mostraligabue
» » Parables in Midrash: Narrative and Exegesis in Rabbinic Literature

ePub Parables in Midrash: Narrative and Exegesis in Rabbinic Literature download

by David Stern

ePub Parables in Midrash: Narrative and Exegesis in Rabbinic Literature download
Author:
David Stern
ISBN13:
978-0674654471
ISBN:
0674654471
Language:
Publisher:
Harvard University Press; First Edition edition (November 1, 1991)
Category:
Subcategory:
History & Criticism
ePub file:
1129 kb
Fb2 file:
1790 kb
Other formats:
txt lit doc docx
Rating:
4.3
Votes:
738

Parables in Midrash is one of the most sophisticated and mature works on rabbinic literature in this century.

Parables in Midrash is one of the most sophisticated and mature works on rabbinic literature in this century. All readers will find the book an extremely valuable synthesis of cutting-edge methodologies, thorough knowledge of textual traditions, and the best exegesis of traditional literature the academy has to offer. Burton L. Visotzky Catholic Biblical Quarterly). Well-written, comprehensible to the nonexpert and thorough in its description of material and in its use of modern literary criticism. Anthony J. Saldarini Theological Studies).

Parables in Midrash book. Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Start by marking Parables in Midrash: Narrative and Exegesis in Rabbinic Literature as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

Similar books and articles. Midrash and Indeterminacy. Analysis and Argumentation in Rabbinic Judaism. Jacob Neusner - 2003. Midrashic Women Formations of the Feminine in Rabbinic Literature. David Stern - 1988 - Critical Inquiry 15 (1):132-161. Judith Reesa Baskin - 2002. The Eye in the Torah: Ocular Desire in Midrashic Hermeneutic.

Narrative and Exegesis in Rabbinic Literature. David Stern shows how the parable or mashal-the most distinctive type of narrative in midrash-was composed, how its symbolism works, and how it serves to convey the ideological convictions of the rabbis. He describes its relation to similar tales in other literatures, including the parables of Jesus in the New Testament and kabbalistic parables. Through its innovative approach to midrash, this study reaches beyond its particular subject, and will appeal to all readers interested in narrative and religion.

David Stern shows how the parable or mashal - the most distinctive type of narrative in midrash - was composed, how its symbolism works, and how it serves to convey the ideological convictions of the rabbis. Rabbinic Fantasies: Imaginative Narratives from Classical Hebrew Literature (Yale Judaica Series). Midrash and Theory: Ancient Jewish Exegesis and Contempory Literary Studies (Rethinking Theory).

Parables in Midrash: Narrative and Exegesis in Rabbinic Literature. Elsie R. Stern, "Parables in Midrash: Narrative and Exegesis in Rabbinic Literature. David Stern," The Journal of Religion 73, no. 3 (Ju. 1993): 404-405. Of all published articles, the following were the most read within the past 12 months. The Apostle Paul in Arabia. Stephen's Defense before the Sanhedrin.

He is author of Midrash and Theory: Ancient Jewish Exegesis and Contemporary Literary Studies and Parables in Midrash: Narrative and Exegesis in Rabbinic Literature.

352 pages 6 x 9 7 illus. He is author of Midrash and Theory: Ancient Jewish Exegesis and Contemporary Literary Studies and Parables in Midrash: Narrative and Exegesis in Rabbinic Literature. View your shopping cart Browse Penn Press titles in Jewish Studies Join our mailing list.

Rabbinic literature, in its broadest sense, can mean the entire spectrum of rabbinic writings throughout Jewish history

Rabbinic literature, in its broadest sense, can mean the entire spectrum of rabbinic writings throughout Jewish history. However, the term often refers specifically to literature from the Talmudic era, as opposed to medieval and modern rabbinic writing, and thus corresponds with the Hebrew term Sifrut Hazal (Hebrew: ספרות חז"ל‎ "Literature sages," where Hazal normally refers only to the sages of the Talmudic era).

David Stern, Parables in Midrash: Narrative and Exegesis in Rabbinic Literature (Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 1991). 25. This is wonderfully dramatized in the story Genizah by Devorah Baron, Parshiyot: sipurim mequbatsim (Jerusalem: Bialik Institute, 1951), pp. 236–245. Also note to p. 24–425, where the shamash digresses on the rabbi’s championing the mashal as a homiletic tool superior to the rhetoric of reproach (tokheḥah)

narrative and exegesis in rabbinic literature. Published 1991 by Harvard University Press in Cambridge, Mass. Parables in rabbinical literature, Narration in rabbinical literature, Midrash, History and criticism. Includes bibliographical references (p. -335) and indexes. Text in English and appendix B in Hebrew.

Midrash - biblical interpretation as practiced by the rabbinic sages in late antiquity - is both a repository of classical Jewish tradition and a self-defining literary mode. The parable, or mashal, is the most distinctive type of narrative in midrash. David Stern shows how the mashal was composed, how its symbolism works, and how it serves to convey the ideological convictions of the rabbis. He describes its relation to similar tales in other literatures, including the parables of Jesus in the New Testament, and to kabbalistic parables. Drawing upon work in the fields of oral literature and narrative theory and using representative examples from a wide range of classic Jewish texts, all translated into English, he demonstrates how story and exegesis join in midrash to give rabbinic interpretation its unique character. "Parables in Midrash" illuminates a number of issues: the rabbis' conception of God, ancient techniques of representation, the responses of the sages to historical catastrophe, the relationship of rabbinic Judaism to Rome and to early Christianity, and the place of midrash in Jewish tradition. The final chapter traces the history of the mashal from its roots in the ancient Near Eastern fable to its application by modernist writers like Agnon.