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ePub J. M. Barrie and the Lost Boys: The Real Story Behind Peter Pan download

by Andrew Birkin

ePub J. M. Barrie and the Lost Boys: The Real Story Behind Peter Pan download
Author:
Andrew Birkin
ISBN13:
978-0300098228
ISBN:
0300098227
Language:
Publisher:
Yale University Press; New Ed edition (July 11, 2003)
Category:
Subcategory:
History & Criticism
ePub file:
1394 kb
Fb2 file:
1979 kb
Other formats:
mobi azw lrf lit
Rating:
4.9
Votes:
985

Beautifully designed, the book reproduces letters and diary entries from Barrie and his circle, as well as dozens of photographs .

Beautifully designed, the book reproduces letters and diary entries from Barrie and his circle, as well as dozens of photographs. -Caryn James, New York Times. His most acute biographer, Andrew Birkin, whose, J. M. Barrie and the Lost Boys, has been granted a timely reissue. digs up some astounding entries from Barrie’s private notebooks. Some are composed in the third person, as jottings toward a possible novel. -Anthony Lane, New Yorker. A psychological thriller. one of the year’s most complex and absorbing biographies. -Gerald Clarke, Time.

M. Barrie, Victorian novelist, playwright, and author of Peter Pan or The Boy Who Wouldn’t Grow Up, led a life almost as magical and interesting as as his famous creation. Childless in his marriage, Barrie grew close to the five young boys of the Llewelyn Davies family, ultimately becoming their guardian and devoted surrogate father when they were orphaned. Andrew Birkin draws extensively on a vast range of material by and about Barrie, including notebooks, memoirs, and hours of recorded interviews with the family and their circle, to describe Barrie’s life and the wonderful world he created for the boys.

Andrew Birkin draws extensively on a vast range of material by and about Barrie, including notebooks, memoirs, and . J. Barrie, Victorian novelist, playwright, and author of Peter Pan or The Boy Who Wouldn't Grow Up, led a life almost as magical and interesting as as his famous creation.

Andrew Birkin draws extensively on a vast range of material by and about Barrie, including notebooks, memoirs, and hours of recorded interviews with the family and their circle, to describe Barrie's life and the wonderful world he created for the boys.

A fascinating story, beautifully constructed and told with grace, great .

A fascinating story, beautifully constructed and told with grace, great sympathy and skill. By a rare dramatic gift, Mr Birkin makes the past live around the characters. The numerous illustrations. The book that Mr Birkin has written is as lucid and gripping as his award-winning television trilogy, The Lost Boys. – John Leonard, New York Times. Having created one of television's masterpieces, The Lost Boys, Andrew Birkin follows it up, not with the now customary book of the programme, but with its documentation set out in another form but with an equally compelling artistry.

Barrie, novelist, playwright, and author of "Peter Pan or The Boy Who Wouldn't Grow Up", led a life almost as magical and interesting as his famous creation. digs up some astounding entries from Barrie's private notebooks. one of the year's most complex and absorbing biographies.

J. Andrew Birkin draws extensively on a vast range of material by and about Barrie, including notebooks, memoirs, and hours of recorded interviews with the family and their circle, to describe Barrie's life and the.

The Lost Boys is a 1978 docudrama mini-series produced by the BBC, written by Andrew Birkin, and directed by Rodney Bennett. It is about the relationship between Peter Pan creator J. Barrie and the Llewelyn Davies boys

The Lost Boys is a 1978 docudrama mini-series produced by the BBC, written by Andrew Birkin, and directed by Rodney Bennett. Barrie and the Llewelyn Davies boys. Novelist and playwright James Barrie (Ian Holm) meets the two oldest Davies boys, George and Jack, during outings with their nurse Mary Hodgson (Anna Cropper) in Kensington Gardens.

Moving, charming, a revelation (Los Angeles Times). Barrie, Victorian novelist, playwright, and author of Peter Pan,or The Boy Who Wouldn’t Grow Up, led a life almost as interesting as his famous creation. Andrew Birkin draws extensively on a vast range of material by and about Barrie, including notebooks, memoirs, and hours of recorded interviews with the family and their circle, to describe Barrie’s life, the tragedies that shaped him, and the wonderful world of imagination he created for the boys.

