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by Francois Voltaire,Theodore Besterman

ePub Philosophical Dictionary (Penguin Classics) download
Author:
Francois Voltaire,Theodore Besterman
ISBN13:
978-0140442571
ISBN:
014044257X
Language:
Publisher:
Penguin Classics; Revised ed. edition (March 6, 1984)
Category:
Subcategory:
History & Criticism
ePub file:
1857 kb
Fb2 file:
1249 kb
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Rating:
4.5
Votes:
224

Philosophical Dictionary (Penguin Classics) Paperback – March 6, 1984. Voltaire (born November 22, 1694 and named François-Marie Arouet) published this book in 1764

Philosophical Dictionary (Penguin Classics) Paperback – March 6, 1984. by Francois Voltaire (Author), Theodore Besterman (Translator, Introduction). Voltaire (born November 22, 1694 and named François-Marie Arouet) published this book in 1764. Voltaire’s original footnotes are included as translated by Besterman. I found this translation to be easily readable.

Voltaire's Philosophical Dictionary is not what one would necessarily expect of a 'philosophical' work and it is. .Philosophical Dictionary Penguin classics. Перевод: Theodore Besterman.

Voltaire's Philosophical Dictionary is not what one would necessarily expect of a 'philosophical' work and it is certainly not a dictionary in the common understanding of the term; it is in fact a. 0141915218, 9780141915210.

The Dictionnaire philosophique (Philosophical Dictionary) is an encyclopedic dictionary published by Voltaire in 1764. The alphabetically arranged articles often criticize the Roman Catholic Church, Judaism, Islam, and other institutions. It was 344 pages and consisted of 73 articles. Later versions were expanded into two volumes consisting of 120 articles.

By Francois Voltaire Introduction by Theodore Besterman Translated by Theodore .

By Francois Voltaire Introduction by Theodore Besterman Translated by Theodore Besterman. By Francois Voltaire Introduction by Theodore Besterman Translated by Theodore Besterman. François-Marie Arouet, writing under the pseudonym Voltaire, was born in 1694 into a Parisian bourgeois family. Educated by Jesuits, he was an excellent pupil but one quickly enraged by dogma. People Who Read Philosophical Dictionary Also Read.

Francois Voltaire, Theodore Besterman. Voltaire's Philosophical Dictionary, first published in 1764, is a series of short, radical essays - alphabetically arranged - that form a brilliant and bitter analysis of the social and religious conventions that then dominated eighteenth-century French thought. One of the masterpieces of the Enlightenment, this enormously influential work of sardonic wit - more a collection of essays arranged alphabetically, than a conventional dictionary - considers such diverse subjects as Abraham and Atheism, Faith and Freedom of Thought, Miracles and Moses.

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Philosophical Dictionary. Imprint: Penguin Classics. Published: 27/09/1979.

Author: Francois Voltaire. Philosophical Dictionary. It also considers such diverse subjects as Abraham and Atheism, Faith and Freedom of Thought, and, Miracles and Moses. item 4 Philosophical Dictionary (Classics) by Voltaire, Francois Paperback Book The -Philosophical Dictionary (Classics) by Voltaire, Francois Paperback Book The. £. 6. item 5 Philosophical Dictionary (Classics) by Voltaire, Francois Paperback Book The -Philosophical Dictionary (Classics) by Voltaire, Francois Paperback Book The. Philosophy & Psychology.

Voltaire Philosophical Dictionary - arm VOLTAIRE. School University of California, Los Angeles

Voltaire Philosophical Dictionary - arm VOLTAIRE. School University of California, Los Angeles. The assassins of duite Francois de Guise, of William, prince of Orange, of king Henry III and king Henry IV, and so many others, were energumens suffering from the same madness as Diaz. The most detestable example of fanaticism is that of the bourgeois of Paris who hastened in saint Bartholomew’s night to assassinate, butcher, throw out of the windows, cut in pieces their fellow citizens who did not go to mass. J There are coid~blooded fanatics: these are the judges who condemn to death those guilty of no other crime than that of.

Voltaire's Philosophical Dictionary, first published in 1764, is a series of short, radical essays - alphabetically arranged - that form a brilliant and bitter analysis of the social and religious conventions that then dominated eighteenth-century French thought. One of the masterpieces of the Enlightenment, this enormously influential work of sardonic wit - more a collection of essays arranged alphabetically, than a conventional dictionary - considers such diverse subjects as Abraham and Atheism, Faith and Freedom of Thought, Miracles and Moses. Repeatedly condemned by civil and religious authorities, Voltaire's work argues passionately for the cause of reason and justice, and criticizes Christian theology and contemporary attitudes towards war and society - and claims, as he regards the world around him: 'common sense is not so common'.
  • Voltaire (born November 22, 1694 and named François-Marie Arouet) published this book in 1764. This edition includes a brief “Chronology” or timeline of events in Voltaire’s life, an introduction by the translator and editor, and footnotes added by the translator. (Voltaire’s original footnotes are included as translated by Besterman.)

