mostraligabue
» » So Many Books

ePub So Many Books download

by Gabriel Zaid

ePub So Many Books download
Author:
Gabriel Zaid
ISBN13:
978-0954221782
ISBN:
0954221788
Language:
Publisher:
Sort of Books; Main edition (October 1, 2004)
Category:
Subcategory:
History & Criticism
ePub file:
1951 kb
Fb2 file:
1177 kb
Other formats:
txt mbr lit lrf
Rating:
4.6
Votes:
565

Gabriel Zaid’s most popular book is So Many Books: Reading and Publishing in an Age of Abundance.

Gabriel Zaid’s most popular book is So Many Books: Reading and Publishing in an Age of Abundance. Books by Gabriel Zaid. Showing 30 distinct works. So Many Books: Reading and Publishing in an Age of Abundance by. Gabriel Zaid, Natasha Wimmer (translator).

It is not pious, it is wise; and its wisdom is delivered with extraordinary lucidity and charm. This is how Montaigne would have written about the dizzy and increasingly dolorous age of the Internet. May So Many Books fall into so many hands. Leon Wieseltier Reading liberates the reader and transports him from his book to a reading of himself and all of life. It leads him to participate in conversations.

Join the conversation! In So Many Books, Gabriel Zaid offers his observations on the literary condition: a highly original analysis of the predicament that readers, authors, publishers, booksellers, librarians, and teachers find themselves in today-when there are simply more books than any of us can contemplate. With cascades of books pouring down on him from every direction, how can the reader keep his head above water?

So Many Books" is a marvelously thoughtful, even a challenging continuation.

So Many Books" is a marvelously thoughtful, even a challenging continuation.

So Many Books is not so much a book as a conversation: about books, about reading, about the mad business of how a book is born every 30 seconds. It is a book of proposals and arguments and debate about books, from the age of Socrates to our own. Join the conversation.

Los demasiados libros (So Many Books) (1996); English translation 2003 (Paul Dry Books, Philadelphia).

This biography of a living person needs additional citations for verification. Please help by adding reliable sources. Contentious material about living persons that is unsourced or poorly sourced must be removed immediately, especially if potentially libelous or harmful. Los demasiados libros (So Many Books) (1996); English translation 2003 (Paul Dry Books, Philadelphia). El progreso improductivo (The Improductive Progress) (1979); La feria del progreso (The Progress Fair) (1982); La economía presidencial (The Presidential Economy) (1987)

Gabriel Zaid's "So Many Books" is a stimulating andprovocative book for anyone interested in bookpublishing.

Gabriel Zaid's "So Many Books" is a stimulating andprovocative book for anyone interested in bookpublishing. His brief, inexpensive book can be read ina single sitting, yet its ideas will, I suspect,percolate for a long time afterwards. Books need to address small and specific readerships,and computer digitization and internet ogies are fostering that. Books, Zaidargues following Socrates, are a means to somethinggreater: private and public conversation enlivening andsustaining civilization and culture.

To the unrepentant reader - An embarrassment of books - Complaining about Babel - Books and conversation - Culture and commerce - Some questions about the circulation of books - The technological obsolescence of the book - The cost of reading.

To the unrepentant reader - An embarrassment of books - Complaining about Babel - Books and conversation - Culture and commerce - Some questions about the circulation of books - The technological obsolescence of the book - The cost of reading - The supply and demand of poetry - A hair shirt for masochistic.

Gabriel Zaid’s non-fiction book ‘So Many Books’ isn’t initially what you might think it would be. I was expecting from the cover and from the title that this would be a book all about the books that he loves and with over ten thousand books in his home (which he delightfully calls ‘a. .

So Many Books is not so much a book as a conversation: about books, about reading, about the mad business of how a book is born every 30 seconds. It is a book of proposals and arguments and debate about books, from the age of Socrates to our own. Join the conversation.
  • The Great Conversation began centuries ago when Socrates walked and talked with his students. He saw no need to put his efforts on a scroll. After all, the conversation was a communication of ideas. However, Plato disagreed and gave us those talks in perpetuity. Today, when we discuss great subjects, such as the contents of provocative books, we continue this Great Conversation. "So Many Books" is a marvelously thoughtful, even a challenging continuation.

    The cover illustration depicts the TBR (to-be-read) list of a typical Amazonian reviewer. Yes? Zaid includes both subjects: that unread stack and Amazon and the role it plays in matching reader with book. Think. When you go into a bookshop--or even in Amazon's cyberspace--aren't you looking for the perfect book? After Zaid discusses microcosmic you and the perfect book you seek in your constellation of books, he expands and broadens his subject exponentially until macrocosmic proportions: Amazon.

    According to Zaid, eight out of ten Americans think there's a book inside waiting to meet the paper (or cyberspace). He uses mind-bending figures to make one of his major points: There are far too many books for any one person ever to read--ever! When you consider ALL the books ever written or published and how very few ever find their readers--some never being read at all!--then the question is: Why write? Do you know that eight out of ten Americans think they have a book waiting to be put on paper. Yes, I just repeated myself--to emphasize Zaid's point that there are "so many books."

