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ePub The Lord of the Rings: A Reader's Companion download

by Christina Scull,Wayne G. Hammond

ePub The Lord of the Rings: A Reader's Companion download
Author:
Christina Scull,Wayne G. Hammond
ISBN13:
978-0618642670
ISBN:
0618642676
Language:
Publisher:
Houghton Mifflin Harcourt; 1st Edition edition (December 27, 2005)
Category:
Subcategory:
History & Criticism
ePub file:
1512 kb
Fb2 file:
1641 kb
Other formats:
docx mbr lrf lit
Rating:
4.5
Votes:
708

This spectacular volume, by Wayne G. Hammond and Christina Scull is. .

This spectacular volume, by Wayne G. Hammond and Christina Scull is the ultimate annotated handbook to Tolkien’s work. Reading this book was like opening a window into the heart of a literary genius, whose lifetime of achievements (including other works as well as the cherished Lord of the Rings) continues to inspire, amaze and delight. The reader's companion clarifies some of the chronology of Lord of the Rings and reveals some of the background events that Tolkien privately worked out but did not include in the book.

The Lord of the Rings: A Reader's Companion (2005) is a nonfiction book written by scholars Wayne G. Hammond and Christina Scull. It is an annotated reference to J. R. Tolkien's The Lord of the Rings. Hammond and Scull proceed chapter-by-chapter from the original foreword through to the end of The Lord of the Rings.

In the same note Wayne Hammond and Christina Scull also gave us a good overview of what the book is all about .

In the same note Wayne Hammond and Christina Scull also gave us a good overview of what the book is all about: "This will allow us to discuss the various textual cruces of The Lord of the Rings, to identify changes that have been made to the present text, and to remark any alterations to the published work throughout its history. Little did they know then, that in the 2004 setting still further errors, old and new, would be discovered. Next to the notes "The Lord of the Rings: A Reader's Companion" offers us even more! For example, it starts with a brief history of "The Lord of the Rings", which is very interesting on its own already.

The Lord of the Rings: A Reader's Companion. The Lord of the Rings: A Reader's Companion by Wayne G. Hammond and Christina Scull is considered one of the greatest recent secondary works about . The book contains rare Tolkien-related extracts, poems, letters, manuscripts, interviews, as well as brand new material. Rare or previously unpublished content.

WAYNE G. HAMMOND is a leading expert on Tolkien and coauthor of the acclaimed The Art of The Hobbit by. Tolkien: Artist and Illustrator,The Lord of the Rings: A Reader's Companion, and The . Tolkien Companion and Guide with Christina Scull. These 2 books are from the dynamic duo who brought us the reader's companion on the Lord Of The Rings which is a must have book for a reader of that book whether reading it for the 1st time or for the 30th. Hammond, Christina Scull. With these resources at hand, even the most seasoned reader of The Lord of the Rings will come to a greater enjoyment and appreciation of Tolkien's magnificent achievement. In The Lord of the Rings: A Reader's Companion internationally acclaimed scholars Wayne G. Hammond and Christina Scull examine Tolkien's masterpiece chapter by chapter, offering expert insights into its evolution, structure, and meaning. Результаты поиска по книге. Отзывы - Написать отзыв. A unique insight into the evolution of The Lord of the Rings, detailing how mistakes crept in almost from the first printing, how Tolkien changed the text during his lifetime, posthumous changes made by Christopher Tolkien and a previously unpublished Guide to the Names in The Lord of the Rings, written by Tolkien himself. Since its first publication fifty years ago, The Lord of the Rings has generated an almost unparalleled interest from both fans and critics alike.

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by Wayne G Hammond (Author), Christina Scull (Author). WAYNE G. Tolkien: Artist and Illustrator, The Lord of the Rings: A Reader's Companion, and The . 2 people found this helpful. Hammond, Christina Scull

Wayne G.

