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by Anthony Trollope,W. J. McCormack,Blair Hughes-Stanton

ePub The Eustace Diamonds (The World's Classics) download
Author:
Anthony Trollope,W. J. McCormack,Blair Hughes-Stanton
ISBN13:
978-0192815880
ISBN:
0192815881
Language:
Publisher:
Oxford University Press (February 9, 1984)
Category:
Subcategory:
History & Criticism
ePub file:
1270 kb
Fb2 file:
1730 kb
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Rating:
4.1
Votes:
252

It is the third of the "Palliser" series of novels.

It is the third of the "Palliser" series of novels. In this novel, the characters of Plantagenet Palliser, his wife Lady Glencora and their uncle the ailing Duke of Omnium are in the background. The plot centres on Lizzie Greystock, a fortune-hunter who ensnares the sickly, dissipated Sir Florian Eustace and is soon left a very wealthy widow and mother.

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Anthony Trollope's celebrated Parliamentary novels, of which 'The Eustace Diamonds' is the third and most famous, are at once unfailingly amusing social comedies, melodramas of greed and deception.

Anthony Trollope's celebrated Parliamentary novels, of which 'The Eustace Diamonds' is the third and most famous, are at once unfailingly amusing social comedies, melodramas of greed and deception, and precise nature studies of the political animal in its mid-victorian habitat. With its purloined jewels, its conniving, resilient, mercenary heroine, and its partiality for the human spectacle in all its complexity.

item 1 The Eustace Diamonds (World's Classics)-Anthony Trollope, W. .Blair Hughes- Stanton. Country of Publication.9780195208979 -The Eustace Diamonds (World's Classics)-Anthony Trollope, W.item 2 The Eustace Diamonds (World's Classics),Anthony Trollope, W. J . 780195208979 -The Eustace Diamonds (World's Classics),Anthony Trollope, W. 780195208979. item 3 The Eustace Diamonds (World's Classics) By Anthony Trollope -The Eustace Diamonds (World's Classics) By Anthony Trollope.

Anthony Trollope The Eustace Diamonds (The World's Classics). The third in Trollope's six-volume Palliser series, The Eustace Diamonds boasts an extraordinary heroine in Lizzie Eustace, a lying schemer in the mould of Thackeray's Becky Sharp. ISBN 13: 9780192815880. The Eustace Diamonds (The World's Classics). A pompous Under-Secretary of State, an exploitative and acquisitive American and her unhappy "niece," a shady radical peer, and a brutal aristocrat are only some of the characters in this, one of Trollope's most engaging novels: part sensation fiction, part detective story, part political satire, and part ironic romance.

Title: The Eustace Diamonds (Worlds Classics) Item Condition: used item in a good condition. Author: Anthony Trollope, W. McCormack, Blair Hughes-Stanton ISBN 10: 0192815881. Genre: ClassicsFormat: PaperbackAuthor: Anthony Trollope. Phineas Redux (World's Classics),Anthony Trollope, John C. Whale, .

The Eustace Diamonds (1873) is the third in the Palliser series. Though often considered the least political of the six, it is a highly revealing study of Victoran Britain, its colonial activities in Ireland, India, and Australia, and its veneration of wealth. Издание: иллюстрированное, перепечатанное, переиздание.

e they are in Parliament. Lucinda had liked Frank, and said so very boldly. I see what it is,’ replied Sir Griffin, ‘you always like the people I don’t’ When he was going, Lizzie left her hand in his for a moment, and gave one look up into his eyes. When is Lucy to be made blessed?’ she asked

The third in Trollope's six-volume Palliser series, The Eustace Diamonds boasts an extraordinary heroine in Lizzie Eustace, a lying schemer in the mould of Thackeray's Becky Sharp. A pompous Under-Secretary of State, an exploitative and acquisitive American and her unhappy "niece," a shady radical peer, and a brutal aristocrat are only some of the characters in this, one of Trollope's most engaging novels: part sensation fiction, part detective story, part political satire, and part ironic romance. It is also a highly revealing study of Victorian Britain, its colonial activities in Ireland and India, its veneration of wealth, and its pervasive dishonesty. In her introduction, Helen Small explores the central themes of lying and truth-telling, placing the novel within contemporary political and social debates. An invaluable appendix outlines the political context of the Palliser novels and establishes the internal chronology of the series and the relationship between fictional and actual political events, providing a unique understanding of the series as a linked narrative. In addition, the book includes a compact biography of Trollope and a wealth of explanatory notes. About the Series: For over 100 years Oxford World's Classics has made available the broadest spectrum of literature from around the globe. Each affordable volume reflects Oxford's commitment to scholarship, providing the most accurate text plus a wealth of other valuable features, including expert introductions by leading authorities, voluminous notes to clarify the text, up-to-date bibliographies for further study, and much more.
  • As the dreadful tumult of the Napoleonic era drew to a close in the second decade of the 19th Century, there were born within a few years of each other half a dozen great English novelists: Charles Dickens, William Thackeray, Anthony Trollope and the three Bronte sisters, Anne, Emily and Charlotte. Together with the great novelist Jane Austen who was born a generation earlier, they would utterly dominate the literature of 19th Century England, producing dozens of classics that still delight the world to this day. Typically their heroes – and especially their heroines – were modest, truthful, devout and usually long-suffering, models of virtue and humble grace. True love always was crowned with nuptial garlands and property, meaning money and material prosperity, usually also flowed to the hero and heroine, who lived blissfully ever after.

