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by Roger Woolhouse,John Locke

ePub An Essay Concerning Human Understanding (Penguin Classics) download
Author:
Roger Woolhouse,John Locke
ISBN13:
978-0140434828
ISBN:
0140434828
Language:
Publisher:
Penguin Classics; Revised ed. edition (February 1, 1998)
Category:
Subcategory:
History & Criticism
ePub file:
1169 kb
Fb2 file:
1218 kb
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Rating:
4.1
Votes:
676

This book is where John Locke laid down his "Tabula Rasa" and this ideology has carried on through centuries (and even .

This book is where John Locke laid down his "Tabula Rasa" and this ideology has carried on through centuries (and even up to today for those who aren't educated enough to know he's actually been proven wrong. In fact most modern philosophers have been proven wrong on most of the things they wrote). Nonetheless, this is a great book and an interesting read.

An Essay Concerning Human Understanding is a work by John Locke concerning the foundation of human knowledge and understanding. It first appeared in 1689 (although dated 1690) with the printed title An Essay Concerning Humane Understanding. He describes the mind at birth as a blank slate (tabula rasa, although he did not use those actual words) filled later through experience.

John Locke (author), Roger Woolhouse (author of notes,author of. .

While defending these central claims with vigorous common sense, Locke offers many incidental - and highly influential - reflections on space and time, meaning, free will and personal identity. The result is a powerful, pioneering work, which, together with Descartes's works, largely set the agenda for modern philosophy Added to basket.

By (author) John Locke, Notes by Roger Woolhouse. Rejecting the theory that some knowledge is innate in us, Locke argues that it derives from sense perceptions and experience, as analysed and developed by reason. While defending these central claims with vigorous common sense, Locke offers many incidental - and highly influential - reflections on space and time, meaning, free will and personal identity.

An Essay concerning Human Understanding

An Essay concerning Human Understanding. Source: An Essay Concerning Human Understanding (1689). Chapter II no innate principles in the mind. This opinion I have at large examined already; and, I suppose, what I have said in the foregoing book will be much more easily admitted, when I have shown whence the understanding may get all the ideas it has, and by what ways and degrees they may come into the mind; for which I shall appeal to every one’s own observation and.

Электронная книга "An Essay Concerning Human Understanding", John Locke. Эту книгу можно прочитать в Google Play Книгах на компьютере, а также на устройствах Android и iOS. Выделяйте текст, добавляйте закладки и делайте заметки, скачав книгу "An Essay Concerning Human Understanding" для чтения в офлайн-режиме.

Published June 26th 1997 by Penguin Classics. Paperback, 786 pages.

Published May 17th 2012. Author(s): John Locke. Published June 26th 1997 by Penguin Classics. ISBN: 0140434828 (ISBN13: 9780140434828).

Concerning Human Understanding By: John Locke Format: Paperback Number of Pages: 816 Vendor: Penguin Classics. For more than seventy years, Penguin has been the leading publisher of classic literature in the English-speaking world.

Title: An Essay Concerning Human Understanding By: John Locke Format: Paperback Number of Pages: 816 Vendor: Penguin Classics. Publication Date: 1998 Dimensions: . X . 7 (inches) ISBN: 0140434828 ISBN-13: 9780140434828 Stock No: WW34828. Publisher's Description. With more than 1,700 titles, Penguin Classics represents a global bookshelf of the best works throughout history and across genres and disciplines.

Locke, John: A Letter Concerning Toleration A look at A Letter Concerning Toleration, written in.

Locke, John: A Letter Concerning Toleration A look at A Letter Concerning Toleration, written in the 1680s by John Locke, who advocated religious toleration. Courtesy of Folger Shakespeare Library; CC-BY-SA . (A Britannica Publishing Partner). Locke remained in Holland for more than five years (1683–89). He begins by claiming that the sources of all knowledge are, first, sense experience (the red colour of a rose, the ringing sound of a bell, the taste of salt, and so on) and, second, reflection (one’s awareness that one is thinking, that one is happy or sad, that one is having a certain sensation, and so on).

Contents1 An Essay concerning human Understanding by John . An Essay concerning human Understanding Book I: innate ideas.

Contents1 An Essay concerning human Understanding by John Locke1. 1 An Essay concerning human Understanding Book I: innate ideas1. Essay concerning Human Understanding tries to identify the various faculties of our mind, and how ideas are formed. Thus, we may discover the limits of knowledge, and therefore, we can identify an area of thought where truth is attainable, and another where this is impossible. In the first book, Locke attacks the doctrine of innate ideas, found in Descartes.