In The Lord of the Rings: A Reader's Companion internationally acclaimed scholars Wayne G. Hammond and Christina Scull examine Tolkien's masterpiece chapter by chapter, offering expert insights into its evolution, structure, and meaning. They discuss in close detail important literary and historical influences on the development of The Lord of the Rings, connections between that work and other writings by Tolkien, errors and inconsistencies, significant changes to the text during its fifty years of publication, archaic and unusual words used by Tolkien, and words and passages in his invented languages of Middle-earth. Thousands of notes, keyed to standard editions of The Lord of the Rings but universally accessible, reveal the richness and complexity of one of the most popular works of fiction in our time. In addition to their own expertise and that of other scholars and critics, Hammond and Scull frequently draw upon comments by Tolkien himself, made in letters to family, friends, and enthusiasts, in draft texts of The Lord of the Rings, and in works written in later years which amplify or illuminate characters and events in the story. Extensive reference is made also to writings by Tolkien not previously or widely published, including elaborate time-schemes, an unfinished manuscript index to The Lord of the Rings, and most notably, the important Nomenclature or guide to names in The Lord of the Rings prepared for the use of translators, long out of print and now newly transcribed and printed in its entirety. With these resources at hand, even the most seasoned reader of The Lord of the Rings will come to a greater enjoyment and appreciation of Tolkien's magnificent achievement.
  • This is a great little reference book for people who want to gain a greater and deeper understanding of the The Lord of the Rings. If there where an annotated version of the Lord of the Rings this would be the annotations. Highly recommended and full of interesting info:)

  • Lord of the Rings - a readers companion (2015) - hardcover - 894 pages

    This is the same as the earlier I believe (it might have ammendations - I'll have to see Wayne Hammond's pag eAddenda and Corrigenda page on the earlier Companion)

    Asides from an added paragraph in the Preface it seems the same read. The pages are thinner, and the odd printing mistake from the earlier tome is changed (The Passing of the Grey Company isn't bunched together without spaces)

    Heres my original review:

    I remember when I was at college, struggling to read Ulysses by James Joyce. I had a book of annotations to my side and was struggling to understand chapter 3 of Stephen Dedalus's adventures on the Sandymount Strand in Eire

    This book is rather like that book, but I think its more of a joy to read. Although this book is not for a person who has never read the Story (it will probably give away the ending for a start!) I think its pretty worthwhile for a person whos read the "trilogy" (of SIX Books! in three Volumes!) more than once

    If you've read Lord I think you'll really enjoy this. Its engrossing, and (to be honest) too much in depth (I don't really care to know what words mean in Elvish!)

    So this book works well but you don't have to read EVERY bit. Tolkien was in love with words, names of places and people had to mean something. His pose was as a translator of the work into Westron, the Common Tongue, so you get (for example) Samwises real name in the original text as Banizir

    So I can think the attention to detail can get overwhelming (what Samwises name is in Sindarin, etc).

    I think its a great book, but it can get overwhelming. Tolkien created a history for the work, and as great a book as this is (its the best book I've read on Tolkien, up there with Lord of the Rings actually) it might be best if you just take it in small doses. Listen to the Lord of the Rings on audio cassette and read along with this book

    Again, it helps if you're intimate with the Lord of the Rings. Its not unusual for people to read Lord every year. If you have read it a few times, I think you will really enjoy this book, as its an intelligent, in depth study of the work

    I mean, its 900 pages of annotations, and it has a nice "dip in" quality, and it is an absorbing read

    Just make sure you've read the Lord of the Rings a few times first though, otherwise you might end up throwing the Companion aside in frustration, just because of the attention to detail

    See, Tolkien worked out phases of the moon, dates, and so forth; after Books 1 & 2 (which comprise The Fellowship of the Ring) it becomes convoluted, with Book 3 starting off with Aragorn speeding up the hill of Amon Hen (on February 26) and ending with Pippin riding with Gandalf to Minas Tirith the night of March 5/6 - with different characters at different times throughout that particular Book. By contrast Book 4 (with Frodo and Sam's Mission to Mordor) starts in median res (in the middle of things) at February 28 and ends with the capture of Frodo by old Sauron on late March 13th, a full week later than the end of Book 3 (so the time periods to each book are not always concurrent - that is, starting at the same time and ending at the same)

    So to keep track of moon phases, dates, meanings of words in one huge tome is quite something. Clearly the Lord of the Rings is a matter that got out of hand rather quickly (original drafts of early chapters of Book 1 had the Black Rider originally being Gandalf, comically surprising the hobbits in the Shire - in the comic vein of the earlier book The Hobbit, to which Lord was a sequel; this incident became much darker with Gandalf turning to a Black Rider STALKING the hobbits before they even left the Shire!)

