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by Amanda Quick

ePub Surrender: A Novel download
Author:
Amanda Quick
ISBN13:
978-0553285949
ISBN:
0553285947
Language:
Publisher:
Bantam; 1st Printing edition (September 1, 1990)
Category:
Subcategory:
History & Criticism
ePub file:
1830 kb
Fb2 file:
1647 kb
Other formats:
doc docx azw mobi
Rating:
4.9
Votes:
328

FREE shipping on qualifying offers. From the dazzling ballrooms of glittering London society to magnificent, cursed estate in the distant wilds of Yorkshire.

FREE shipping on qualifying offers.

i have always liked Amanda Quick's books because they are funny and the heroine endures her problems gracefully but this one was weird because the hero heroine relationship is hung up thru . This item: Surrender: A Novel. Customers who viewed this item also viewed.

i have always liked Amanda Quick's books because they are funny and the heroine endures her problems gracefully but this one was weird because the hero heroine relationship is hung up thru practically the whole story. Obviously it does come together in the end but it took a long time and it was annoying to "hear" these people arguing all the time.

Amanda Quick, a pseudonym for Jayne Ann Krentz, is a bestselling, award-winning author of contemporary and historical .

Amanda Quick, a pseudonym for Jayne Ann Krentz, is a bestselling, award-winning author of contemporary and historical romances. There are over twenty-five million copies of her books in print, including Seduction, Surrender, Scandal, Rendezvous, Ravished, Reckless, Dangerous, Deception, Desire, Mistress, Mystique, Mischief, Affair, With This Ring, and I Thee Wed. She makes her home in the Pacific Northwest with her husband, Frank.

Bantam Books by Amanda Quick. Ask your bookseller for. the books you have missed. Other Books by this Author. Chapter 1. Chapter 2. Chapter 3. Chapter 4.

While Surrender includes all of the necessary components for a successful Amanda Quick novel, something is missing. Victoria is intelligent, independent and witty, but she is also immature, self-absorbed and petulant. Lucas is strong, courageous and sexy, but his initial desire to marry for money and his self-righteous and high-handed tactics are less than appealing. Despite these character flaws, Victoria and Lucas have excellent chemistry and their battle of wills is engaging.

Электронная книга "Surrender: A Novel", Amanda Quick. Amanda Quick22 сентября 2010 г. Продавец: Bantam. Эту книгу можно прочитать в Google Play Книгах на компьютере, а также на устройствах Android и iOS. Выделяйте текст, добавляйте закладки и делайте заметки, скачав книгу "Surrender: A Novel" для чтения в офлайн-режиме.

Surrender by Amanda Quick - book cover, description, publication history. Used availability for Amanda Quick's Surrender. August 1995 : UK Hardback.

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Unconditional Surrender is a 1961 novel by the British novelist Evelyn Waugh. The novel has also been published under the title The End of the Battle. Along with the other two novels in the series, it was adapted into a 2001 TV film with Daniel Craig. Unconditional Surrender is the third novel in Waugh's Sword of Honour series, the author's examination of the Second World War. The novels loosely parallel Waugh's wartime experiences.

Surrender is a novel written by the award-winning Australian novelist, Sonya Hartnett. It was first published in 2005 in Australia by Walker Books. It is narrated by twenty-year-old Gabriel, who is dying, and twenty-year-old Finnigan, a homeless boy who is Gabriel's only friend. Seven-year-old Anwell lives in a prestigious but coldly distant family with a mother who is always sick and a father who punishes him with physical abuse. Anwell has no friends and is on a very tight leash

From the dazzling ballrooms of glittering London society to magnificent, cursed estate in the distant wilds of Yorkshire, comes the deliciously wicked story of a thoroughly unconventional courtship—and a thrilling midnight rendezvous that could only lead to love... At four and twenty Victoria Huntington thought herself quite adept at fending off fortune hunters... until she came under siege from Lucas Colebrook, the darkly disturbing new Earl of Stonevale. Amidst the brightly plumed birds of the town, Lucas was a hawk. And when he held out the lure of moonlit rides and wild, reckless midnight escapades, Victoria found herself powerless to resist. But becoming Stonevale's companion in adventure was far more dangerous undertaking than Victoria could ever imagine. For the attractive Earl would use her every weakness to woo her, to win her, and ultimately to wed her. And soon the amber-eyed lady would find herself ensconced in a crumbling mansion deep in the English countryside... where the real reason for her hasty marriage becomes all too apparent...and where the ghosts of her dark-stained past are waiting to rise up in a terrifying plot that will threaten her life, her honor, and the only man she could ever love.
  • This was assigned reading for a women's club discussion about the Romance genre, or else I never would have chosen to look at it. I much prefer Historical Fiction, and what I appreciate about that is good research. All my notes on this book (and they are legion) are nit-picky complaints about misplaced modern day jargon and attitudes. I guess lovers of this genre don't mind historical inaccuracies because they are in it for the story (to quote another romance novelist, Maya Rodale): "We read for relatable characters. We read for scorching, hot passion (that would never have been spoken of in the polite society we write about, let alone written down). We read for true love blossoming and over coming obstacles. We read for happily-ever-after." Well, none of that fits into my own set of criteria; I feel sorry for giving this book only 1 star, when it's the genre I don't like. Sorry Amanda Quick!