Home J. Barrie Peter Pa. Feeling that Peter was on his way back, the Neverland had again wokeinto life. We ought to use the pluperfect and say wakened, but woke isbetter and was always used by Peter. Barrie Peter Pan. Home. In his absence things are usually quiet on the island. The fairies takean hour longer in the morning, the beasts attend to their young, theredskins feed heavily for six days and nights, and when pirates andlost boys meet they merely bite their thumbs at each other

J. M. Barrie, Victorian novelist, playwright, and author of Peter Pan or The Boy Who Wouldn’t Grow Up, led a life almost as magical and interesting as as his famous creation. Childless in his marriage, Barrie grew close to the five young boys of the Llewelyn Davies family, ultimately becoming their guardian and devoted surrogate father when they were orphaned. Andrew Birkin draws extensively on a vast range of material by and about Barrie, including notebooks, memoirs, and hours of recorded interviews with the family and their circle, to describe Barrie’s life and the wonderful world he created for the boys.Originally published in 1979, this enchanting and richly illustrated account is reissued with a new preface to mark the release of Neverland, the film of Barrie’s life, and the upcoming centenary of Peter Pan.“A psychological thriller . . . one of the year’s most complex and absorbing biographies.”—Gerald Clarke, Time“A terrible and fascinating story.”—Eve Auchincloss, Washington Post
  • I have been fascinated by the back story of Peter Pan since I was a young boy. The idea of a sassy little guy leading children to a world of adventure appealed to my inquisitive and naive mind. I wanted to be there. As I became more mature I realized that those adventures had connotations that were both sinister and thought provoking. What is the truth behind J. M. Barrie, author of “Peter Pan,” and his wildly imaginative story?

    Barrie has long been under critical scrutiny for his strange lifestyle. To add fuel to the debate, he even cautioned others against digging into his life: “May God blast anyone who writes a biography about me.” Despite the curse, dozens of accounts of his curious interest in young boys and pretty women have been published. Most have attempted to put an unnatural spin on his behavior leading to charges of stalking, voyeurism, and pedophilia. Andrew Birkin, in his extensive biography, J.M. BARRIE AND THE LOST BOYS, presents far-reaching and well documented information about Barrie’s relationship with the five young sons of the Llewelyn Davies family, as well as the mother, Sylvia, and, in less flattering fashion, with the father, Arthur. First published in 1979, Birkin has reissued several editions through the years, the latest being in 2004, bringing to light more details and updating others.

    The work is masterfully constructed using material from notebooks, memoirs, correspondence, and interviews and includes a multitude of photographs, some taken by Barrie. Pictures of bare bottomed boys romping on the beach are some of the damning evidence against his behavioral patterns. The result is an exhaustive, almost tedious study of how a stunted and strange little man shoehorned himself into a family of beautiful people, usurping their trust to become a trusted family member with unlimited access to five lovely boys and a mother’s devotion. The youngsters became the characters who, along with their fictitious sister Wendy, followed Peter Pan to Never Never Land, a world of adventure that has fascinated readers for more than century.

    Birkin has presented Barrie as a non-threatening acquaintance who truly loved each member of the family, possibly in substitution for his miserable childhood with an obsessive mother who could never overcome the grief of losing her favorite son when Barrie was only six years old. The Llewelyn Davies boys were beautiful and talented and accepted Barrie as a surrogate father, never shying away from his obsessive love or returning it. Some of his letters to the boys could be interpreted as carrying messages of pedophilia and are additional evidence of illicit behavior on the part of Barrie. But Birkin interprets them as one child addressing another in innocence; the photos are seen as normal to families of that era. He maintains Barrie was incapable of sexual intentions, incapable of any type of sexual behavior, and was simply a child who never grew up. None of the children in their adult years aver implicated Barrie in nefarious activity.

    A beautifully written op-ed by Alexandra Gill in the April 20, 2004 issue of Toronto’s newspaper “The Globe and Mail” compares Barrie and Michael Jackson, both of whom had a fantasy land where they could be little boys again, enjoying the company of children, and even sleeping with them in innocent pleasure. It is in this context that I tend to think of Barrie as not so much a lecherous misfit as a highly ingenious person with a childish outlook There is a lot of evidence to the contrary and I’m still in the search mode. I love the intrigue of trying to sort it out.