    On a grander scale, reading books is part of that conversation. Finding the right books is the biggest problem. An author, Zaid says, sees his work "as the centre of a whole," with each author holding that belief. How then can a reader join the conversation when it seems so scattered? By accumulating "a minimum of 'flight hours' in common." His ultimate point is this: "Learning to read is the integration of units of ever-more complex meaning." I had to chuckle. That sentence reminded me of an Amazonian reviewer who recently made a declaration that he would no longer read a book unless it is worthy of being re-read. Hence, his TBR stack and actually Read-Books promote this development of "ever-more complex meaning."

    There are so many gems of sentences, even whole paragraphs that make THIS book a must-read one. Since the new school year began almost six weeks ago, I go to bed exhausted and can read just a few pages before konking out. I chuckled over this sentence: "Is anything more certain to make a book completely unintelligible than reading it slowly enough?" His point is that a reader must "grasp a book all at once, in its entirety." After developing his point, he concludes: "Reading is useless: it is a vice, pure pleasure." (Caught me unawares--reading so slowly, you know--until I grasped his whole point. Ha!)

    This review touches on just a bit of the riches inside "So Many Books." However, it is the constellation of reader and books that forms the foundation. Zaid discusses Amazon's services for readers, noting that books cannot stay on shelves because of the clamor of new ones to replace them. That's where the independent seller, as found on Amazon, serves the reader. Personal case in point: I frequently buy books for my school library and so, sell discarded books on Amazon. One such book--this is a true story!--was an old travel guide of Washington, D.C. Even though the book--to me--has historical value, I thought to put it for sale just to see. Yes, the man who wrote a series of travel guides for schools back in the '50's and '60's had a son who apparently is collecting his father's books. That I could be part of this son's constellation was a thrill beyond compare.

    The intermediary--the bookseller of any description (and the reviewer)--makes "the difference between daunting chaos and a diversity that encourages dialogue. Culture is conversation, and the role of the intermediary is to shape that conversation and give new meaning to readers' lives simply by helping them find the books they need to read" (133).

    This reviewer hopes also to be an intermediary between a future reader of "So Many Books" and the chaos of books lost "out there."

  • For those like me with an expanding "to be read" pile it is interesting to find I am not alone in my affliction. Love books, love reading. Though trite and rambling and repetitive in places (despite being quite short) the topics of reading, writing and publishing are explored with some fascinating conclusions. Serious book nut? Give it a look.

  • I disagreed with quite a lot of what the author had to say- I feel like much of what he said about books is easily refutable and aside from the point. But this is not the reason that I rated this book a two. Zaid has over-written this book to where, even as an English Major, at points I found it difficult to read. The author comments that books being a good medium for information because you can capture their meaning in one short stint of reading (this reminded me of Edgar Allen Poe who suggested this to be the virtue of the short story); so I found it a bit ironic that I had to reread passage after passage to understand what he was ultimately trying to say. In the end I was too concerned with navigating his wordy prose to get much from his writing. It was too much effort spent on a work that did me little tangible good.

  • This book was even worse than paper dreams. The author rambles on and is sarcastic. If you are trying to learn editing, do not pick up this book! It goes nowhere in its own thesis and is trite.

  • Though already slightly outdated, I enjoyed this book's persuasive and argumentative standpoint about the publishing industry. It was a quick read that was an easy review of what I've learned thus far about my field.

  • I ordered this book because of my interest in contemporary reading and publishing, its short length, and the very positive reviews. I am surprised to be only the second to offer a negative review. I did not find the content well thought out. In each chapter the author lays his hand on a very general idea and surrounds it with reasonable, yet superfluous literary references and feel-good literary language. I didn't believe that the majority of the content of each chapter could hold much weight for a reader well read in the classics. My reaction was: yes, I've been there; so what? His arguments aren't so much wrong as too vague to be worth considering. If I wanted to disagree with him I would find the counterargument equally boring.

    I find this book most appropriate for someone who has read only a little literature and is still in love with the idea of it. If you don't have an opinion about literature on the whole, but rather only about particular books and schools of thought, you'll find yourself most often thinking, "What school is Zaid really promoting here," because it's hard to believe he wishes to promote all reading. The line which most made me feel this way was "But somewhere today a student read The Apology for the first time and felt free." Well, this short changes Nietzsche. But I suppose Zarathustra will make him feel free, as well (according to Zaid). Great.

    That said, there are a few nuggets in the chapters that are thought provoking, but these could easily stand alone in an essay, and are not really worth the insult of skimming required to find them.

    The first counterargument I imagine to what I have said here is that Zaid doesn't intend to make strong arguments or observations about reading and publishing in this age of abundance. Yes, that much is clear.

  • If you are the kind of person who clicks on a link to see "So Many Books" you are almost certainly the kind of person who will love this book. It's short, well-translated, and ultimately pretty mind-blowing. It's also very relevant to this broader cultural moment; I think it speaks as much to the internet & social media as it does to books and publishing.