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ePub Frank Norris Revisited (Twayne's United States Authors Series) download

by Joseph R. McElrath

ePub Frank Norris Revisited (Twayne's United States Authors Series) download
Author:
Joseph R. McElrath
ISBN13:
978-0805739657
ISBN:
0805739653
Language:
Publisher:
Twayne Pub; annotated edition edition (July 1, 1992)
Category:
Subcategory:
History & Criticism
ePub file:
1992 kb
Fb2 file:
1379 kb
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Rating:
4.6
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579

book by Joseph R. McElrath J. .Frank Norris Revisited.

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Frank Norris Revisited book. Twayne's United States Authors, English Authors, and World Authors Series present concise critical introductions to great writers and their works

Frank Norris Revisited book. Twayne's United States Authors, English Authors, and World Authors. Twayne's United States Authors, English Authors, and World Authors Series present concise critical introductions to great writers and their works.

Frank Norris Revisited. New York: Twayne Publishers, p. 113.

Biographer Joseph R. McElrath writes in Frank Norris Revisited that The Pit was widely hailed by its generation’s readers to be the Great American Novel". Norris succeeded in writing a story that could entertain both popular and more sophisticated audiences. ^ Norris (1903), p. 230.

Twayne's United States Authors Series. By (author) Jr. Joseph R. Mcelrath

Twayne's United States Authors Series. Mcelrath. In his insightful exploration of this complex writer, Joseph McElrath holds a mirror up to the world Norris depicted with such immediacy, and the images we see look much like the America of today. Format Hardback 158 pages.

Frank Norris Revisited (Twayne, 1992). The Complete Works of Anne Bradstreet (Twayne, 1981), with Alan P. Robb. Frank Norris: The Critical Reception (New York: Burt Franklin, 1981), with Elizabeth Knight. Frank Norris: A Reference Guide (Hall, 1974), with Jesse S. Crisler.

Born in Chicago in 1870, Frank Norris led a life of adventure and art. He moved to San Francisco at fifteen, spent . He moved to San Francisco at fifteen, spent two years in Paris painting, returned to San Francisco to become an internationally famous author, and died at age thirty-two from a ruptured appendix

The first complete biography of this centrally important American novelist to appear in over seventy years. During his short life, he wrote an inspired series of novels about the United States coming of age, including The Octopus, The Pit, and McTeague. McElrath Jr. is the William Hudson Rogers Professor of English at Florida State University and the author of Frank Norris Revisited and Frank Norris: A Descriptive Bibliography.

Free books to read or listen online in a convenient form, a large collection, the best authors and series. Moran of the Lady Letty, originally published in 1898, was Frank Norris's first published novel. Although an avid fan of Norris, having read some of his nautical adventure stories in the collection A Deal in Wheat, I did not approach this work with very high expectations. Soon after diving in, however, I was pleasantly surprised by how well-written and entertaining it is.

Frank Norris, American novelist who was the first important naturalist writer in the United States. Norris studied painting in Paris for two years but then decided that literature was his vocation

Frank Norris, American novelist who was the first important naturalist writer in the United States. Norris studied painting in Paris for two years but then decided that literature was his vocation. He attended the University of California in 1890–94 and then spent another year at Harvard. This article was most recently revised and updated by Amy Tikkanen, Corrections Manager.

McElrath, Jr. and Gwendolyn Jones (1994). Introduction" to The Pit. New York: Penguin Books. Frank Norris: his Place in the Development of the American Novel. State University of Iowa. Bixler, Paul H. (1934). Frank Norris's Literary Reputation," American Literature, Vol. 6, No. 2, pp. 109–121.

The renown Frank Norris attained in his brief lifetime sprang from his compelling--and to many Americans startling--novels about people whose lives have escaped their control and have become grotesquely warped by the confluent forces of hereditary and environment. In the decades after his death in 1902, though, this broad appeal fossilized to some degree, and Norris's Naturalistic novels entered the domain of the literary historian, serving as benchmarks in the genre's evolution. Fortunately for this author of such masterpieces as McTeague (1899), The Octopus (1901), and The Pit (1903), a long-overdue critical interest in his writing materialized in the 1970s, since which time Norris has been regarded as not only an experimenter in many voices and types of writing, but also as a chronicler of a culture in flux.In "revisiting" Frank Norris--and appropriately so as America nears another fin de siecle and reflects on its sociocultural identity--Joseph R. McElrath, Jr., takes as a starting point Warren French's 1962 volume in this series and provides a complementary portrait of the artist. McElrath assesses the spate of relatively recent "historical reconstructions" of Norris's canon and finds a writer who, though at times transcendent in the Naturalistic vein, was pragmatic in his choice of subject matter and "not always grandly serious." It is in part the delight Norris took in parody, McElrath argues, that makes him still so readable.Norris is fittingly remembered as a Literary Naturalist, McElrath concedes, but only if this school of writing is understood as a continuum of the Humanist tradition, not a pseudoscientific aberration. McElrath contends that Norris's questioning of "Who are we?" and "Where are we going?" puts him in league with Thomas More, Erasmus, Rabelais, and Shakespeare--as well as with Emile Zola, whose novelistic trouncing of Victorian cultural values so influenced Norris's writing.McElrath concurs foremost with estimations of Norris as a touchstone of the changes in art and thought that made the 1890s such a paradoxical decade. Norris kept his finger on America's pulse, McElrath observes--from his luridly thrilling adventure-romance, Moran of the Lady Letty (1898); to Blix (1899), his partially autobiographical contribution to the period's love idylls, in which good young people triumph over adversities to know happiness; to his most widely read novel, McTeague, a frank, post-Darwinian portrait of greed, sexual arousal, brutal violence, and psychopathology among the denizens of society's underside.When Norris died at the age of 32, his contemporaries mourned the loss of, potentially, the Great American Novelist. In his insightful exploration of this complex writer, Joseph McElrath holds a mirror up to the world Norris depicted with such immediacy, and the images we see look much like the America of today.