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ePub Patriotic Gore: Studies in the Literature of the American Civil War download

by Edmund Wilson

ePub Patriotic Gore: Studies in the Literature of the American Civil War download
Author:
Edmund Wilson
ISBN13:
978-0393312560
ISBN:
0393312569
Language:
Publisher:
W. W. Norton & Company; 8/18/94 edition (September 17, 1994)
Category:
Subcategory:
History & Criticism
ePub file:
1809 kb
Fb2 file:
1747 kb
Other formats:
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Rating:
4.4
Votes:
399

Patriotic Gore is something great; and mine is a mean summary. It is simply the most vivid book about the American Civil War that I have yet read.

Patriotic Gore is something great; and mine is a mean summary. Whitman’s Specimen Days, his sketch album of army camps and vigils beside hospital cots, is the saddest, and the most beautiful; and Mary Chesnut may yet rock my world; and the pleasures of Foote loom like Proust’s; but for now Patriotic Gore is tops.

When Edmund Wilson wrote those words in the fall of 1961, the literature of the Vietnam War had yet to be written .

When Edmund Wilson wrote those words in the fall of 1961, the literature of the Vietnam War had yet to be written, but his point remains well taken. Patriotic Gore is a remarkable survey of Civil War literature, encompassing generals, society ladies, and novelists alike. As Wilson states in the Introduction (a fascinating glimpse into Wilson's personality and politics), Patriotic Gore deals with about 30 individuals who left a lasting record of their experiences of or involvement in some aspect of the Civil War. Of course, he treats the memoirists, like Grant and Sherman, and the lesser known Mosby and Taylor.

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Patriotic Gore: Studies in the Literature of the American Civil War is a 1962 book of historical and literary criticism written by Edmund Wilson

Patriotic Gore: Studies in the Literature of the American Civil War is a 1962 book of historical and literary criticism written by Edmund Wilson.

In this long and challenging book Edmund Wilson presents a critical analysis of the works of some 30 men and women, novelists, generals, poets; politicans, diarists, who saw the Civil War at first.

Regarded by many critics as Edmund Wilson's greatest book, Patriotic Gore brilliantly portrays the vast political, spiritual, and material crisis of the Civil War as reflected in the lives and writings of some thirty representative Americans

Regarded by many critics as Edmund Wilson's greatest book, Patriotic Gore brilliantly portrays the vast political, spiritual, and material crisis of the Civil War as reflected in the lives and writings of some thirty representative Americans. His l portraits of such notable figures as Harriet Beecher Stowe, Abraham Lincoln, Ulysses S. Grant, Ambrose Bierce, Mary Chesnut, William Tecumseh Sherman, and Oliver Wendell Holmes prove Wilson to be the consummate witness to the most eloquently recorded era in American history.

The period of the American Civil War was not one in which belles lettres .

The period of the American Civil War was not one in which belles lettres flourished but it did produce a remarkable literature which mostly consists of speeches an. .In his introduction to Patriotic Gore, Edmund Wilson asks, 'Has there ever been another historical crisis of the magnitude of 1861-1865 in which so many people were so articulate?' Regarded by many critics as Wilson's greatest book, Patriotic Gore more than proves the point, brilliantly portraying the vast political, spiritual, and material crisis of the Civil War as reflected in the lives and writings of some thirty representative Americans.

This page contains details about the Nonfiction book Patriotic Gore by Edmund Wilson published in 1962. Patriotic Gore: Studies in the Literature of The American Civil War. Hardcover. This book is the 153rd greatest Nonfiction book of all time as determined by thegreatestbooks.

Civil War and 19th century American historical and literary criticism

Civil War and 19th century American historical and literary criticism. Oxford University Press. It is discursive, ranging widely from North to South, and even more widely in time.

Published in 1931, Axel's Castle was Edmund Wilson's first book of literary criticism-a landmark book that explores the evolution of the French . by Edmund Wilson.

Published in 1931, Axel's Castle was Edmund Wilson's first book of literary criticism-a landmark book that explores the evolution of the French Symbolist movement and considers its influence on six major twentieth-century writers: William Butler Yeats, P. To the Finland Station. by Edmund Wilson · Louis Menand.

Regarded by many critics as Edmund Wilson's greatest book, Patriotic Gore brilliantly portrays the vast political, spiritual, and material crisis of the Civil War as reflected in the lives and writings of some thirty representative Americans.

