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by C. T. Hsia

ePub A History of Modern Chinese Fiction: Third Edition download
Author:
C. T. Hsia
ISBN13:
978-0253213112
ISBN:
0253213118
Language:
Publisher:
Indiana University Press; Third edition (November 22, 1999)
Category:
Subcategory:
History & Criticism
ePub file:
1205 kb
Fb2 file:
1553 kb
Other formats:
mbr lit docx txt
Rating:
4.7
Votes:
371

These, I am pretty sure.

T. Hsia's book is by now an acknowledged classic. We "The great virtue of this book is that it provides a practical acquaintance with the writing itself by means of copious passages of translation from representative novels. Published November 1st 1999 by Indiana University Press (first published 1961). A History of Modern Chinese Fiction. Jan 28, 2015 Moho100 rated it it was amazing.

In the case of A History of Modern Chinese Fiction, Wang argues that this voluminous work remains relevant although it is much less theory-laden than its counterparts for Western literary texts. Wang observes that Hsia's literary history was controversial in Mainland China due to its perceived hostility to leftist literature. This pioneering, classic study of 20th-century Chinese fictioncovers some sixty years, from the Literary Revolution of 1917 through the CulturalRevolution of 1966-76. We are all in his debt.

Find many great new & used options and get the best deals for A History of Modern Chinese Fiction by C. T. Hsia . Hsia's book is by w an ackwledged classic

T. Hsia's book is by w an ackwledged classic. Leo Lee This pioneering, classic study of 20th-century Chinese fiction covers some sixty years, from the Literary Revolution of 1917 through the Cultural Revolution of 1966-76.

First ed. published in 1961 under title: A history of modern Chinese fiction, 1917-1957. We’re dedicated to reader privacy so we never track you.

A History Of Modern Chinese Fiction also provoked criticism. The Classic Chinese Novel (1968).

Those with an academic interest in Chinese literature are undoubtedly aware of the CT Hsia classic History of Modern Chinese Fiction which has just been reissued by the Chinese University Press. Those who aren’t might find the thought of a 600-page tome of literary criticism to be more than a little daunting; that would be a pity, for the volume is an example of erudition and clarity of expression. A History of Modern Chinese Fiction, CT Hsia (Chinese University Press, September 2016).

Best known for the groundbreaking works A History of Modern Chinese Fiction (1961) .

Best known for the groundbreaking works A History of Modern Chinese Fiction (1961) and The Classic Chinese Novel (1968), C. Hsia has gathered sixteen essays and studies written during his Columbia years as a professor of Chinese literature. Wider in range and scope, C. Hsia on Chinese Literature stands beside his two earlier books as part of his critical legacy to all readers seriously interested in the subject. C. Hsia's writings on Chinese literature express a candor rare among his Western colleagues. The third section is the richest and longest of the book, containing six essays on traditional and early modern fiction.

Informationen zum Titel A History of Modern Chinese Fiction (Dritte Auflage) [mit Kurzbeschreibung und .

Informationen zum Titel A History of Modern Chinese Fiction (Dritte Auflage) C. Leo Lee. This pioneering, classic study of 20th-century Chinese fiction covers some sixty years, from the Literary Revolution of 1917 through the Cultural Revolution of 1966-76.

The great virtue of this book is that it provides a practical acquaintance with the writing itself by means of copious passages of translation from representative novels." ―New York Times Book Review

C. T. Hsia's book is by now an acknowledged classic. It truly opened up a new field and prepared the way for generations of American scholars to do research. We are all in his debt." ―Leo Lee

This pioneering, classic study of 20th-century Chinese fiction covers some sixty years, from the Literary Revolution of 1917 through the Cultural Revolution of 1966-76.

  • I'm of Chinese descent, though I'm now a bona fide Canadian. I have read many classical books about China which are translated into English. I have also read the modern classics, for instance:- The Naked Earth and The Rice Sprout Song by Eileen Chang. Incidentally, the late Ms. Eileen Chang was the grand daughter of the reknown Chinese official named Lee Hung Chang who was once a grand Viceroy of Manchu China (1644-1912). He was nearly assassinated by a Japanese extremist while Viceroy Lee was in Imperial Japan to sign a peace accord. I have had read Prof. C. T. Hsia's definitive analysis, entitled: THE CHINESE NOVEL - a learned review of six classic novels - namely:- Romance of the Three Kingdoms; 108 heroes of the Marshes; Journey to the West; Chin Ping Mei (Golden Lotus); The Scholars; and Dream of the Red Chamber (Hung Lou Meng).

    Undoubtedly, Prof. C.T. Hsia present book: HISTORY OF MODERN CHINESE FICTION will be interesting to read, since I have just ordered a copy.

    His comments are always based on what he has critically read and I am pretty sure that he has no intention, as alleged, to be biased, rude, insulting nor mocking the authors of modern China. Hsia is Chinese and therefore he don't mean to mock or disgrace those authors under his critical review. These, I am pretty sure. Once a Chinese always a Chinese at heart... Need I say more???

    PS: In passing, I have also read works by Ba Jin like: The Family, Spring, and Autumn. My other reading includes Lu Hsun and Mao Tun who wrote the Silk Spring Worm. These are some of the authors reviewed by Prof. C. T. Hsia.

  • When I was in China, I read a review on this book, saying
    C. T. Hsia was funded by C.I.A when writting this book.
    "the book is bias and full of hatry to Communist China" the
    reviewer said, "that is why this book is banned in China".
    I was so curious that the first book I checked out from a U.S.A
    library was this one. I am disappointed since Hsia is really
    bias and sometimes paranoia.
    He really did not understand the huge difficulty all Chinese
    writers faced in the past 100 years. And sometimes I really
    doubt whether he is a Chinese at all? When he sat there laughing
    at Communist writers, did he realize those were of the same
    origin of his parents and himself?
    In this sense, this book is just common, not great, since it
    is lack of love and forgiveness, the basic elements of all great
    works.

  • Reviewer: fjord from Portland, OR United States
    When I was in China, I read a review on this book, saying
    C. T. Hsia was funded by C.I.A when writting this book.
    "the book is bias and full of hatry to Communist China" the
    reviewer said, "that is why this book is banned in China".
    I was so curious that the first book I checked out from a U.S.A
    library was this one. I am disappointed since Hsia is really
    bias and sometimes paranoia.
    He really did not understand the huge difficulty all Chinese
    writers faced in the past 100 years. And sometimes I really
    doubt whether he is a Chinese at all? When he sat there laughing
    at Communist writers, did he realize those were of the same
    origin of his parents and himself?
    In this sense, this book is just common, not great, since it
    is lack of love and forgiveness, the basic elements of all great
    works.