mostraligabue
» » All the Lost Girls: Confessions of a Southern Daughter (Deep South Books)

ePub All the Lost Girls: Confessions of a Southern Daughter (Deep South Books) download

by Professor Patricia Foster

ePub All the Lost Girls: Confessions of a Southern Daughter (Deep South Books) download
Author:
Professor Patricia Foster
ISBN13:
978-0817310479
ISBN:
0817310479
Language:
Publisher:
University Alabama Press; First edition (September 8, 2000)
Category:
Subcategory:
History & Criticism
ePub file:
1821 kb
Fb2 file:
1671 kb
Other formats:
txt mbr azw lrf
Rating:
4.8
Votes:
238

All the Lost Girls book.

All the Lost Girls book. and daughters Patricia Foster’s lyrical yet often painful memoir explores the life of a white middle-class girl who grew up in rural south Alabama in the 1950s and 1960s, a time and place that did not tolerate deviation from traditional gender roles. Her mother raised Foster and her sister as honorary boys, girls with the ambition of men but the temperament of women.

This book will resonate with readers who enjoyed Kathryn Stockett's, THE HELP, Julie Kibler's, CALLING ME HOME, John Grisham's, A TIME TO KILL, Sue Monk Kidd's, THE SECRET LIFE OF BEES, and Kathleen Grissom's, THE KITCHEN HOUSE. PLEASE NOTE: This ebook contains TWO versions of this novel. Readers have the option to read with or without the southern dialect in the narrative. undoubtedly the best novel I have read in a long time.

This book has won a Southern Books Competition Award of Merit in Book Design from the Southeastern Library . In All the Lost Girls, Patricia Foster has written an incredibly lyrical and brilliantly insightful book about growing up in the South

This book has won a Southern Books Competition Award of Merit in Book Design from the Southeastern Library Association. This award is given in recognition of the book's aesthetic appeal and design and for fine craftsmanship in its printing and binding. Congratulations to author Patricia Foster, designer Michele Myatt Quinn, printer Thomson-Shore, and the University of Alabama Press. In All the Lost Girls, Patricia Foster has written an incredibly lyrical and brilliantly insightful book about growing up in the South. The writing is sheer poetry, and the story is captivating and powerful.

Saved in: Main Author: Foster, Patricia, 1948-.

Other Authors: EBSCO Publishing (Firm).

Patricia Foster grew up in Alabama in the '50s and '60s, the youngest daughter of a small-town doctor and .

Patricia Foster grew up in Alabama in the '50s and '60s, the youngest daughter of a small-town doctor and his pseudo-sophisticate wife. Her family was among the wealthiest, best educated, and most respected in the region, but due to their roots in the fields, mines, and factories of the Deep South, they could never quite escape the thought that they might be inherently inferior. Foster's memoir, All The Lost Girls, begins at the cusp of the 20th century, recounting the harsh lifestyle of toil and service that constituted her grandmother's and great-grandmother's days.

All The Lost Girls: Confessions Of A Southern Daughter - ISBNdb (books and publications). Patricia Foster is Professor Emeritus of Nursing of the Loma Linda University. author: Patricia Foster. Since 1999, she has devoted her considerable organizational skills to the success of the AAW. For three years she led the AAW as president (2001-2003), using the executive skills honed during a long and successful career.

Criminal Activity in the Deep South, 1700-1930: An Annotated Bibliography. All the Lost Girls: Confessions of a Southern Daughter.

Writing about oneself, says Patricia Foster, engages in truth but depends on the imagination, on the life just beneath the skin. All the Lost Girls: Confessions of a Southern Daughter (Deep South Books). Girl from Soldier Creek.

The Confessions of Nat Turner is a 1967 Pulitzer Prize-winning novel by . writer William Styron. Presented as a first-person narrative by historical figure Nat Turner, the novel concerns the slave revolt in Virginia in 1831

The Confessions of Nat Turner is a 1967 Pulitzer Prize-winning novel by . Presented as a first-person narrative by historical figure Nat Turner, the novel concerns the slave revolt in Virginia in 1831.

