettled and unsettling of all.

    What I like about the book, and especially the first half, is the sense that the imagery and the versification are harmonious with each other, and are a true expression of the life, language and natural rhythms of the islands. Although not meticulous about formal meter and rhyme the way the British can be, he never slides to free verse the way North Americans do. His "Eulogy to W.H. Auden" contains the lovely statement that Auden knew that "war, like free verse, is a sign // of awful manners."

    Walcott's verse is rich, beautiful and memorable. But more, it is a genuinely Caribbean evocation of Caribbean life: people, landscape and history.

  • That's the rueful observation of a poet from Saint Lucia born into a family of mixed race (Derek Walcott's two grandfathers were white; his two grandmothers were black). The economically disadvantaged from the Mediterranean can at least claim a literary heritage, but not those from the Caribbean. Walcott, who recently observed his 83rd birthday, has spent his career exploring the legacy of slavery and colonialism and the problems an intelligent and highly literate person of minority racial lineage (such as himself) faces in today's cosmopolitan world.

    THE ARKANSAS TESTAMENT is one of the two most noted books of Walcott's poetry, and it surely was instrumental in the Nobel Committee's decision to award him the Prize for Literature in 1992. It is divided into two nearly equal parts. The poems of the first part, entitled "Here", are set in Walcott's native Caribbean (many in Saint Lucia). For Walcott, it is a bittersweet homeland, to which he returns as an outsider:

    " * * * This is not the grape-purple Aegean.
    There is no wine here, no cheese, the almonds are green,
    the sea grapes bitter, the language is that of slaves."

    The second part of the book is entitled "Elsewhere", and the various settings of its poems are, of course, outside the Caribbean, including Auschwitz, Germania of Roman times, Wales, Boston, California, and Arkansas. In many of these poems, too, our poisonous history of slavery looms large. In the last poem, which concerns an overnight stay in Fayetteville, Arkansas and whose title is also the title of the entire volume, there are these lines,

    "The original sin is our seed,
    and that acorn fans into an oak;
    the umbrella of Africa's shade,
    despite this democracy's mandates,
    still sprouts from a Southern street
    that holds grey black men in a stoop,
    their flintlock red eyes. * * *"

    "The Arkansas Testament", at fourteen pages, is the longest of the thirty-nine poems in the volume. Three of the poems are less than fourteen lines. Most of the poems are structured to some degree, and many of them feature rhyme, much of which is both subtle and creative. Several of the poems are formal quatrains. The craftsmanship is impressive. But the meaning of many of the poems is elusive. Some are clearly quite personal; others are freighted with literary or cultural references beyond my ken. Almost always I get the mood, but only occasionally do I get the meaning. Still, my reading of THE ARKANSAS TESTAMENT was sufficiently rewarding that I intend to return to it some day and maybe even explore other works by Walcott.

  • I gave this volume to a friend who had no experience of reading poetry (since school, that is), and had asked me what sort of poems he could start with. I pointed out a couple of poems that I thought were highlights, and wished him good luck. When I met up with him a week later, he burst into excited praise for the book. He'd started on the poems I had suggested, and rapidly proceeded to read the whole collection, several times over.

    I quite agree with his response - in my early 20s this was one of the books that got me excited in contemporary poets and poetry. While Walcott is not foremost an experimentalist - and he might at odd moments almost be thought a sentimentalist - his sheer joy of craft and wordsmithing is a beautiful, beautiful thing to behold. This book is one of those things that can remind you why life is worth living. It's that good.