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ePub The First Part of King Henry IV (The New Cambridge Shakespeare) (Pt.1) download

by Herbert Weil,Judith Weil,William Shakespeare

ePub The First Part of King Henry IV (The New Cambridge Shakespeare) (Pt.1) download
Author:
Herbert Weil,Judith Weil,William Shakespeare
ISBN13:
978-0521226820
ISBN:
0521226821
Language:
Publisher:
Cambridge University Press (March 28, 1997)
Category:
Subcategory:
History & Criticism
ePub file:
1296 kb
Fb2 file:
1664 kb
Other formats:
lrf lrf docx mbr
Rating:
4.5
Votes:
296

The New Cambridge Shakespeare appeals to students worldwide for its .

The New Cambridge Shakespeare appeals to students worldwide for its up-to-date scholarship and emphasis on performance. King Henry IV, Part 1 (Wars of the Roses, William Shakespeare Henry IV, Part 1 is a history play by William Shakespeare, believed to have been written no later than 1597.

The New Cambridge Shakespeare appeals to students worldwide for its . By 1594 Shakespeare had become a member and part owner of an acting company called The Lord Chamberlain's Men, where he soon became the company's principal playwright. His plays enjoyed great popularity and high critical acclaim in the newly built Globe Theatre.

Publisher: Cambridge University Press. pp i-i. Export citation.

King Richard II (The New Cambridge Shakespeare). Measure for Measure (The New Cambridge Shakespeare). Simultaneous Device Usage: Up to 4 simultaneous devices, per publisher limits.

The First part of King Henry the Fourth. KING HENRY IV. It seems then that the tidings of this broil Brake off our business for the Holy Land. Here is a dear, a true industrious friend, Sir Walter Blunt, new lighted from his horse

The First part of King Henry the Fourth. Shakespeare homepage Henry IV, part 1 Entire play. ACT I. SCENE I. London. Here is a dear, a true industrious friend, Sir Walter Blunt, new lighted from his horse. Stain'd with the variation of each soil Betwixt that Holmedon and this seat of ours; And he hath brought us smooth and welcome news. The Earl of Douglas is discomfited: Ten thousand bold Scots, two and twenty knights, Balk'd in their own blood did Sir Walter see On Holmedon's plains.

The New Cambridge Shakespeare appeals to readers worldwide for its up-to-date scholarship and emphasis on performance

The New Cambridge Shakespeare appeals to readers worldwide for its up-to-date scholarship and emphasis on performance. All titles in series: A Midsummer Night's Dream. Professor Judith Weil (e. Professor Herbert Weil (e. Professor Brian Gibbons (e. Professor A. R. Braunmuller (e. At the time of publication, Albert was Professor of English at the University of California in Los Angeles. View sample pages of new titles. Cambridge Go. Digital resources and material.

And how do you rate Shakespeare, really? I liked the plot. Henry VI Part 2 is bloody violent, with lots of heads rolling everywhere

And how do you rate Shakespeare, really? I liked the plot. Henry VI Part 2 is bloody violent, with lots of heads rolling everywhere. And continued back-biting and dissension in the ranks of the upper classes, which are continually at war in France, if not with each other. The horrors of the war of the roses, vaulting ambition of a series of dukes, a prayerful king and a businesswoman queen. This play has it all. It ends in such a depressing but true tone of the cyclical nature of the next series of murders and wars and for what!

The New Cambridge Shakespeare appeals to students worldwide for its up-to-date scholarship and .

Series: The New Cambridge Shakespeare.

This edition offers a strongly theatrical perspective on the origins of The First Part of King Henry IV and the history of its interpretation. In their introduction the editors clarify the play's surprising, decentralized dramatic structure, questioning the recent assumption that the drama focuses on the education of Prince Hal. They call attention to the effects of civil war on a broad range of relationships. Falstaff's unpredictable vitality is explored, together with important contemporary values of honor, friendship, festivity and reformation.
  • Reading a side by side translation of a Shakespeare play is very useful when the original language is too difficult to grasp. The translation in this book was good, but the shaded color that was superimposed on the text of the modern translation was distracting. There is no need for it since the original is always on the left side of the page and the translation is on the right side. I also would have preferred that the name of each speaker in the play would be on the top of the translated text not just on the original text. This would allow the reader to continue reading without having to refer back to the original to find out who is saying what!