    This book keeps track of events, words (lot of archaic words need to be defined - and not everyone knows that a league is 3 miles!)

    As brilliant a book this is (I've read it once thus far, all the way through) I do have to wonder who its for... As I've said, you can't just pick up this book if you're not really familiar with the Story as you'll get rather cross and fling it aside because you'll be confused about references to Westernesse (aka Numenor) and so forth

    But I think it would help if you had a familiarity with The Silmarillion, even if just reading about it in the excellent Tolkien for Dummies book

    I think reading the Silmarillion might be too much for some people (I found it tedious and not as engrossing as the Lord of the Rings). I do think it would help that you read the Lord of the Rings a least a few times before picking up this work, because it really helps if you know the Lord well. Otherwise this work might be too frustrating a read, and you won't know the world

    Price: 30 pounds
    Pages: 894
    Published: 2015 by HarperCollins Publishers, printed & bound Italy by Lego SpA
    ISBN 978 0 00 755690 8
    UK import

  • As the authors point out in their own introduction, publishing an annotated edition of The Lord of the Rings, complete with the text, was a practical impossibility. Thus was this "Reader's Companion" brought into being. Perhaps not so intuitive and casual to use (as is, say, Douglas Anderson's "Annotated Hobbit") with a separate copy of LOTR, but at nearly 1200 pages, and with this Companion running over 900 pages, you can easily see why Hammond and Scull and their publishers chose to go this route. As a single volume such a thing might be used to stun a Warg!

    As a guide, index, and explicatory text, LOTR: A Reader's Companion excels and exceeds expectations. It is very nearly exhaustive, without being exhausting (as such a book might easily have been). Rigorous and of real use to the serious scholar and academic, but readiy accessible and fun to read for the general Tolkien reader who takes pleasure in going deeper into the story, the backstory, and the life of Tolkien and his greatest tale.

    LOTR: A Reader's Companion is as well a clear and well organized accesory volume. Much easier to use than most supplemental guides, it is keyed chapter-by-chapter, and page-by-page to the main text (I have 7 editions of LOTR, paper and hardcover, single-volume and sets, and finding the passage referred to in this Reader's Companion is quick and easy in most cases, as is finding appropriate entries in the RC while reading LOTR and coming across an item you want to know more about). I strongly recommend this book to any reader who has or will read LOTR more than once. It is addictive and fun to read all by itself, and deeply informing when read side-by-side with its source.

    The book itself is a sturdy, handsome, well put together piece of publishing. A nicely utilitarian, simple, but still elegant cloth binding, with bright foil stamped spine, and a jacket with a plasticized lining, which will make it stand many more hours and years of handing and reading than most paper backed jackets. The paper is excellent stock, of moderate weight in a very pale cream tone. The print is crisp, dark, and thoroughly consistent throughout (which is becoming something rare even in quality hardcovers recently), and the type is a pleasing traditional serif face of good size, and easy to read. Not certainly a self-consciously "fine" or "collector's" edition, but as definately a book that will last and put up with use, and nonetheless has been designed with care and concern for the craft of book-making.

    I own it, and I recommend this "Companion" to all interested readers and their libraries, small and large. With Foster's "Complete Guide to Middle-earth" and Christopher Tolkien's "History of Middle-earth", Wayne Hammond and Christina Scull shall have an equal position (to say: even somewhat superior as regards LOTR in particular, where the other two authors' work is more widely focused on the entire legendarium and body of JRRT's work). My only cavil, and I think it slight, is the absence of photos, drawings, publishing ephemera, and other graphicals, which were so prominent and vital in Anderson's "Annotated Hobbit". But: Buy it! Read it! You'll delight in it! It will enlarge your understanding and pleasure each time you read LOTR, whole or part.

  • very good for info a must have to get deeper into the story

  • I've read The Lord of the Rings at least once a year for 47 years. Although I knew many of the things noted, the ones I didn't added a new dimension when I read it this year.