Patricia Foster's lyrical yet often painful memoir exploresthe life of a white middle-class girl who rew up in rural south Alabamain the 1950s and 1960s, a time and place that did not tolerate deviationfrom traditional gender roles. Her mother raised Foster and her sisteras "honorary boys," girls with the ambition of men but the temperamentof women.

An unhappy, intelligent woman who kept a heartbreaking secretfrom everyone close to her, Foster's mother was driven by a repressed ragethat fed her obsession for middle-class respectability.By the time Foster reached age fifteen, her efforts toreconcile the contradictory expectations that she be at once ambitiousand restrained had left her nervous and needy inside even while she triedto cultivate the appearance of the model student, sister, and daughter.It was only a psychological and physical breakdown that helped her to realizethat she couldn't save her driven, complicated mother and must struggleinstead for both understanding and autonomy.

  • I first read Patricia Foster's short stories in The Sun magazine, so found this book. Every now and then she has an absolutely magical phrase that truly captures human emotion and evokes deep truths about relationships. This book sometimes wandered into "journal" territory for me, but I enjoyed the writing style, and the honesty. Deserves a read - and will most appeal to women, particularly those who can relate to her Southern upbringing.

  • Great book! I recommend this highly to all women that were born and raised in the South.

  • It was a good read but not what I expected. Being from the south I had hoped the author would touch on more of the problems we face as southern girls

  • All the Lost Girls is a touching memoir of life in the Deep South of the 50's and 60's, but at the same time, it is the universal revelation of the mother-daughter relationship that touches all women. The question is, can we ever really know our mothers? No matter how much of their lives and dreams they choose to reveal to us, daughters are forever in that limbo of unknowing regarding their mothers. Whether it is competition for the father's love or favored status within the family, children, especially girls, are constantly competing with their mothers to be the best, not only to be the best and make her proud of you, but also to be better than she is. Here we find Patricia Foster, second daughter in a family only one generation removed from dire poverty and ignorance, who is raised in middle class splendor by a bright and ambitious mother and a doctor father. His status elevates the family to heights only given to professionals--doctors, lawyers etc., and her mother is determined that her daughters will have the talents and advantages that she was denied. They take every lesson available in a fifty mile radius of Foley, Alabama, a small town between the Gulf of Mexico and Mobile. Alas, Patricia's older sister, Jean, always seemed to be the better of the two, leaving Patricia to feel lost and without accomplishment, falling short of her parents's expectations. It takes years for her to make the break she must make to be her own person and even more years to mend the break with her parents. However, she realizes at age thirty that she has become her own person and that she has overcome the uncertainty and lack of self confidence of her youth. At last, she can be friends with her parents and relish the deep love and understanding she has longed for all her life. Patricia's story is a mirror of so many girls who feel they cannot live up to their mother's expectations and who feel inferior to them. Her revelation is that her mother's prodding was for love and even if to shed light on herself, she wanted her daughters's accomplishments to be embelishments for them to carry forward into the world.

  • Patricia Foster has taken us into the intimacy of her family and made us feel not like strangers but like we too are a part of that amazingly complex, intelligent, and creative group of people. I am certain that it was not easy to write in such a revealing way because Southern women are taught that if you don't talk about problems they will go away and no one will ever know. I found it extremely brave of Foster to break that mold and come forward with facts that exposed not only herself but her mother as well. After all, what makes her admired mother tick was one of the best kept secrets in town! I feel that Patricia Foster's writing is comparable to the witty self-deprecatory style of Anne Lamott and the scandously revealing style of Kathryn Harrison. I would place this book with the best of the best.

  • Not a children's book -- including sibling rape early on -- Foster's autobiography rings true to all women -- especially Southern women and, even more so, the Southern woman reared in the 1950s. Foster reveals the struggle of the maturing Southern belle, expected to nurture the socially-expected assets of the charm school graduate as she beomes a formidable competitor in a man's world. Fearlessly, Foster airs her own familial dirty laundry as she offers understanding to those still carrying unnecessary luggage.

  • This book has won a Southern Books Competition Award of Merit in Book Design from the Southeastern Library Association. This award is given in recognition of the book's aesthetic appeal and design and for fine craftsmanship in its printing and binding. Congratulations to author Patricia Foster, designer Michele Myatt Quinn, printer Thomson-Shore, and the University of Alabama Press.