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ePub The Custom Of The Country download

by Eadith Wharton

ePub The Custom Of The Country download
Author:
Eadith Wharton
ISBN13:
978-0684146553
ISBN:
068414655X
Language:
Publisher:
Scribner (March 1, 1976)
Category:
Subcategory:
History & Criticism
ePub file:
1421 kb
Fb2 file:
1986 kb
Other formats:
mobi txt lrf lrf
Rating:
4.2
Votes:
616

It tells the story of Undine Spragg, a Midwestern girl who attempts to ascend in New York City society.

It tells the story of Undine Spragg, a Midwestern girl who attempts to ascend in New York City society. The Spraggs, a family of midwesterners from the fictional city of Apex who have made money through somewhat shady financial dealings, arrive in New York City at the prompting of their beautiful, ambitious, but socially naive daughter, Undine.

Nor do her characters. I can't improve on my mother's description of The Custom of the Country as "Henry James meets Candace Bushnell," except to recommend it also to fans of Gossip Girl and similar treats. The special thing about this particular book of hers is its repellent anti-heroine, the wonderfully named and well-initialed society beauty Undine Spragg.

After her marriage, she lived in Newport and New York, traveled in Europe, and built a grand home, The Mount, in Lenox, Massachusetts. In Europe, she met Henry James, who became her good friend, traveling companion, and best critic.

She wrote novels of manners about the old New York society from which she came, but her attitude was consistently critical. She also completed her most biting satire, The Custom of the Country (1913), the story of Undine Spragg's climb, marriage by marriage, from a midwestern town to New York to a French chateau. During World War I, Wharton dedicated herself to the war effort and was honored by the French government for her work with Belgian refugees. After the war, the world Wharton had known was gone.

Although she had had a book of her own poems privately printed when she was 16, it was not until after several years of married life that Wharton began to write in earnest.

died August 11, 1937, êt, near Paris, France), American author best known for her stories and novels about the upper-class society into which she was born. Although she had had a book of her own poems privately printed when she was 16, it was not until after several years of married life that Wharton began to write in earnest. Her major literary model was Henry James, whom she knew, and her work reveals James’s concern for artistic form and ethical issues.

Undine is determined to acquire money and position through marriage, even if it means multiple divorces. Summary by Elizabeth Klett.

Divorce is actually a central theme of the book, a very modern one for a 1913 novel. Its modernity echoes that of What Maisie Knew

Divorce is actually a central theme of the book, a very modern one for a 1913 novel. Its modernity echoes that of What Maisie Knew.

Considered by many as a masterpiece,& Custom of the Country& a study of the fads and antics of the modern American upper class.

Her works show the lives of people of the late nineteenth century, the times of decline in American history. She was the first woman to receive the Pulitzer Prize for Literature in 1921. Considered by many as a masterpiece,& Custom of the Country& a study of the fads and antics of the modern American upper class. It tells the story of spoiled and selfish but at the same time amazingly charming Undine Spragg, who tries to get into New York& high society. Through her life full of affairs, the book describes a social behavior of a person who is well educated and extremely disenchanted.

Wharton's writing is elegant perfection, but I was happy to have read this on my Kindle - where I was frequently checking vocabulary definitions. Otherwise I might have needed a dictionary on my lap as well as the book.

This is somewhat of a saga and follows the social climbing exploits of an excessively spoiled young woman, Undine Spragg, who, for reasons unexplained, believes everyone owes her everything and anything she wants. She begins by making constant demands on her mother and father, eventually nearly ruining them financially. Wharton's writing is elegant perfection, but I was happy to have read this on my Kindle - where I was frequently checking vocabulary definitions.

