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ePub The Narnian: The Life and Imagination of C. S. Lewis download

by Alan Jacobs

ePub The Narnian: The Life and Imagination of C. S. Lewis download
Author:
Alan Jacobs
ISBN13:
978-0060766900
ISBN:
0060766905
Language:
Publisher:
HarperSanFrancisco; 1st edition (October 11, 2005)
Category:
Subcategory:
History & Criticism
ePub file:
1175 kb
Fb2 file:
1561 kb
Other formats:
mbr mobi lit doc
Rating:
4.3
Votes:
696

Alan Jacobs is professor of English at Wheaton College in Illinois. He is the author of several books, including most recently The Narnian, a biography of C. S. Lewis.

Alan Jacobs is professor of English at Wheaton College in Illinois. His literary and cultural criticism has appeared in a wide range of periodicals, including the Boston Globe, The American Scholar, First Things, Books & Culture, and The Oxford American. Библиографические данные. The Narnian: The Life and Imagination of C. Издание: иллюстрированное, перепечатанное.

Alan Jacobs masterfully tells the story of the original Narnian

Alan Jacobs masterfully tells the story of the original Narnian. From Lewis's childhood days in Ireland playing with his brother, Warnie, to his horrific experiences in the trenches during World War I, to his friendship with J. R. Tolkien (and other members of the "Inklings"), and his remarkable late-life marriage to Joy Davidman, Jacobs traces the events and people that shaped Lewis's philosophy, theology, and fiction.

Whether he's looking into Lewis's life or imagination, Jacobs never loses track of either. It's an incredibly difficult task for the biographer of a person who spent so much time in "the life of the mind," and Jacobs accomplishes it admirably.

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Alan Jacobs (born 1958) is a scholar of English literature, writer, and literary critic. Lewis (Harper, 2005). Shaming the Devil: Essays in Truthtelling (Eerdmans, 2004). Must Christianity Be Violent?

Alan Jacobs (born 1958) is a scholar of English literature, writer, and literary critic  . Must Christianity Be Violent?

Alan Jacobs has dedicated his biography of Lewis to the aspects most important in the author's life; therefore, it is not a straight-forward, chronological . The Narnian is a biography of .

Alan Jacobs has dedicated his biography of Lewis to the aspects most important in the author's life; therefore, it is not a straight-forward, chronological telling. Rather it is a mixed dish of biography, criticism and a little speculation into the life of one of the twentieth century's greatest writers and defenders of the Christian faith. Although it covers the basic facts of Lewis' life as competently as any other biography, the real strength of Jacobs' work lies in the fascinating discussions of Lewis' thought processes and religious/literary development.

Электронная книга "The Narnian: The Life and Imagination of C. Lewis", Alan Jacobs. Эту книгу можно прочитать в Google Play Книгах на компьютере, а также на устройствах Android и iOS. Выделяйте текст, добавляйте закладки и делайте заметки, скачав книгу "The Narnian: The Life and Imagination of C. Lewis" для чтения в офлайн-режиме.

The Chronicles of Narnia (seven-book series) The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe (Book Two) . The Narnian The Life and Imagination of . Lewis by Alan Jacobs. Harper San Francisco: Toronto, 2005.

The Chronicles of Narnia (seven-book series) The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe (Book Two); HarperCollins: Toronto, 2005.

The White Witch, Aslan, fauns and talking beasts, centaurs and epic battles between good and evil -- all these have become a part of our collective imagination through the classic volumes of The Chronicles of Narnia. Over the past half century, children everywhere have escaped into this world and delighted in its wonders and enchantments. Yet what we do know of the man who created Narnia? This biography sheds new light on the making of the original Narnian, C. S. Lewis himself.

Lewis was one of the intellectual giants of the twentieth century and arguably the most influential religious writer of his day. An Oxford don and scholar of medieval literature, he loved to debate philosophy at his local pub, and his wartime broadcasts on the basics of Christian belief made him a celebrity in his native Britain. Yet one of the most intriguing aspects of Clive Staples Lewis remains a mystery. How did this middle-aged Irish bachelor turn to the writing of stories for children -- stories that would become among the most popular and beloved ever written?

Alan Jacobs masterfully tells the story of the original Narnian. From Lewis's childhood days in Ireland playing with his brother, Warnie, to his horrific experiences in the trenches during World War I, to his friendship with J. R. R. Tolkien (and other members of the "Inklings"), and his remarkable late-life marriage to Joy Davidman, Jacobs traces the events and people that shaped Lewis's philosophy, theology, and fiction. The result is much more than a conventional biography of Lewis: Jacobs tells the story of a profound and extraordinary imagination. For those who grew up with Narnia, or for those just discovering it, The Narnian tells a remarkable tale of a man who knew great loss and great delight, but who knew above all that the world holds far more richness and meaning than the average eye can see.

  • I started reading Alan Jacobs's The Narnian under the impression that it was an intellectual biography. It is certainly that, but it also packs in a lot of traditional biographical information as well as a great chunk of literary biography. In other words, it's a far-ranging, well-rounded book on Lewis's life, imagination, and contributions to literature.

