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by Stephen Prickett

ePub Narrative, Religion and Science: Fundamentalism versus Irony, 1700-1999 download
Author:
Stephen Prickett
ISBN13:
978-0521811361
ISBN:
0521811368
Language:
Publisher:
Cambridge University Press; 1 edition (April 29, 2002)
Category:
Subcategory:
History & Criticism
ePub file:
1400 kb
Fb2 file:
1174 kb
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Rating:
4.5
Votes:
178

An increasing number of contemporary scientists, philosophers and theologians downplay their professional authority and describe their work as simply "telling stories about the world".

An increasing number of contemporary scientists, philosophers and theologians downplay their professional authority and describe their work as simply "telling stories about the world". If this is so, literary criticism can and should be applied to all these fields. Yet story telling is neither innocent nor empty-handed. Register, rhetoric, and imagery all manipulate in their own ways. Above all, irony emerges as the natural mode of our modern fragmented culture.

Narrative, Religion, and Science book.

Stephen Prickett is Professor of English at Duke University, North Carolina

Stephen Prickett is Professor of English at Duke University, North Carolina. He took his BA at Cambridge (Trinity Hall) and subsequently did postgraduate work in Oxford (University College) and back in Cambridge, where he took his PhD in 1968.

Prickett wants to carve out a space for religion against postmodern relativism. his book can probably be read with most pleasure by the neophyte student of postmodernism. Choice a tour de force. it contributes provocatively and valuably to the case for regarding the narrative relation between science and religion as being much closer than some might be prone to acknowledge. The Journal of Religion. Prickett wants to use Rortyan irony to show that science doesn't trump religion and we can have a happy pluralism that accommodates religion and science without privileging either one. The result is sloppy.

An increasing number of contemporary scientists, philosophers and theologians downplay their professional authority and describe their work as simply 'telling stories about the world'. If this is so, Stephen Prickett argues, literary criticism can be applied to all these fields. Such new-found modesty is not necessarily postmodernist scepticism towards all grand narratives, but it often conceals a widespread confusion and naïvety about what 'telling stories', 'description' or 'narrative', actually involves.

Narrative, Religion and Science: Fundamentalism versus Irony, 1700-1999 By Stephen Prickett Publisher: C U P 2002 290 Pages ISBN: 0521811368, 0521009839 PDF 1 MB. An increasing number of contemporary scientists, philosophers and theologians downplay their professional authority and describe their work as simply "telling stories about the world". Archive Books related to "Narrative, Religion and Science: Fundamentalism versus Irony, 1700-1999": 2011-10-20Narrative, Religion and Science: Fundamentalism versus Irony, 1700-1999.

Narrative, Religion, and Science : Fundamentalism Versus Irony, 1700-1999. An increasing number of contemporary scientists, philosophers and theologians downplay their professional authority and describe their work as simply "telling stories about the world.

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his book can probably be read with most pleasure by the neophyte student of postmodernism. Please provide me with your latest book news, views and details of Waterstones’ special offers.

Stephen Prickett: Narrative, Religion and Science: Fundamentalism versus Irony, 1700-1999 Prickett shows for one thing that the pluralism of the postmodern condition is not so completely new as is sometimes supposed: Even by the seventeenth century w. .

Stephen Prickett: Narrative, Religion and Science: Fundamentalism versus Irony, 1700-1999. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2002. Prickett shows for one thing that the pluralism of the postmodern condition is not so completely new as is sometimes supposed: Even by the seventeenth century we are already looking not at a single narrative, but a profusion of incompatible and competing ones (p. 132). In fact, had he cared to, Prickett could have pointed to the pluralism of competing religious, philosophical, and political movements in the first-century Roman Empire, or the religious pluralism in the time of Gideon!

The Journal of Religion. Volume 83, Number 3 Ju. 2003. Stephen's Defense before the Sanhedrin.

The Journal of Religion. Narrative, Religion and Science: Fundamentalism versus Irony, 1700-1999.

An increasing number of contemporary scientists, philosophers and theologians downplay their professional authority and describe their work as simply "telling stories about the world". If this is so, literary criticism can and should be applied to all these fields. Yet story telling is neither innocent nor empty-handed. Register, rhetoric, and imagery all manipulate in their own ways. Above all, irony emerges as the natural mode of our modern fragmented culture. Since the eighteenth century there have been only two possible ways of understanding the world--the fundamentalist and the ironic.
  • A depressingly fluffy book that quotes from a lot of secondary sources in an attempt to reduce science's hegemony over religion and the humanities. There are plenty of holes to poke in scientific method and rhetoric (see Quine, Lakatos, Popper, Kitcher), but Prickett hasn't done too much research. The standard suspects are quoted: Derrida, Ong, Kuhn, Pinker, Polanyi, Rorty. Prickett wants to use Rortyan irony to show that science doesn't trump religion and we can have a happy pluralism that accommodates religion and science without privileging either one.

    The result is sloppy. I gave up when I reached this sentence: "Gödel's theorem would predict that it is impossible to give a satisfactorily comprehensive definition of language because we are attempting to use language to define language." (He says that Gödel was responding to "Tarki"--it's Tarski, as Cambridge's proofreader should have noticed.) Gödel's theorems deal with formal systems, and they say nothing about the colossal mess that is language, nor is it about "definitions." This sort of inexact analogizing plagues the scientific aspects of the book.

    Prickett seems much more comfortable when talking about aesthetics and theology. The sections on John Henry Newman read nicely, and he clearly looks up to C.S. Lewis as something of an inspiration. But these sections do very little to advance his thesis. At any rate, the result is foreordained: religion (Christianity, specifically--no room for Buddhists or Hindus here) is still viable! Maybe, but this book doesn't help the case.

  • I would agree with the editorial reviews above, especially with regard to the book's wide range and readability. For those interested in Kierkegaard, it is worth noting that he provides a helpful comparison between SK and Richard Rorty on the issue of irony. As the title suggests, Prickett sees the world in terms of ironists and fundamentalists, and ends up placing SK in the former camp and Rorty in the latter. According to Prickett, Rorty is guilty of developing what he labels a "closed system" with "no external reality-check." He therefore finds SK's approach of "mastered irony" far more helpful. This discussion is carried on in Brad Frazier's work, and while Frazier comes to similar conclusions he is less dismissive of Rorty's contributions.

  • Terrific encapsulation of the quandary associated with postmodernism and the conviction that grand narratives are no longer believable by the educated elite (defined as those who no longer believe in grand narratives). This confronts the view that narratives structure human knowledge so even the narrative that there are no believable narratives is a grand narrative itself.