Somewhat naturally, it is a book about divorce, still considered an indecent topic for literature at that time. Wharton explores with satire and wisdom divorce as a distinctly American custom on the eve of the twentieth century

Book by Eadith Wharton
  • This is Edith Wharton's real masterpiece. Before reading this novel recently (I'd hardly heard of it before), I'd read her much more famous "Age of Innocence" and "House of Mirth." I thought they were okay -- beautiful descriptive passages, brilliant flashes of psychological and political insight, but with boring characters and lame story lines. "The Custom of the Country" has all the fine qualities you expect to find in a good Wharton novel, but with an absolutely amazing protagonist -- Undine. "The Custom of the Country" is "Vanity Fair," with its much paler Becky Sharp, squared. This is what Thackeray would have written if he'd had a much keener and colder eye -- and a blacker sense of humor. This is now in my novelistic top ten -- along with (if you want to know some other books I like before taking my advice and buying/reading this): "Moby-Dick," "The Man Without Qualities," "Blood Meridian," "Remembrance of Things Past," and Burroughs' last major novel "The Western Lands."

  • This was my first Edith Wharton book, and the lady certainly could write. This is somewhat of a saga and follows the social climbing exploits of an excessively spoiled young woman, Undine Spragg, who, for reasons unexplained, believes everyone owes her everything and anything she wants. She begins by making constant demands on her mother and father, eventually nearly ruining them financially. She marries and destroys the life of a naïve but accommodating young man with social standing she desires. She marries again and again in her quest for great wealth and position, disappointed in some way each time. Nothing is ever enough for Undie. She leaves upheaval and destruction in her wake throughout the book.

    Wharton's writing is elegant perfection, but I was happy to have read this on my Kindle - where I was frequently checking vocabulary definitions. Otherwise I might have needed a dictionary on my lap as well as the book. I felt some of this was overdone to an extreme, but an author can't alter their 'voice'. If she wants to use obscure words, she certainly may. Perhaps I retained a few in my more normal brain.

    Although an ambitious work and beautifully written, none of the characters were likeable. Undie's first husband, Ralph, was appealing, but, when negotiating their divorce and custody of their son, he does something beyond stupid just when he has information which could destroy her.

    I've been told all of Edith Wharton's novels involve the social strata of turn-of-the-century New York City. While I love the era, I think it will be a while before I endeavor to pick up my second one. However, if you enjoy gorgeous writing, you should read this one.

  • In The Custom of the Country Edith Wharton uses biting satire to create one of the most callous self indolent characters ever construed onto paper. But it is the subtle brilliance of Ms. Wharton's writing that captures the epitome of the aristocratic hierarchy of the early 20th century and follows its main attraction that is Ms. Undine Spragg as she aims to climb the social ladder of monetary pursuits by any means and will not stop as long as her mirror reflects her commented beauty and youth, that is what makes this a rediscovered gem of a classic. Told in a watcher in the window style the reader is given a full length view of character's inner most thoughts and desires. Although on the surface The Custom of the Country may seem a dated work that centers on a selfish young woman who destroys lives of everyone she comes in contact with, the patient reader may discover multifaceted passages in this title. Not only does Ms. Wharton capture and effectively fashion rancor toward her monetary endowed characters but she also seizes complicated behaviors and "customs" of marriage, other social classes and nationalities that may lead to some entertaining debates for any interested book discussion group to pass the time with.

    A little patience is asked of the reader who decides to explore this sometimes overlooked classic, Ms. Wharton writes in the flourishing descriptive style and the contemporary reader may find too much is asked of them and stop reading within a few chapters but please don't. Stay with this one, you may end up really loving The Custom of the Country like I did. I find these kinds of titles pull me in if I let them and just enjoy the experience, although I enjoyed The House of Mirth a little more than The Custom of the Country I would still recommend this title for those who would like to find a forgotten classic about the magnetic aristocratic world of the early 20th century.

  • The book is of unlikely interest except to those who want to dig deeper into Edith Wharton's writings. This seems like a middle-tier book for her: not as good as Age of Innocence or House of Mirth, but stars an unsympathetic female (hard to call her a protagonist) who lacks any emotional qualities or empathy and who dedicates herself to acquiring luxury and status regardless of whom she hurts in doing so. Of course, luxury and status leaves her feeling empty and wanting to find even more. She is not the most realistic character, but she would make an even better character if recast today.