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ePub Thinking Animals: Why Animal Studies Now? download

by Kari Weil

ePub Thinking Animals: Why Animal Studies Now? download
Author:
Kari Weil
ISBN13:
978-0231148092
ISBN:
0231148097
Language:
Publisher:
Columbia University Press (May 1, 2012)
Category:
Subcategory:
History & Criticism
ePub file:
1575 kb
Fb2 file:
1436 kb
Other formats:
mbr lrf lrf mobi
Rating:
4.7
Votes:
137

Kari Weil's book is a deeply felt and keenly thought engagement with key philosophical questions animating the exploding scholarly world of 'animal studies

Kari Weil's book is a deeply felt and keenly thought engagement with key philosophical questions animating the exploding scholarly world of 'animal studies. In this graciously written and eminently approachable text, Weil has created a book that will stimulate seasoned scholars and beginning students alike to take up the twenty-first century challenge of taking animals seriously across all realms of academia. This book belongs on bookshelves, and syllabi for courses in philosophy, cultural studies, anthropology, literature, ecology, animal science, and biology.

Kari Weil's book is a deeply felt and keenly thought engagement with key philosophical questions animating the exploding scholarly world of 'animal studies

Kari Weil's book is a deeply felt and keenly thought engagement with key philosophical questions animating the exploding scholarly world of 'animal studies.

Thinking Animals book. Start by marking Thinking Animals: Why Animal Studies Now? as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

Kari Weil investigates the rise of animal studies and its singular reading of literature and . Thinking Animals - Kari Weil.

Kari Weil investigates the rise of animal studies and its singular reading of literature and philosophy through the lens of human-animal relations and difference, providing not only a critical introduction to the field but also an appreciation of its thrilling acts of destabilization. Weil explores the mechanisms we use to build knowledge of other animals, to understand ourselves in relation to other animals, and to represent animals in literature, philosophy, theory, art, and cultural practice.

Kari Weil provides a critical introduction to the field of animal studies as well as an appreciation of its thrilling acts of destabilization. An animal looks at us and we are naked before it. Thinking, perhaps, begins there

Kari Weil provides a critical introduction to the field of animal studies as well as an appreciation of its thrilling acts of destabilization. Examining real and imagined confrontations between human and nonhuman animals, she charts the presumed lines of difference between human beings and other species and the personal, ethical, and political implications of those boundaries. Thinking, perhaps, begins there. These two lines from Jacques Derrida’s The Animal That Therefore I Am have been much cited even as they remain elusive and haunting.

Part I of Kari Weil’s Thinking Animals: Why Animal Studies Now? explores some of the reasons .

Part I of Kari Weil’s Thinking Animals: Why Animal Studies Now . In contrast, Weil traces another direction in animal studies that is. part of the ethical turn in contemporary theory.

Part I of Kari Weil’s Thinking Animals: Why Animal Studies Now? explores. some of the reasons why the question of the animal is so relevant today, focusing. In the first chapter, A Report. varied recent approaches to animal difference. Here she discusses the work of.

Kari Weil provides a critical introduction to the field of animal studies as well as an appreciation of its thrilling acts of destabilization

Kari Weil provides a critical introduction to the field of animal studies as well as an appreciation of its thrilling acts of destabilization. Examining real and imagined confrontations between human and nonhuman animals, she charts the presumed lines of difference between human beings and other species and the personal, ethical, and political implications of those boundaries

Kari Weil provides a critical introduction to the field of animal studies as well as an appreciation of its thrilling acts of destabilization.

Kari Weil provides a critical introduction to the field of animal studies as well as an appreciation of its thrilling acts of destabilization. Examining real and imagined confrontations between human and nonhuman animals, she charts the presumed lines of difference between human beings and other species and the personal, ethical, and political implications of those boundaries. Weil's considerations recast the work of such authors as Kafka, Mann, Woolf, and Coetzee, and such philosophers as Nietzsche, Heidegger, Derrida, Deleuze, Agamben, Cixous, and Hearne, while incorporating the aesthetic perspectives of such visual artists as Bill Viola, Frank Noelker, and Sam Taylor-Wood and the "visual thinking" of the autistic animal scientist Temple Grandin. She addresses theories of pet keeping and domestication; the importance of animal agency; the intersection of animal studies, disability studies, and ethics; and the role of gender, shame, love, and grief in shaping our attitudes toward animals. Exposing humanism's conception of the human as a biased illusion, and embracing posthumanism's acceptance of human and animal entanglement, Weil unseats the comfortable assumptions of humanist thought and its species-specific distinctions.
  • An opposable thumbs up! This is a review of humankind's need to communicate with animals and what animals mean to us. It synthesizes material from our literary history with thoughts from past philosophers. Written in a very clear style, this book is an important tome for those who wish to better understand animal studies.

  • Very well written, condenses some difficult philosophy and critical theory into a useful overview. Great book.

  • Comprehensive introduction to the field of animal studies. Approachable for folks just getting into it (like myself), but challenging enough (I imagine) for those already familiar. I found it easier to get into than Cary Wolfe's "Animal Rites" (which I will now try to finish).