    Schuyler T Wallace
    Author of TIN LIZARD TALES

  • J.M. Barrie was a popular UK novelist and playwright in the late 19th century, but his works are largely forgotten today except for his play and subsequent book about the adventures of Peter Pan, a boy who could fly and never grew up. Peter Pan was based on Barrie's real-life difficulties with transitioning to adulthood. Despite his worldly success, Barrie was reportedly unable to have a passionate adult relationship with anyone, man or woman (including his own long-suffering wife as well as many women with whom he flirted). He was most interested in spending time with children, often acting like a child himself and sometimes taking on a more fatherly role, but according to the children themselves, without anything untoward going on. Having no children of his own (see above inability to be passionate with women), Barrie became inordinately attached to the children of his friends and even to strange children he met on his walks in Kensington Gardens. Eventually he focused on the Llewellyn-Davies family, inserting and intruding himself into the lives of five young upperclass English boys and their charming mother Sylvia. These boys provided the inspiration and models for Peter Pan, with Sylvia as Wendy. When both Sylvia and the boys' father tragically died at young ages, Barrie contrived to essentially adopt the boys he dearly loved, only to lose several of them to WWI or other tragedies.

    Barrie was definitely an odd fellow and one can't help but compare him to the more modern example of Michael Jackson, another talented, rich celebrity who seemed to be unable to "grow up" and sought out the company of young boys. For example, the book includes passages from Barrie's book "The Little White Bird," a bestseller in its time but little known today, which describe an older man having a very young boy for a sleepover in his own bed in extremely loving and sentimental terms. If Barrie lived today, surely people would wonder if his interest in children, and particularly in the Llewellyn-Davies boys, was purely platonic, and he might even be the target of lawsuits. Yet, the Llewellyn-Davies boys who survived and provided source material for the book insist that Barrie was simply great, fun company and a true innocent, never making any passes at the boys. To a large extent, the author lets the source material, including Barrie's own notebooks, tell the story, without grafting on too much of his own analysis. My personal conclusion was that Barrie probably did not molest any of the Llewellyn-Davies boys (or other children with whom he spent time), but that as the boys matured he became passionately drawn to at least two of them, at least one of whom, Michael, was openly homosexual. It seemed like Barrie might well have eventually acted on his desires when the boys came of age - if the war and death had not tragically interfered.

    This exceedingly well-researched book is enjoyable and easy to read, and will appeal to those who enjoy Victoriana and Edwardiana in general, as well as those seeking to learn more about the creator of "Peter Pan." The author includes many photographs, drawings and reproductions of other source materials such as letters and postcards, helping the reader to better picture the characters.

    The main reason I gave this book four stars instead of five is that the book ends somewhat abruptly with the death of Michael, which Barrie took very hard because Michael, a talented young poet, was his favorite and best loved of the five boys. The death of Michael drove Barrie into such deep despair that he contemplated suicide. Yet, he did not kill himself and in fact went on to live for a number of years, wrote his last play, involved himself in various political activities, and had dealings with other children including the young Princess Margaret. Unfortunately, Barrie's life after Michael's death and his subsequent grieving is summarized in just a couple of pages. I would have liked to know more about how Barrie got over this devastating loss, and more about his daily life thereafter, especially since all the periods of his life up to that point are covered in some detail. As it is, I feel like the last chapters of the story are "missing" and I'll have to buy someone else's book on Barrie to fill in the blanks.

  • Wow. I thought Ann Thwaite's biography of A.A. Milne was quite something with regards to Milne's son and the whole Winnie the Pooh thing, but now that seems mild to me compared to the fascinating but truly terrible circumstances of J.M. Barrie and his Peter Pan books! I can't get over the fact that these two men were not only contemporaries but actually attended a couple years of grammar school together.

    This book, J.M Barrie and The Lost Boys, is very well written and the story and many dozens of photos led me blithely through all the years of this sad man's life, his many plays and books, and the five boys he confiscated to the last years, never guessing what was to happen -- incident after incident, 7 or more times over! -- since somehow I have avoided this gruesome story in all the years of my reading (about 50 years). I think I am most impressed with Peter Davies' writings for the aptly titled and unpublished "Morgue", probably the most fair, true and unrestrained pieces of writing in any book, anywhere. It is gut-wrenching!

    All these years after the fact, I am so sad for the Davies family as well as for the very troubled little man who devoured them. What a reading experience this was!