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ePub Abortion, Choice, and Contemporary Fiction: The Armageddon of the Maternal Instinct download

by Judith Wilt

ePub Abortion, Choice, and Contemporary Fiction: The Armageddon of the Maternal Instinct download
Author:
Judith Wilt
ISBN13:
978-0226901589
ISBN:
0226901580
Language:
Publisher:
University of Chicago Press; 1 edition (June 28, 1990)
Category:
Subcategory:
History & Criticism
ePub file:
1224 kb
Fb2 file:
1844 kb
Other formats:
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Rating:
4.8
Votes:
896

Judith Wilt offers the first look at how contemporary writers tell and retell the stories that shape our perceptions about abortion. In the opening of the book, Wilt discusses real case histories of several women.

Judith Wilt offers the first look at how contemporary writers tell and retell the stories that shape our perceptions about abortion. She reveals that the struggle to plot these painful, complex narratives of choice, control, guilt, loss, and liberation has preoccupied an astonishing number of our most distinguished novelists, male and female alike. After studying the ambiguities of their decisions, she turns to their counterpoints depicted in contemporary fiction. She reveals th In recent years, public debate has raged over the issue of maternal choice. While personal testimony and political argument have received widespread attention, artistic representations of birth and abortion have been submerged.

Bibliographic Citation. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1990. Social Aspects of Abortion. EthxWeb: Literature in Bioethics. Показать полную информацию.

Judith Wilt is professor of English at Boston College. Her most recent book,Secret Leaves: The Novels of Walter Scott, is also published by the University of Chicago Press. Hardcover: 198 pages.

A Defense of Abortion" is a moral philosophy paper by Judith Jarvis Thomson first published in Philosophy & Public Affairs in 1971. Granting for the sake of argument that the fetus has a right to life, Thomson uses thought experiments to argue that the fetus's right to life does not trump the pregnant woman's right to have jurisdiction over her body, and that induced abortion is therefore not morally impermissible

Are you sure you want to remove Abortion, choice, and contemporary fiction from . the armageddon of the maternal instinct.

Are you sure you want to remove Abortion, choice, and contemporary fiction from your list? Abortion, choice, and contemporary fiction. Published 1990 by University of Chicago Press in Chicago. Includes bibliographical references (p. 167-179) and index.

Abortion, Choice, and Contemporary Fiction : The Armageddon of the Maternal Instinct. Judith Wilt offers the first look at how contemporary writers tell and retell the stories that shape our perceptions about abortion.

Judith Wilt worked full time as a journalist during her college years at Duquesne University and holds a. .Abortion, Choice, and Contemporary Fiction: The Armageddon of the Maternal Instinct, University of Chicago Press; 1990).

Judith Wilt worked full time as a journalist during her college years at Duquesne University and holds a PhD in English from Indiana University. She taught at Princeton before coming to Boston College in 1978, where she was a founding member of the Women’s Studies Program, chair of the English Department in the 1990’s, and became the Newton College Alumnae Chair in Western Culture in 2002. Secret Leaves: The Novels of Walter Scott (University Of Chicago Press; 1985). She is the author of Ghosts of the Gothic: Austen, Eliot, and Lawrence, Secret Leaves: The Novels of Walter Scott, and Abortion, Choice, and Contemporary Fiction: The Armageddon of the Maternal Instinct

Judith Wilt is Professor of English at Boston College. She is the author of Ghosts of the Gothic: Austen, Eliot, and Lawrence, Secret Leaves: The Novels of Walter Scott, and Abortion, Choice, and Contemporary Fiction: The Armageddon of the Maternal Instinct. Michael Wood is Professor of English Literature at the University of Exeter. Among his publications are Stendhal, America in the Movies, García Márquez: One Hundred Years of Solitude, and numerous essays on fiction and film. He has recently completed a study of Nabokov, and is currently working on a biography of Marcel Proust.

ABORTION, CHOICE, AND CONTEMPORARY FICTION: The Armageddon of the Maternal Instinct (1990). SECRET LEAVES: The Novels of Walter Scott (1985). GHOSTS OF THE GOTHIC: Austen, Eliot, & Lawrence (1980). Women Writers and the Hero of Romance. No reproduction, copy or transmission of this publication may be made without written permission.

In recent years, public debate has raged over the issue of maternal choice. While personal testimony and political argument have received widespread attention, artistic representations of birth and abortion have been submerged. Judith Wilt offers the first look at how contemporary writers tell and retell the stories that shape our perceptions about abortion. She reveals that the struggle to plot these painful, complex narratives of choice, control, guilt, loss, and liberation has preoccupied an astonishing number of our most distinguished novelists, male and female alike. Readers of twentieth-century novels are more likely to encounter plots centered on maternal choice than those dealing with the more traditional problems of courtship and marriage. In the opening of the book, Wilt discusses real case histories of several women. After studying the ambiguities of their decisions, she turns to their counterpoints depicted in contemporary fiction. Working from a feminist perspective, Wilt traces the theme of maternal choice in works by Margaret Atwood, Margaret Drabble, Joan Didion, Mary Gordon, Alice Walker, Toni Morrison, Gloria Naylor, Marge Piercy, Thomas Keneally, Graham Swift, Ernest Hemingway, William Faulkner, John Barth, John Irving, and others. Behind the political, medical, and moral debates on abortion, Wilt argues, is a profound psychocultural shock at the recognition that maternity is passing from the domain of instinct to that of conscious choice. Although never wholly instinctual, maternity's potential capture by consciousness raises complex questions. The novels Wilt discusses portray worlds in which principles are endangered by sexual inequality, male power and hidden male fear of abandonment, impotence, female submission, and covert rage, and, in the case of black maternity, the hideous aftermath of slavery. Wilt provides a resonant new context for debates—whether political or personal—on the issue of abortion and maternal choice. Ultimately she enables us to rethink how we shape our own identities and lives.