    Jacobs thoroughly covers Lewis's entire life and makes time for all of Lewis's literary and scholarly work. I had read Lewis's Surprised by Joy and to read a biographical account of the same events, without the pseudonyms for the terrible schools and teachers Lewis had, was enlightening. Jacobs also helps to fill in some of the gaps Lewis intentionally left in his autobiography, such as the events of his service in World War I. Jacobs does a very good job examining Lewis's growth as a person and a thinker and balancing it with the more traditional biographical material, such as places visited, friendships made, schools attended, books written, and relatives and friends lost. Whether he's looking into Lewis's life or imagination, Jacobs never loses track of either. It's an incredibly difficult task for the biographer of a person who spent so much time in "the life of the mind," and Jacobs accomplishes it admirably.

    Having already been familiar with the outlines of Lewis's life and body of work, I especially appreciated The Narnian for two things--the time given to the difficult topic of Lewis's relationship with Mrs. Moore, the mother of a friend killed in World War I, and the sections spent on Lewis's excellent but less well-known scholarly work on medieval and renaissance literature. Mrs. Moore, with whom Lewis had a sketchy relationship prior to his conversion but whom he had vowed to look after in the event of his friend's death, has sometimes been used to slander Lewis. Jacobs provides--within the limits of our knowledge, since Lewis was notoriously tight-lipped about his duty toward her--great detail and context to the relationship and its development, especially in the aftermath of Lewis's conversion (Mrs. Moore was and apparently remained a staunch atheist).

    The sections on Lewis's scholarly works are especially good and should spur more people to read books like The Discarded Image or The Allegory of Love. Lewis's thinking on God, art, and literature were inextricably bound up with his love of medieval and renaissance literature, and discussion of his books on those topics is sadly lacking even among Lewis's fans and students today.

    The only problem I had with the book is minor--some of Jacobs's sentences are simply too complex and convoluted. You can get lost in them. The book by and large is an easy, brisk read but in perhaps one or two places per chapter his writing collapses under its own weight. Again, a minor problem, but one you should be aware of so you don't get discouraged when encountering it. A few reviewers have pointed out perceived problems with the book, such as Jacobs's supposed reliance on Wilson's flawed biography, but since Jacobs never quotes Wilson without correcting or totally discarding what Wilson has to say, I can hardly see the merit in this objection. Throughout the book Jacobs shows good critical sense in the treatment of his sources.

    If you're looking for a good introduction to Lewis's art and thinking I have to tell you to read Lewis first. But if you've already done so, this is an excellent place to start digging into the many layers of Lewis's imagination.

    Highly recommended.

  • I loved this book! I have read so many of CS Lewis's works & have always looked up to him, and this book made me feel almost like I know him. It really was fascinating to see how the people in his life showed up in his writing. I agree with another reviewer who said that it's clear the author admires Lewis, but he doesn't idolize him -- and that makes the book all the more believable. I'm not a big biography reader, but this one was different because it helps the reader understand how the events of Lewis's life shaped him into the writer & thinker that he was.

  • Hands down one of the best biographies I have ever read. Jacobs can really write, as could Lewis, which makes this a joy to read.

    Jacobs' approach is that of intellectual biographer. Meaning, he's walking us through the development of Lewis' thought and imagination. This is a great approach, but it can make things a little confusing at points because he doesn't move us through Lewis' life chronologically. But once you can get the basics of Lewis' life to hang in the back of your mind, it's no big deal.

    I've read several biographies of Lewis, and this is by far the best. Get it and read it!!!! Seriously, do it. For real. Right now.

  • Very in-depth. If you really want to get to know the heart, mind, and imagination behind The Narnian, this is a great read. I originally got if from the library but loved the book so much I bought it on my Kindle so I can read it over and over. Very inspiration for anyone who is an aspiring writer. Hope this helps you make your choice :)

  • This is a very good biography of C. S. Lewis. Jacobs is a skillful writer and has a great knack for weaving Lewis' own writing and ideas into the events of his life. He brings out the greatness of Lewis' mind and character without hiding his flaws or failing to point out what he thinks are some of his half-baked or somewhat parochial ideas. The thorough research that has evidently gone into writing this book is skillfully crafted into a fascinating narrative; very enjoyable reading. Jacobs convincingly debunks the more bizarre speculations of A. N. Wilson's unfriendly biography (particularly those surrounding his debate with Elizabeth Anscombe--see also Victor Reppert's essay in ch. 21 of Bassham and Walls' book, "The Chronicles of Narnia and Philosophy" for more on this.) and fills in many gaps that other biographers have left. If you only have time to read one story of Lewis' life this is a good one. I highly recommend it. But you should make time to read two. Jack: A Life of C. S. Lewis, by George Sayer, is written from the perspective of a personal friend is a good companion to this one. You'll find some good stories in there that Jacobs leaves out. Sayer gives a better picture of Lewis' relationship with Joy Davidman, for example. Those who fault Jacobs for trying too hard to psychoanalyze Lewis have a good point. But his tone is speculative in these parts, not conclusive, cautioning readers to draw their own conclusions rather than put too much weight on his. One thing Jacobs helps to do is balance the view that many have of Lewis as a rationalist with his more passionate side. Lewis highly valued reason and logic in making sense of his beliefs and his "mere Christianity" but passion and imagination also seem to have played an important and necessary part in realizing those beliefs for his own life and in living them out.