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by Cedar Paul,Eden Paul,Stefan Zweig

ePub The Struggle with the Daemon: Hölderlin, Kleist and Nietzsche download
Author:
Cedar Paul,Eden Paul,Stefan Zweig
ISBN13:
978-1906548865
ISBN:
1906548862
Language:
Publisher:
Pushkin Press (September 18, 2012)
Category:
Subcategory:
History & Criticism
ePub file:
1468 kb
Fb2 file:
1993 kb
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Rating:
4.3
Votes:
729

Stefan Zweig cherished the everyday imperfections and frustrated aspirations of the men and women he analysed with such . His stories and novellas were collected in 1934.

Stefan Zweig cherished the everyday imperfections and frustrated aspirations of the men and women he analysed with such affection and understanding. Paul Bailey, Times Literary Supplement. Stefan Zweig (1881-1942) was born in Vienna, a member of a wealthy Austrian-Jewish family. He studied in Berlin and Vienna and was first known as a poet and translator, then as a biographer. Zweig travelled widely, living in Salzburg between the wars, and enjoyed literary fame.

Zweig studies three giants of German literature and thought: Friedrich Hölderlin, Heinrich von Kleist, and Friedrich . Born in Vienna in 1881, Stefan Zweig travelled widely, living in Salzburg, Austria, between the wars.

Zweig studies three giants of German literature and thought: Friedrich Hölderlin, Heinrich von Kleist, and Friedrich Nietzsche-powerful minds whose ideas were at odds with the scientific positivism of their age; troubled spirits whose intoxicating passions drove them mad but inspired them to great works. He enjoyed worldwide literary fame, first as a poet and translator, then as a biographer.

Stefan Zweig, Eden Paul, Paul Cedar. Struggles with the Daemon is a brilliant analysis of the European psyche by the great novelist and biographer Stefan Zweig. Zweig studies three giants of German literature and thought: Friedrich Holderlin, Heinrich von Kleist and Friedrich Nietzsche - powerful minds whose ideas were at odds with the scientific positivism of their age; troubled spirits whose intoxicating passions drove them mad but inspired them to great works

Paul Bailey, Times Literary Supplement. About the Author Zweig uses Goethe and Kant throughout to highlight the contrast of the volcanic poets with the mechanical scientists.

Paul Bailey, Times Literary Supplement. Zweig uses Goethe and Kant throughout to highlight the contrast of the volcanic poets with the mechanical scientists. Learned more about modern contrasts than I anticipated (heavy metal vs Lawerance Welk). I couldn’t connect with Zweig’s essay on Kleist. Don’t know anything about him.

Stefan Zweig, Cedar Paul (Translator). M. Eden Paul (Translator). Published June 7th 2012 by Plunkett Lake Press. Author(s): Stefan Zweig, Cedar Paul (Translator).

Stefan Zweig’s literary portraits of three tormented giants of German . Books related to The Struggle with the Daemon: Hölderlin, Kleist, Nietzsche.

Stefan Zweig’s literary portraits of three tormented giants of German literature, Friedrich Hölderlin, Heinrich von Kleist, and Friedrich Nietzsche, contrasts them with Goethe who was anchored in place by profession, home and family. In these essays, Zweig depicts the tragic and sublime lifelong struggle by three great creative minds with their respective daemons.

In Struggle with the Daemon Stefan Zweig studies three giants of German literature and thought: Friedrich Hoelderlin, Heinrich von Kleist and Friedrich Nietzsche - powerful minds whose ideas were at odds with the scientific.

In Struggle with the Daemon Stefan Zweig studies three giants of German literature and thought: Friedrich Hoelderlin, Heinrich von Kleist and Friedrich Nietzsche - powerful minds whose ideas were at odds with the scientific positivism of their age; troubled spirits whose intoxicating passions drove them mad but inspired them to great works. Read full description. See details and exclusions. See all 11 brand new listings. The Struggle with the Daemon: Holderlin, Kleist and Nietzsche by Stefan Zweig (Paperback, 2012). Brand new: lowest price.

Zweig studies three giants of German literature and thought: Friedrich Ho lderlin, Heinrich von Kleist and Friedrich Nietzsche - powerful minds whose ideas were at odds with the scientific positivism of their age; troubled spirits whose intoxicating passions drove them mad but inspired.

Zweig studies three giants of German literature and thought: Friedrich Ho lderlin, Heinrich von Kleist and Friedrich Nietzsche - powerful minds whose ideas were at odds with the scientific positivism of their age; troubled spirits whose intoxicating passions drove them mad but inspired them to great works. In their struggle with their inner creative force, Zweig reflects the conflict at the heart of the European soul - between science and art, reason and inspiration

In Hölderlin, Kleist, and Nietzsche, Zweig concentrates on three giants of German literature to portray the artist and thinker as a figure possessed by a powerful inner vision at odds with the materialism and scientific positivism of his time, in this case, the nineteenth century.

In Hölderlin, Kleist, and Nietzsche, Zweig concentrates on three giants of German literature to portray the artist and thinker as a figure possessed by a powerful inner vision at odds with the materialism and scientific positivism of his time, in this case, the nineteenth century. Zweig's subjects here are respectively a lyric poet, a dramatist and writer of novellas, and a philosopher. Each led an unstable life ending in madness and/or suicide and not until the twentieth century did each make their full impact.