    But not always. Anthony Trollope’s novels feature heroes and heroines who were more complicated amalgams of virtues and flaws, and in many ways they are more realistic and interesting as a result. But probably none of them was as deeply shocking as The Eustace Diamonds. It tells the disturbing tale of Lizzie Greystock, who calculatingly marries a Sir Florian Eustace who is dying of tuberculosis, to inherit his wealth and lift herself out of the genteel poverty she cannot bear. He duly passes away, leaving her a wealthy widow and leaving her also the fabulously valuable diamond necklace referred to in the title, which immediately becomes the subject of a long-running dispute between her and her late husband’s family. She married crassly for money and greedily clings to it, and to the family jewels, through all the twists and turns of this delightfully acidic romp through high-Victorian society.

    How scandalized the reading public of the time was by a main female character, who was so suavely repulsive. Her own aunt denounces her with the contempt born of familiarity: "She's about as bad as anybody ever was. She's false, dishonest, heartless, cruel, irreligious, ungrateful, mean, ignorant, greedy, and vile!" The wealthy widow spends much of this long book, trying to decide which of four possible husbands, all of whom need to marry money as she herself had done, would be most to her calculated matrimonial advantage. Lord Fawn has his tile and a fairly high position in Government, but he is snobbish and a booby. Her cousin Frank, who is the hero of book, has no title but is a good man who has bright prospects as a barrister; unfortunately, he is already engaged to a modest and likable woman, but this of course does not stop Lizzie.

    The third penniless candidate is Lord George, a rakish and despicable rogue who brings a sense of adventure as well as his title. And fourth comes Mr. Emilius, a scheming and disreputable clergyman. And here Trollope really shocks again – portraying a man of the cloth as unscrupulous and repulsive would have been deeply shocking to a contemporary audience. But Lizzie is intrigued by him nonetheless. Here is her view of him: “…he was a greasy, fawning, pawing, creeping, black-browed rascal, who could not look her full in the face, and whose every word sounded like a lie...There was an oily pretense at earnestness in his manner which ought to have told her that he was not fit to associate with gentlemen." Can you imagine?

    It is a rollicking, many-faceted story of the great folly of marrying for money and of the resounding sin that lying is, shaking human relationships to their core. The Eustace Diamonds is a delicious dark comedy, with outrageous plot developments; the story twists and turns like a rattlesnake on its fascinating mission of malice. And yet, outraged propriety is rescued at the end, the scoundrels all get their just deserts, the few good people in this rollicking story find their way safely home in the end. It will make you a Trollope fan forever.

  • I suppose one should not criticize an author who cannot response from beyond the grave, so I should begin with the good sides. First, anyone who loves Victorian London (or what's left of it) will enjoy reading the book for the historical geography. Anyone who has spent time walking in the West End can close his or her eyes and let memory and imagination provide the illustrations the book lacks. Second, some will enjoy the author's asides, which explain how he is trying to reinvent the novel's concept of heroes and heroines, villains and villainesses by giving all characters darker and lighter sides. Third, I enjoyed his criticism of the Victorian class systems--the necessity of not marrying out of one's class and the perpetual chase after wealth. Fourth, the use of satire in the names of characters, such as the clinging Mrs. Carbuncle, the ultra-critical Mrs Hittaway, and cowardly Lord Faun . Fifth, Trollope's occasional support of the woman's point of view.

    The very bad side? Trollope displays the rampant antisemitism present in Victorian England. The villain-in-chief is a jeweler who is Jewish. When described, his features contain all the stereotypes, and adjectives like dirty appear frequently. Even a Church of England Minister, an emigre from Eastern Europe is called a false Christian who uses his preaching skills to boost his income. He is suspected of really being "a filthy Jew" who wants to marry Lizzie Eustace for her money and class position. His voice is described as oily and his hair as greasy--you get the idea. The picture of society is true to the times, disgusting as it may be.

  • What a waste of $27.95! I was looking for a great hard copy of a classic and I got junk. As my pictures show, they took a library book and copied it and bound the copy. So, you have a huge, heavy book with small copies of tiny font from an old library book. Many of the pages are greyed out (from copying errors?) rendering them even more unreadable. What a rip off! I plan to complain to Amazon. Don't waste your money buying anything from this vendor, buy from a reputable publisher instead.

  • One does get tired of Lizzie' endless defense of her right to the diamonds and, as usual, Trollope reiterates too much of the plot. He could never be accused of leaving his reader forgetful of the plot or main characters. I have always found Trollope capable of creating the most unsympathetic players in his stories. To this charge, he answers: Who of us knows any true heroes with hearts of gold, whom you would trust at all times, and always spoke the truth, and performed honorably in all situations? So, he says he is only being honest. I will grant him this, since I continue reading him with fascination. As for the tedium, one can always skim. Some interesting 19th century British views on inheritance and heirloom regulations -- issues of significant concern to the pressured aristocratic class of the day.

  • Lots of notable quotes that I both enjoyed and made me 'think' in this British literature classic including passages like “The persons whom you cannot care for in a novel, because they are so bad, are the very same that you so dearly love in your life, because they are so good .” and "To be alone with the girl to whom he is not engaged is a man's delight; - to be alone with the man to whom she is engaged is the woman's." Fine book in and of itself or look for it as part of the Palliser ebooks for an even better bargain. Very good book!