Critical/biographical portraits of such notable figures as Harriet Beecher Stowe, Abraham Lincoln, Ulysses S. Grant, Ambrose Bierce, Mary Chesnut, William Tecumseh Sherman, and Oliver Wendell Holmes prove Wilson to be the consummate witness to the most eloquently recorded era in American history.
  • "Patriotic Gore" was written over fifty years ago by Edmund Wilson, one of the major American literary critics of the mid-twentieth century. In 793 pages and sixteen chapters he discusses and assesses the literary work of thirty or so writers, North and South, who wrote about the Civil War or the Civil War era. They include political figures (such as Lincoln and Alexander H. Stephens), military leaders (such as Sherman, Grant, Lee, and Mosby), as well as writers of fiction and poetry. Those who enjoy literature or are interested in the period will find Wilson's insights fascinating and his graceful prose easy to read. Undoubtedly, they will also encounter new authors and gain a new understanding of American literature and culture.

    The book begins with a controversial 23-page introduction in which Wilson presents his own understanding of the Civil War--and of all modern wars--as well as of Abraham Lincoln. Even though he was born and raised in New Jersey, Wilson saw the Civil War as an imperialistic war of conquest on the part of the North, hypocritically justified by the "rabble-rousing moral issue" of slavery. In his view, Lincoln was an "uncompromising dictator" comparable to Lenin and Bismarck. Wilson's position is thought-provoking, to say the least; but it also helps prepare the reader for his dispassionate handling of all the writers he discusses. To him, they are not representatives of a noble cause and a despicable one but rather a group of perceptive men and women swept up in a catastrophic social crisis and trying to understand it as best they can. This perspective confers upon "Patriotic Gore" a rare compassion for and sympathy with the people of the era, regardless of their allegiance.

    As for the title, it was taken from the poem "Maryland, My Maryland," written early in the war, and refers to the Pratt Street Riot in Baltimore during which Southern sympathizers attacked a Massachusetts regiment en route to Washington,

  • Wilson was probably the preeminent American critic of the 20th century because he brought to his writing a great breadth and depth of learning, a sure critical sense, and a powerful, flexible and polished prose that is always suited to his subject. Moreover, when Wilson tackled a subject (as he did elsewhere, say, with Dickens) he really mastered not only his subject material, but also the history, biography and other writing that illuminated and placed it into context. Wilson brought all these exceptional qualities to this fine book, the interest of which may, however, be limited by its subjects, namely a host of authors whom we barely know and almost never read. This is not a knock on Wilson or the book; however, if you are not a dedicated student of the period, you might think twice before embarking on this obscure journey.

    As Wilson states in the Introduction (a fascinating glimpse into Wilson's personality and politics), Patriotic Gore deals with about 30 individuals who left a lasting record of their experiences of or involvement in some aspect of the Civil War. Of course, he treats the memoirists, like Grant and Sherman, and the lesser known Mosby and Taylor. Notably, both Grant's and Sherman's memoirs recently have been re-issued by Library of America, both make excellent reading, and Wilson's comments on all are most insightful. Similarly, and partly due to the Ken Burns series, Mary Chesnut and her enormous diary have become reasonably well known to this generation, and Wilson's chapter on three southern woman diarists is equally strong.

    In fact, Wilson's skills never flag. He has a wonderful chapter that more than does justice to Harriet Beecher Stowe and might even drive one to attempt Uncle Tom's Cabin. He also does as much as can be done with John De Forest, George Cable, Sidney Lanier, and a host of lesser lights. As always, Wilson is informed (he seems to have read everything these folks ever wrote), perceptive, entertaining, and skillful in mingling excerpts of his subjects' writing, telling biographical and historical detail, and his own analysis and commentary. The excerpts are especially useful because almost no one will have read much, if anything, by most of these writers. And therein lies the one weakness of the book. Wilson has done a remarkable job. He has reviewed, summarized and made sense out of a generation of writing that today is largely (and, on artistic grounds, often justifiably) ignored, and he has made it all as interesting as possible. To steal a line from another reviewer, he has read it so we don't have to. Actually, this is a little harsh. I enjoyed this book greatly and from it compiled a list of volumes that, given an eternity, I'd like to read, but probably won't. This is a pretty high recommendation. My only caution is that you either have to love Edmund Wilson, be a dedicated student of the Civil War period, or be desperately searching for a Ph.D. thesis subject to read about such luminaries as Thomas Nelson Page or Albion Tourgee.

  • Although a very lengthy book, it is highly recommended for Civil War buffs because it provides many little known details of major figures of that war and times. The book is also reasonably free of the idolatry and demonization that characterize, and mar, so many similar books. It's a pleasure to read about historic figures as human beings.

  • Not for the faint of heart.

  • Brilliant essays, among the best I have ever read on the period. The Introduction is cynical and jaundiced and has nothing to do with the essays, which are anything but cyncal. Wilson an astute student of history and personality.

  • As important today as it was when published in the 1960s, this collection of Edmund Wilson's Civil War Era literary criticism makes the case against war. Can be read cover to cover or as a reference, each topic is sufficiently compelling to consume the entire result of Wilson's nearly 20-year research into Civil War era written word.