  • I read King Henry IV, Part 1 for a local book club. It is the first time since high school that I have read any of Shakespeare's works. I am glad this was my reintroduction. I enjoyed the play and look forward to reading other works by the Bard.

    Shakespeare presents two difficulties for me... The first is the language. Most of it is easily enough understood... Or at least the context is. There is some, however, that is so archaic it gives me pause. The second is following the story in play format. I found it helpful to have a dictionary close by for reference and to read the play aloud as opposed to trying to read it quietly. I think it would be even better if it could be performed by a group as opposed to me alone.

    The play reminds me of the mastery of Shakespeare. The lines are poetic and the imagery is fantastic. There was more than one quote that really stuck with me and I'll ponder these lines long after. I also enjoyed learning something of a history that wasn't taught when I was in school.

    I am looking forward to Part 2 and would encourage anyone to give King Henry IV a chance.

  • Not much to say honestly, because I haven't got a thing on Shakespeare except to say I love his work, his characters, his wit, his charm, the comedy, the tragedy, and...well you probably get my point.

    Henry IV Part I is personally my favorite of his plays and I take the typical stance of being a Falstaff sympathizer (expedited by Roger Allam's portrayal at Shakespeare's Globe and Orson Welles' in Chimes at Midnight), but enjoy all the characters and their interactions.

    Folger Shakespeare Library has been an excellent resource for me, as I came to these plays with absolutely no knowledge of Shakespeare whatsoever. There are word translations on one side of the page and text summaries for each act, and the occasional illustration. Can't ask for more for $6, 5 stars.

  • Sir John Falstaff was the only interesting character:

    What is honour? a word. What is that word, honour? air. A trim reckoning!—Who hath it? he that died o' Wednesday. Doth he feel it? no. Doth be hear it? no. Is it insensible, then? yea, to the dead. But will it not live with the living? no. Why? detraction will not suffer it. Therefore I'll none of it: honour is a mere scutcheon:—and so ends my catechism.

  • Having just completed Henry IV Part I, I must say that I came away delighted and impressed with Shakespeare's genius once again. Shakespeare's ability to intertwine the arduous dichotomy of the impcomparable comedy of Falstaff and the meaningful history of Henry IV, Prince Hal, & Hotspur is impressive to say the least. It comes as no surprise that this was one of Shakespeare's most popularly staged plays during his day and enjoyed an unusually long stage run.
    Falstaff is undoubtedly the most infamously famous literary comic character in the history of English literature. The scenes of him being robbed by Prince Hal, feigning his death, stabbing the already deceased Hotspur in the leg while claiming victory, and his employment of beggars as his foot soldiers galvanize the comic aspect of the play and make for a hilarious & farcical sublot. Interestingly, in the bar in Eastcheap, Prince Hal alludes to his future persecution of Falstaff when he is crowned king.
    I strongly recommend Henry IV Part I to all Shakespeare aficionados seeing as I deem it in the top five of all Shakespeare's works along with Hamlet, Julius Caesar, Macbeth, & Henry V. Now on to Part II. Adieu.
    "The better part of valor is discretion." - Falstaff

  • I love the Folger editions of these books. I don't want my students using "no fear Shakespeare" because I want them to learn to read these themselves. The Folger editions are like "no fear Shakespeare" for smart people only because it doesn't spell everything out. You still have to understand the text. They have the definitions on one side of the page and the text on the other. It's certainly handy.

  • Wordcraft: New English to Old English Dictionary and Thesaurus
    If you only know Shakespeare by the fact that he existed and was a play writer and you decide that you want to read one of his history plays and the history play that you pick happens to be King Henry IV part one then just reading the text alone will be extremely confusing. Barbara Hodgdon has done an amazing job editing this play and her notes are extremely helpful besides her explication of this play there are historical graphics and historical maps that will help you when reading or seeing the works of Shakespeare. This book is more than a college textbook, it is enjoyable historical reading. Craig Barr.

  • This is not the hardcover blue Yale Shakespeare volume I expected (see photo of what I was expecting). I need the blue hardcover version to complete the 40 volume set. Disappointed.