Zweig studies three giants of German literature and thought: Friedrich Holderlin, Heinrich von Kleist and Friedrich Nietzsche – powerful minds whose ideas were at odds with the scientific positivism of their age; troubled spirits whose intoxicating passions drove them mad but inspired them to great works. In their struggle with their inner creative force, Zweig reflects the conflict at the heart of the European soul – between science and art, reason and inspiration.

The Struggle with the Daemon is a brilliant analysis of the European psyche by the great novelist and biographer Stefan Zweig. Zweig studies three giants of German literature and thought: Friedrich Holderlin, Heinrich von Kleist and Friedrich Nietzsche – powerful minds whose ideas were at odds with the scientific positivism of their age; troubled spirits whose intoxicating passions drove them mad but inspired them to great works. In their struggle with their inner creative force, Zweig reflects the conflict at the heart of the European soul – between science and art, reason and inspiration.Both highly personal and philosophically wide-ranging, this is one of the most fascinating of Zweig’s renowned biographical studies.
  • This book is the second volume of a remarkable trilogy Master Builders: An Attempt at the Typology of the Spirit, each volume of which presents essays on three European writers, and is thus a trilogy within a trilogy. Volume one deals with Balzac, Dickens, and Dostoevsky; volume three deals with Casanova, Stendhal, and Tolstoy. This, the second volume, presents Hölderlin, Kleist, and Nietzsche under the title The Struggle with the Daemon.
    The text is unsupported by the usual academic buttresses: there is no citation of referenced works, no bibliography, and no appendices. Quotations are often unacknowledged or described casually as "from a letter" and, apart from a head-and-shoulders portrait of each writer, graphical illustrations are absent. Readers expecting standard literary biographies will be disappointed, as will those looking for a systematic analysis of each writer's works. Despite these seeming shortcomings, the essays succeed as brilliant fantasias written by a once celebrated but now relatively neglected story teller, Stephan Zweig, and expertly translated by Eden and Cedar Paul.
    Biographical details and literary insights abound but readers are expected to be generally familiar with each writer's life and works. A clue to what the trilogy is designed to do is given by the dedication of the second volume: to Sigmund Freud. Zweig's technique is to distil biographical and critical facts into a concentrated narrative of his own from which a psychological portrait of each subject emerges.
    Readers of this volume are treated to an exhilarating and deeply sympathetic account of the development of three writers who, despite enormous differences in style, form, and audience, were all reduced to tragic circumstances by refusing to compromise their intellectual principles.
    Daemonic is defined as "the unrest that is within us all, driving each of us out of himself into the elemental" and the three featured writers - one poet, one dramatist and short story writer, one philosopher - all have "mentalities of like complexion" in that they persist in their attempt to reach a plane of existence higher than the familiar world of conventional values and behaviour, preferring to be neglected by their contemporaries rather than compromise their ambitions.
    The result is a moving account of Hölderlin's descent from the poetical stratosphere to the humiliation of living in community care as the madman Scardanelli, Kleist's short life of confused wanderings in search of the vital but elusive truth he needed to make sense of existence, which ended in his suicide pact with Henriette Vogel, and Nietzsche's youthful revolt against the comfortable security of a professorship in philology to become the scourge of European thought with a series of iconoclastic works followed by a cataclysmic descent into insanity.
    To counterpoise these tumultuous psyches, Zweig provides the calming contrast of Goethe. The featured writers are, to use Nietzsche's dichotomy, Dionysian, whereas Goethe is Apollonian. Against the dizzying extremes of Hölderlin, Kleist, and Nietzsche is laid the calm and rational ground bass of Goethe, the world's favourite polymath.
    Such stimulating concentrations of thought are rare in today's glut of undigested ephemera. In reading this remarkable volume we should keep in mind that, despite the obvious risks of the Dionysian psyche, Nietzsche's philosophy is consistently life-affirming.

  • my first foray into the work of stefan zweig. it seems clear that not only was he a great writer, but his incisive and penetrating insights into the minds of hölderlin, kleist, and nietzsche make him a great psychologist as well. looking forward to reading the mental healers next.

  • In spite of the stylistic pomposity, not helped I am certain be the translation, this wonderful work contributed greatly to my understanding and appreciation of these three giants of European Romanticism. A shame that the original German remains so highly priced, even on Amazon.

  • a must read

  • Excellent

  • Excellent.

  • Excellent!

  • I have read quite a few of Stefan Zweig books, but his study of Holderlin, Kleist, and Nietzsche in The Struggle with the Daemon ("Daimon" in the older 1930s editions) is the most insightful of all.

    After Romanticism the genre of confessional autobiography cropped up. Unfortunately, by pretending to approach the subject of the human psyche on the basis of abstract principles, psychoanalysis, academic psychology and psychiatry usurped the study of the inner self and approached the human soul from the impossible viewpoint of objectivism. This category error permeates the academia (to understand concrete people it's necessary a subjective or an empathetic history of these people). It is a scandal that we still lack what in The Divided Self Laing called a "science of the persons".

    Holderlin and Nietzsche became mad; Kleist committed suicide. Zweig's Struggle with the Daemon is a good starting point to understand the tormented souls. According to Walter Kaufmann, Zweig's chapter on Nietzsche is still unsurpassed. I would agree with him to a certain point. Zweig committed suicide in 1942, forty-six years before Alice Miller finally deciphered with The Untouched Key: Tracing Childhood Trauma in Creativity and Destructiveness why did Nietzsche lost his mind. However, unlike Miller's slim chapter on Nietzsche, Zweig's lyrics in his triple biography are a literary treat.

    This is a fundamental book that must be in all personal libraries of those concerned with intuitive psychology. I am glad that after so many decades an English translation is now again in print.