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by Carolyn Vellenga Berman

ePub Creole Crossings: Domestic Fiction and the Reform of Colonial Slavery download
Author:
Carolyn Vellenga Berman
ISBN13:
978-0801443848
ISBN:
0801443849
Language:
Publisher:
Cornell University Press; 1 edition (November 30, 2005)
Category:
Subcategory:
History & Criticism
ePub file:
1272 kb
Fb2 file:
1777 kb
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Rating:
4.1
Votes:
213

In Creole Crossings, Carolyn Vellenga Berman examines the use of this recurring figure in such canonical . Carolyn Vellenga Berman teaches in the Department of Humanities at The New School, a university in New York City.

In Creole Crossings, Carolyn Vellenga Berman examines the use of this recurring figure in such canonical novels as Jane Eyre, Uncle Tom's Cabin, and Indiana, as well as in the antislavery discourse of the period. Creole" in its etymological sense means "brought up domestically," and Berman shows how the campaign to reform slavery in the colonies converged with literary depictions of family life.

Carolyn Vellenga Berman asserts that so-called public issues of race and slavery permeate eighteenth- and nineteenth-century French, British, and American domestic fiction. She illustrates her point by analyzing the ways in which the Creole woman born in the 'periphery' troubles plots conceived at the 'center. The argument is compelling, the writing clear and elegant. Creole Crossings is a pleasure to read. Carla L. Peterson, University of Maryland).

In Creole Crossings, Carolyn Vellenga Berman examines the use of this recurring figure in such canonical novels as Jane Eyre, Uncle Tom's Cabin, and Indiana, as well as in the antislav The character of the Creole woman-the descendant of settlers or slaves brought up on the colonial.

In Creole Crossings, Carolyn Vellenga Berman examines the use of this recurring figure in such canonical novels as Jane Eyre, Uncle Tom's Cabin, and Indiana, as well as in the antislav The character of the Creole woman-the descendant of settlers or slaves brought up on the colonial frontier-is a familiar one in nineteenth-century French, British, and American literature. In Creole Crossings, Carolyn Vellenga Berman examines the use of this recurring figure in such canonical novels as Jane Eyre, Uncle Tom's Cabin, and Indiana, as well as in the antislavery discourse of the period.

In Creole Crossings, Carolyn Vellenga Berman examines the use of this recurring figure in such canonical novels .

Carolyn Vellenga Berman. Associate Professor of Literature; Capstone Coordinator for Literature

Carolyn Vellenga Berman. Associate Professor of Literature; Capstone Coordinator for Literature. My first book, Creole Crossings: Domestic Fiction and the Reform of Colonial Slavery (Cornell UP, 2006), offered a critical cultural history of the figure of the Creole woman in nineteenth-century British, French, and American fiction, as well as in anti-slavery discourse of the period. My current book project, titled Representing the People: Dickens and Democracy in the Paper Age, rethinks the Victorian novel by examining its rivalry with Parliament in the expanding world of print publication. Introduction Domestic Fiction and Colonial Slavery. Domestic fiction in the antislavery era worked hard to disentangle colonial slavery, as deviance, from the norms of domesticity that were deemed central to the modern nation. Published by: Cornell University Press. Fiction played a powerful role in two major ideological events of the late eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries. One of these was the repudiation of colonial slavery by the preeminent slave-trading and slave-owning nations of the period, France, Great Britain, and the United States.

ISBN 0 9. ANDREW RADFORD (a1). University of Glasgow. Published online by Cambridge University Press: 08 March 2007.

October 2006 · Victorian Studies.

Indicting Domestic Fiction: Wide Sargasso Se. Creole Crossings: Domestic Fiction and the Reform of Colonial Slavery. Berman’s book focuses on the Creole identity as a result of slavery and displacement. Ithaca, NY: Cornell UP, 2006. In this specific chapter of her book, Berman focuses on Antoinette and her presumed madness. Berman is in conversation with Frantz Fanon in this chapter to discuss and argue Antoinette’s fear of unacknowledged self (174).

The character of the Creole woman―the descendant of settlers or slaves brought up on the colonial frontier―is a familiar one in nineteenth-century French, British, and American literature. In Creole Crossings, Carolyn Vellenga Berman examines the use of this recurring figure in such canonical novels as Jane Eyre, Uncle Tom's Cabin, and Indiana, as well as in the antislavery discourse of the period. "Creole" in its etymological sense means "brought up domestically," and Berman shows how the campaign to reform slavery in the colonies converged with literary depictions of family life. Illuminating a literary genealogy that crosses political, familial, and linguistic lines, Creole Crossings reveals how racial, sexual, and moral boundaries continually shifted as the century's writers reflected on the realities of slavery, empire, and the home front. Berman offers compelling readings of the "domestic fiction" of Honoré de Balzac, Charlotte Brontë, Maria Edgeworth, Harriet Jacobs, George Sand, Harriet Beecher Stowe, and others, alongside travel narratives, parliamentary reports, medical texts, journalism, and encyclopedias. Focusing on a neglected social classification in both fiction and nonfiction, Creole Crossings establishes the crucial importance of the Creole character as a marker of sexual norms and national belonging.