    I found this translation to be easily readable. I especially appreciated Besterman’s many footnotes that provide historical context to Voltaire’s observations, such as that in the entry “Chinese catechism,” which informs the reader that European knowledge of the far east was “scanty and inaccurate” in Voltaire’s lifetime. Also, Besterman, via his own footnotes, reminds us at various points that Voltaire’s words should not be taken too literally. He is often speaking in an ironic, and sometimes, sarcastic sense. Many entries end with an attribution of the entry to some other author. For example, the entry “Abraham” is attributed to one Nicolas Fréret. Besterman informs us that this was “merely part of Voltaire’s prudential campaign of pretense that the Dictionnaire philosophique was a collective work.” (p. 20) It was prudent for Voltaire to distance himself from some of his more controversial opinions because he could be arrested, tortured, and killed if he offended either the church or the crown.

    This is a book that can be read in any order you wish. Pick it up, open to a random page, and pick the first topic that appears. Start reading. Skip entries that do not interest you. I, of course, being a little obsessed with order, felt compelled to read the dictionary from beginning to end. Every entry was fascinating. But I found the entry “Fanaticism” to be almost chilling in its relevance to today’s events. Voltaire writes there, “How can you answer a man who tells you that he would rather obey god than men, and who is therefore sure to deserve heaven in cutting your throat?” (p. 203) One thinks of the fanatics that call themselves the Islamic State. But if you leave off the part about cutting throats, it could also apply to certain American politicians.

    I don’t think Voltaire felt any obligation to cover every aspect of philosophy in his dictionary. I found no entries for scholasticism or stoicism, for example. I think he just wrote a brief essay on any topic that sparked his interest and then filed it away for later inclusion in his dictionary. So, Philosophical Dictionary is really a collection of essays arranged in alphabetical order by topic. The lengths of these essays range from a few paragraphs to twenty-five pages.

    The majority of the topics concern religion: Abraham, Angel, Atheism, Baptism, Christianity (one of the longest essays), Soul, Transubstantiation, etc. In his topics on biblical events, Voltaire’s first question is did the alleged event occur? Of course, even posing such a question about sacred scripture in print in 18th century France could get a writer in deep trouble. The Dictionary ended up on the Vatican’s Index of Forbidden Books.
    This particular paperback edition is cheaply printed. In some words, for example, the loop in lower case letter “e” is filled in so that it looks like a “c”. The same blotting affects the loop in the lower case “a”. Superscripted numerals (for footnotes) sometimes look like little blots of ink. Only context allows you to deduce what number was intended. The poor print was not a serious obstacle to reading, but it makes for an ugly typeface.

  • I have just finished reading Durant's history of Voltaire and decided that I wanted to read more of his actual writings. I have previously read Candide and some of his letters and really appreciated the biting satire.

    This version is actually a condensed version of over 300 pages. I found a copy of the original in 6 volumes at over 300 pages each. This work is a `dictionary' arranged in alphabetical order. The subjects he chooses are seemingly random and include such things as `beauty', `corn', `envy', `Joan of Arc', and almost any other thing you can think of.

    I found many of the articles to be dated and not very `philosophical', but many others were fascinating. I enjoyed his views on the soul, atheism, and free-will. They were clearly philosophical and were probably considered radical at the time. Many of his radical views are now considered mainstream, but some are still bound to offend. His satire was not as biting as some of his other works, but it still probably caused offence to many of his contemporaries.

    I was somewhat disappointed that this was a condensed version, but I still appreciated the opportunity to read more from Voltaire in a Kindle freebie.

  • I enjoyed Voltaire all throughout college and vowed to read more of his works after I graduated college and could once again read materials that I wanted to read.

    I was almost turned off and put the book away after reading so much anti-semitic writings. Then, I took it with a grain of salt, understood that Voltaire was no different from his fellow man on the matter (in the 1700s) so I just kept reading.

    I am glad that I did for his attacks rolled away from the Jews to many more subjects. A delightful read with a tinge of missogyny, deism, anti-semitism and of course a few old and outdated ideas like these.

    What is more important is that Voltaire's writings influenced the Jacobin revolution that swept Europe after it devoured France. Kudos Voltaire!

  • I purchased this book because I wanted to know more about this great writer of the 18th century. This book is full of history, you learn lots of stuff about religion and the origin of some words and, of course, you always find his particular humor.

    I really enjoyed his reflections over religion and undoubtedly, this is a good book to read and grow in knowledge.

  • FINE

  • The Satire of Voltaire on the religious teachings of the Old and New Testament is witty, and thought provoking. He points out the absurdities of God's behavior in the Old Testament. And he does much more

  • While I, too, enjoyed getting a Kindle freebie, this bears little resemblance to the original (I am fortunate to have a first English edition from 1765). I was hoping to have a Kindle version much like the printed copy, but found that many of his more enjoyable and interesting topics (especially religious) were omitted by your editors including Abraham, Angel, Baptism, Beasts, Body, Chinese and Japanese Catachism, Christianity -- the list goes on and on. Why such a different version might have been explained with your translator/transcriber notes in the Kindle version.

  • We think Mr Joseph Campbell was an origional but you need only read some of Mr Voltaire's works to see that brilliance is not something that is only seen in our time.
    The only bothering part of this book is the accepted prejudice of the time. I wonder if Mr. Voltaire was actually just spouting what the Catholic church wanted to hear at the time to keep from being persicuted