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ePub A Vindication of the Rights of Men / A Vindication of the Rights of Woman / An Historical and Moral View of the French Revolution download

by Janet Todd,Mary Wollstonecraft

ePub A Vindication of the Rights of Men / A Vindication of the Rights of Woman / An Historical and Moral View of the French Revolution download
Author:
Janet Todd,Mary Wollstonecraft
ISBN13:
978-0192836526
ISBN:
0192836528
Language:
Publisher:
Oxford University Press (September 23, 2004)
Category:
Subcategory:
History & Criticism
ePub file:
1268 kb
Fb2 file:
1572 kb
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Rating:
4.8
Votes:
672

A Vindication of the Rights of Woman: with Strictures on Political and Moral Subjects (1792), written by the 18th-century British proto-feminist Mary Wollstonecraft, is one of the earliest works of feminist philosophy. In it, Wollstonecraft responds.

A Vindication of the Rights of Woman: with Strictures on Political and Moral Subjects (1792), written by the 18th-century British proto-feminist Mary Wollstonecraft, is one of the earliest works of feminist philosophy. In it, Wollstonecraft responds to those educational and political theorists of the 18th century who did not believe women should receive a rational education.

A Vindication of the Rights of Men, in a Letter to the Right Honourable Edmund Burke; Occasioned by His Reflections on the Revolution in France (1790) is a political pamphlet, written by the 18th-century British liberal feminist Mary Wollstonecraft,.

A Vindication of the Rights of Men, in a Letter to the Right Honourable Edmund Burke; Occasioned by His Reflections on the Revolution in France (1790) is a political pamphlet, written by the 18th-century British liberal feminist Mary Wollstonecraft, which attacks aristocracy and advocates republicanism.

Janet Todd's introduction illuminates the progress of Wollstonecraft's thought, showing that a reading of all three works allows her to emerge as a more substantial political writer than a study of The Rights of Woman alone can reveal. Online Stores ▾. Audible Barnes & Noble Walmart eBooks Apple Books Google Play Abebooks Book Depository Alibris Indigo Better World Books IndieBound. Paperback, Oxford World’s Classics, 464 pages.

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Chapter 9: The pernicious effects of the unnatural distinctions established in. .sense: MW speaks of ‘a man of sense’ she means ‘a fairly intelligent man’ or, in her terms, ‘a man with a fairly enlarged understanding’.

Chapter 9: The pernicious effects of the unnatural distinctions established in society. Chapter 10: Parental Affection. Chapter 11: Duty to Parents. Chapter 12: National education. sensibility: Capacity for rened emotion, readiness to feel compassion for suffering, or the quality of being strongly affected by emotional inuences. MW uses the adjective ‘sensible’-e. on page 63-in pretty much our sense of it.

It traces her passionate and indignant response to the excitement of the early days of the French Revolution and then her uneasiness at its later bloody phase. To purchase, visit your preferred ebook provider. Request Inspection Copy.

Chapter 1. the rights and involved duties of mankind considered

Chapter 1. the rights and involved duties of mankind considered. Chapter 2. the prevailing opinion of a sexual character discussed. Chapter 3. the same subject continued. One cause of this barren blooming I attribute to a false system of education, gathered from the books written on this subject by men, who, considering females rather as women than human creatures, have been more anxious to make them alluring mistresses than rational wives; and the understanding of the sex has been so bubbled by this specious homage, that the civilized women.

The facing page contains an inscription by woman suffragist Susan B. Anthony. Library of Congress Rare Book and Special Collections Division Washington, . 20540 USA. Learn about this topic in these articles: discussed in biography. In Mary Wollstonecraft. woman’s place in society is A Vindication of the Rights of Woman (1792), which calls for women and men to be educated equally.

Mary Wollstonecraft’s A Vindication of the Rights of Woman was a ground-breaking work of literature which still resonates in feminism and human rights movements of today. Wollstonecraft (1759-1797) wrote the book in part as a reaction to Edmund Burke’s Reflections on the French Revolution, published in late 1790.

This volume brings together the major political writings of Mary Wollstonecraft in the order in which they appeared in the revolutionary 1790s. It traces her passionate and indignant response to the excitement of the early days of the French Revolution and then her uneasiness at its later bloody phase. It reveals her developing understanding of women's involvement in the political and social life of the nation and her growing awareness of the relationship between politics and economics and between political institutions and the individual. In personal terms, the works show her struggling with a belief in the perfectibility of human nature through rational education, a doctrine that became weaker under the onslaught of her own miserable experience and the revolutionary massacres. Janet Todd's introduction illuminates the progress of Wollstonecraft's thought, showing that a reading of all three works allows her to emerge as a more substantial political writer than a study of The Rights of Woman alone can reveal.
  • Its nice not to have to trudge through a read. My norm seems to be expletive-laced grumbling while the last page can't come soon enough. Wollstonecraft has been a breath of fresh air. I have to admit that I went into it with bias. I've read so many male philosophers, probably because women at the time weren't taken seriously, as what happened with Wollstonecraft and the ridicule she received. I was nervous that it was going to be trite and overly emotional. It was an extraordinary blend of reason and sentiment.