    Although for the author I do have questions: Why would an ex-fiancee go to such lengths to get Lucas married? Why does Victoria wear the same color every single day? Why give a character one cardinal rule and then have him break it? Why would Victoria be attracted to a man with a temper who drinks port by the bottle considering how traumatized she was by her alcoholic, raging step-father? How contrived is it that both main characters happen to suffer from very specific nightly recurring dreams? Must the bad guys be so two-dimensional and cartoonish as they expound upon the details of their evil plan?

  • I purchased this book because I needed a romance novel "fix" while awaiting Lisa Kleypas' next book. I'd never read any of the author's previous books, and was pleasantly surprised with this one.

    Victoria Huntington is an admirable character, who unlike her other well-bred contemporaries, wants to experience those aspects of life which are denied to her by society's rules ... and avoid all those fortune hunters constantly on her heels. Lucas Colebrook, the new Earl of Stonevale, needs to marry an heiress, and with the assistance of a former love, decides that Victoria is the woman for him. He soon discovers that she is not your "typical" heiress and that wooing and winning her is going to require his mounting a necessary, and hopefully victorious (pardon the pun) strategy/campaign. Being a former military man, he does just that. There is danger and humor throughout the book which made it that much more enjoyable for this reader. I recommend it, and may now have to check out other Amanda Quick novels.

  • Of all Amanda Quick's books, this one is one of her best and has found it's way to my reread list several times. The plot is simple: poor earl seeks heiress bride vs. adventurous spinster seeks dangerous escapades as a diversion from deep dark secret.

    But where other historical romances would play up Lucas' fortune hunting as an avenue to Alpha maledom, Lucas never quite gets beyond paternalistic. He chooses the adventurous heiress because she intrigues him (passing up the simpleminded heiress who'd easily give him money for title). He courts the adventurous heiress by taking her out on one scandalous and dangerous midnight escapade after another because that's the only way she'd let him near her. (And surprisingly for Quick) he's even a tender and solicitous lover to her when she decrees they have an affair rather than accept his marriage offer. (Explcit meaning of that is that the consummation scene is mutually satisfying for hero & heroine. Amanda Quick tends to write her love scene sequences in the same pattern of first encounter promising foreplay, unsatisfying consummation, third encounter the hero finally gets it right. "Surrender" and "Dangerous" are the two novels that don't use that cliche sequence.)

    Some reviewers have called Lucas a tyrant for later refusing Vicky's one-off reckless business investment, but he merely points out the foolishness of her plan. It makes more sense for her to invest her money in his land, helping rebuild the town for all the people she can truly help rather than blow it on some frivolous thing. (Something she herself notes a few chapters earlier when she intentionally shops in the town and plans rebuilding the roads simply because the people need that monetary help.) Indeed this whole segment seems shoehorned into the story solely to create a conflict of misunderstanding when one does not really exist.

    And as for his supposedly opposing her midnight jaunts once they're married, HE'S the one who invites her on those midnight rides in the country. Getting upset because she may be in danger at points is precisely what he did in their courtship... because he feels protective of her.

    If I fault this book for anything it is the consistent idiocy of the heroine. She's so determined to see fault in the hero, she makes up things he's done wrong. In the end, the reader is left feeling she was damn lucky he didn't give up on her.

  • I am a great fan of Jayne Ann Krentz books and enjoyed this one immensely and would recommend it for anyone as a wondeful read - she never disappoints.

  • I certainly liked the beginning, and it definitely was different than Quick's usual style. It got to be a bit difficult toward the middle, because she writes long, drawn-out sentences of dialogue, that are sarcastic, but it's a little too much. It's too formal and annoying.

    The story itself held my attention, but for some reason she wrote over all the following intimate scenes between them after their first time together. It was implied what they were going to do, or she'd end a section with something like "...and he took his wife upstairs." But the scenes are never written, which was unsatisfying.

  • An enjoyable and thoughtfully plotted story that moves along at a good pace. One of Amanda's more engaging efforts and we'll worth reading.

  • i have always liked Amanda Quick's books because they are funny and the heroine endures her problems gracefully but this one was weird because the hero heroine relationship is hung up thru practically the whole story. Obviously it does come together in the end but it took a long time and it was annoying to "hear" these people arguing all the time.

  • Enjoy Amanda Quick stories. Surrender was very good...