In An Essay Concerning Human Understanding, first published in 1690, John Locke (1632-1704) provides a complete account of how we acquire everyday, mathematical, natural scientific, religious and ethical knowledge. Rejecting the theory that some knowledge is innate in us, Locke argues that it derives from sense perceptions and experience, as analysed and developed by reason. While defending these central claims with vigorous common sense, Locke offers many incidental - and highly influential - reflections on space and time, meaning, free will and personal identity. The result is a powerful, pioneering work, which, together with Descartes's works, largely set the agenda for modern philosophy.For more than seventy years, Penguin has been the leading publisher of classic literature in the English-speaking world. With more than 1,700 titles, Penguin Classics represents a global bookshelf of the best works throughout history and across genres and disciplines. Readers trust the series to provide authoritative texts enhanced by introductions and notes by distinguished scholars and contemporary authors, as well as up-to-date translations by award-winning translators.
  • I read Locke's Two Treatises of Government in the late 1970s or even earlier. I wanted to know how our government became so unwieldy and I needed something to contrast it with. Locke came well recommended. I didn't know about his book on understanding or I would have read it then, too. In those days, the lines drawn between liberty and progressivism or socialism were not drawn as clearly. I needed to be able to check the thinking and logic of others around me and in fact, more precisely, my own. To this end I read books on logic, like Jevons and Bacon. I bought this book to round out my library and further my understanding of my fellow Americans. To understand how we come to understand can be an important factor in our relations with other people.

  • Large margins for notes, however highlighted ink bleeds right through. The cover tears very easily, as do the pages. However, this was a perfect copy for a highschool history class.

  • This book is where John Locke laid down his "Tabula Rasa" and this ideology has carried on through centuries (and even up to today for those who aren't educated enough to know he's actually been proven wrong. In fact most modern philosophers have been proven wrong on most of the things they wrote). Nonetheless, this is a great book and an interesting read. There are four "books" within this book and each chapter has a lot of rich information. It's a very dense text with Locke covering a lot throughout. This is (arguably) one of the top influential philosophical texts that has been written and it's studied in modern philosophy courses at my university. I would recommend this book to anyone that's a novice to philosophy.

  • Beautiful! I read and finished Mr. Locke's book, and can't help but feel him a great friend. I invested much time in learning his philosophy that by the time I was done with his book, I could not help but feel a bit melancholy. You will learn much from this book, and will gain even more from daily contemplation! The book itself is not worth buying in hardcover, but I give it five stars because I just love this book that much.

  • My purpose in purchasing this book was to read the full text as John Lock wrote it. Most of the texts popularly available are abridgements. However, a down side to the text is that it does not include a table of contents and the chapter headings, which most of the abridgements do. In any case, this book is one of the most important in modern philosophy, representing the English tradition of modesty in what human beings can know. Of course, it is empiricism at its best as well as at its worst. Yet, his clear objective is to get everyone to have more modesty in their beliefs, and therefore, they will be more tolerant of the beliefs of others. In our ideological age, these are good reminders.

  • This must be a very good book because it's very famous and very long. The best bit of this book is the chapter on infinity, I think. (Pages 145-155.) But it has no editorial introduction to give the book context, and the syntax is tricky to understand unless you're familiar with regional British English. It's long-winded and repetitive, and the subject matter is of no great consequence.

    The infinity chapter gives an excellent explanation of the issues surrounding infinity-related concepts. It's highly relevant to mathematicians who might want to understand why there's any difficulty. Nowadays, mathematics is full of infinities, without philosophical discussion. In Locke's day, this subject was still controversial.

    Concerning the lack of editorial introduction, there isn't even a basic outline of the publication history. So I don't know which edition this is. Apparently Locke's "Essay concerning human understanding" was first outlined in a 1688 publication. (See page xvii.) Then one other source (not this book) tells me that there were 4 editions in Locke's lifetime, the first two being in 1689 and 1694. Another source says 1690, 1694, 1695 and 1700. But page 15 of this book mentions a ninth edition, upon which this publication is apparently based. On page xx, the author's foreword states that this is the 6th edition. So it's anyone's guess whether this is an edition which Locke saw, or whether it is some later adaptation.

    The date of publication matters because one naturally wishes to compare the ideas in a book with the ideas in other books around that time, to evaluate influences etc. This book was written in the time of Boyle and Newton. (See page xvi.)

    If you're not a native speaker of British English, with some familiarity with regional variations in sentence structure, you might have difficulties with this book. Often the conjunctions or prepositions are omitted, as one might do in regional spoken English. Very often, I had to re-read sentences to determine where the clauses started and ended. This makes the reading a little tiring.

    The text is interspersed with some kind of a flame-war with some trolling Bishop who seemed to know nothing about Locke's subject. These pointless responses to pointless open letters are not a really good use of paper. The author must have been very rich to afford to include so much waffle along with the main text.

    All in all, I think this is the kind of book you really should buy and put on your shelf for historical reasons. I wouldn't recommend actually reading it. It's a big book at a low price. A real bargain!

  • This book is a required read for most philosophy programs across the country for both undergraduate and graduate studies. If you're not in a college class where you can find other minds to chew this with I would recommend reading journal articles or other writings from philosophers that responded in some way to the premise this author is putting forth.

  • Missing every other page for most of the book which makes it pretty much unreadable. The ink is printed terribly and some words are impossible to make out. Waste of money.