    Her style is poetic. At times, it feels it almost has a sing-song way about it. Her ability reminds me of Jane Austen and makes it very hard to put the book down. I wonder how much Austen lifted from Wollstonecraft considering there was a section on Sense and Sensibility and Pride and Prejudice.

    Her philosophy is intriguing. Wollstonecraft was quite ahead of her time. She felt that women were trapped in an eternal childhood in the way they were treated by their other halves. This left them unable to be good wives much less good mothers. She makes the argument that not only can women reason, but they can be employed in any field. She envisions a time where boys and girls, rich or poor, can be educated together.

    As an aside, I don't think the public school system has worked out so well. I attended a joke of a school. That is why I am grateful to have the opportunity to homeschool. Even if you disagree with her assessment that children should be publicly educated, her main point is that boys and girls alike can be educated the same. She actually advocated for a private/public school mix. I'm not sure that our modern day system would meet her vision at all.

    The crème de la crème? Pages upon pages of attacks on Rousseau. I think I've formed a personal vendetta against Rousseau so when she blasts his inane philosophy for nearly 1/3 of the book, it could only bring a sense of sweet justice. If you're no fan of Rousseau, its worth the read just for that. Ya know, the guy who created Civil Religion. The guy who wrote books about how children should be educated then abandoned all 5 of his newborn children to a foundling hospital. The guy who said women were created for his pleasure. Yeah, its a pretty epic takedown. Enjoy.

  • It's dreadful to read at times because it kind of makes you want to travel back in time and slap some sense into men and how dreadful the patriarchal system was. BUT... It's a great book. I bought it for my thesis on the patriarchal system in Regency England and this book, while showing Mary Wollstonecraft's very clear point of view on her society, provides a lot of information and detail that shows what life was like at that time (or a few years before, but it's basically the same era). A must if you're into history, women's rights or the likes.
    If you're thinking about getting it for a paper or thesis or something, go for it.

  • This book was mentioned in Founding Mothers, by Cokie Roberts, as an essential piece of writing from the mid 1700s. So I tried to read it. It is a long and rambling diatribe against the fact that women of the time, or at least the upper class ones, were valued not for themselves, their ideas or their common sense, but as decorative and submissive male appendages, for ever prevented from attaining their true potential (and values more for youth and beauty than more lasting assets). Oddly, the impression from reading "Founding Mothers" mothers, about the women behind the men who broke from England to form the United States, was of an intrepid and capable bunch of women, quite unlike the most of the 'ladies/women' portrayed in this famous early-feminist lecture.

  • A tedious read bogged down with the florid prose of its time. It is feminist, so it is indulgently victim oriented. She sees no positives in women being more loved, only negatives in women being less respected. She holds the masculine solely responsible and makes her plea for men alone to "fix" the problem. Blind to Woman's efficacy, she doesn't see the degree to which women's own choices create women's predicaments.

    But she gets one thing right that subsequent feminism gets wrong. She may not grasp how female power makes Woman equal partner in the human system, equally responsible for outcomes, but she gets it that female power is the root cause of women's issues. She gets it that women in general can best be compared with elite royalty in the way that they are both empowered to go passive. Little is demanded of them. They are both spoiled. In my own words, they are both the "victims of a trust fund." She gets that it's women's *innate* value, power and privilege that inhibits women's ambition.

    Here you get the standard false premise---men have the power; women are the victims---that plagues all femininism. But in the mix Wollstonecraft expresses many truths about female power and privilege that the coming ideological dictatorship will render forbidden. So, if you want to see this flicker of female accountability before it was snuffed out, read this book.

  • This book is simply amazing for the author's thinking on women's rights (and responsibilities). I can't believe that such a forward thinking woman was writing in the 1700s. Her clear view of women's rightful position in society, as opposed to their actual position, is made evident at every turn. Her ideas on education - for girls and boys - must have seemed bizarre for her time, but her arguments in favour of her theories are sound and endorsed by modern education philosophies. My only criticism is that she is verbose and repetitious and some of her sentences are over a page long! Well punctuated and quite correct as to grammar, they seem to go on and on. I loved this book and have written down many quotes to keep. One in particular, where she describes foolish women foregoing the joys and duties of motherhood and marriage as chasing the ephemeral "pleasures that sit lightly on the wing of time". What a delightful turn of phrase!