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ePub The Autobiography of Alice B. Toklas (Modern Library) download

by Gertrude Stein

ePub The Autobiography of Alice B. Toklas (Modern Library) download
Author:
Gertrude Stein
ISBN13:
978-0679600817
ISBN:
0679600817
Language:
Publisher:
Modern Library; 1St Edition edition (September 7, 1993)
Category:
Subcategory:
History & Criticism
ePub file:
1640 kb
Fb2 file:
1118 kb
Other formats:
azw mbr doc docx
Rating:
4.6
Votes:
885

The Autobiography of Alice B. Toklas is a 1933 book by Gertrude Stein, written in the guise of an autobiography authored by Alice B. Toklas, her life partner

The Autobiography of Alice B. Toklas, her life partner. Alice B. Toklas, as narrator of the work, says she was born into an affluent family in San Francisco.

The Diary of Samuel Pepys (Modern Library Classics) by. .This work written by Gertrude Stein reminds the reader that her book is written raw - in her own very voice and in her own style.

using as a sounding board her companion Miss Toklas, who had been with her for twenty-five years.

Gertrude Stein was just seeing through the press Three Lives which she was having privately printed, and she was deep in The Making of Americans, her thousand page book. Picasso had just finished his portrait of her which nobody at that time liked except the painter and the painted and which is now so famous, and he had just begun his strange complicated picture of three women, Matisse had just finished his Bonheur de Vivre, his first big composition which gave him the name of fauve or a zoo. It was the moment Max Jacob has since called the heroic age of cubism.

Selected by the Modern Library as one of the 100 best nonfiction books of all time'I always wanted to be historical,' Gertrude . In 1932, Stein began writing the 'autobiography' of her longtime friend and companion, Alice B. Toklas.

Selected by the Modern Library as one of the 100 best nonfiction books of all time'I always wanted to be historical,' Gertrude Stein once quipped. The book, an immediate bestseller, guaranteed them both a place in history.

When Stein and Toklas met, the connection between them was immediate, and Toklas soon moved in and became . It was only with the publication in 1933 of The Autobiography of Alice B. Toklas that Stein reached a wider audience, and she and Toklas became literary celebrities.

When Stein and Toklas met, the connection between them was immediate, and Toklas soon moved in and became Stein’s partner. The two presided over one of the most famous salons in Paris, and their home became a gathering place for avant-garde writers and artists. Selected manuscripts, letters, photographs, printed materials, personal papers, and art and objects which document the life and work of Gertrude Stein and Alice B. Toklas, principally up until 1946, the year of Stein’s death.

However, it attracted criticism, especially from those who appeared in the book and didn't like the way they were depicted.

Read The Autobiography of Alice B. Toklas, by Gertrude Stein online on Bookmate – The Autobiography of Alice B. Toklas was written in 1933 by Gertrude Stein in the guise of an autobiography authore. However, it attracted criticism, especially from those who appeared in the book and didn't like the way they were depicted.

Gertrude Stein, Alice Toklas, and Albert Barnes: Looking like a Jew in the Autobiography of Alice B. Toklas By. Toklas By Feinstein, Amy Shofar, Vol. 25, No. 3, Spring 2007. Telling Lies in Modern American Autobiography By Timothy Dow Adams University of North Carolina Press, 1990. Librarian's tip: Chap. 2 "She Will Be Me When This You See".

Selected by the Modern Library as one of the 100 best nonfiction books of all time 'I always wanted to be historical,' .

Gertrude Stein was just seeing through the press Three Lives which she was having privately printed, and she was deep in.That was how much I knew about Gertrude Stein prior to reading The Autobiography of Alice B.

Gertrude Stein was just seeing through the press Three Lives which she was having privately printed, and she was deep in The Making of Americans, her thousand page book.

Gertrude Stein and Alice B. Toklas lived in Paris (they met in Paris in 1908), France prior to and during the Nazi occupation of France. Published in 1932 you read the thoughts of some of the most remarkable artists and writers of the 20th Century-informally, conversationally, while dining at Alice and Gertrude's home.

Stein's most famous work; one of the richest and most irreverent biographies ever written.From the Trade Paperback edition.
  • Anyone who has been asked that popular question,"If you could have dinner with anyone throughout history, who would you choose?" should read this book. Gertrude Stein and Alice B. Toklas lived in Paris (they met in Paris in 1908), France prior to and during the Nazi occupation of France. Published in 1932 you read the thoughts of some of the most remarkable artists and writers of the 20th Century-informally, conversationally, while dining at Alice and Gertrude's home. My favorite dinner party guidance she gives when you have lots of artists dining-is to make sure each artist is facing a wall hanging one of their own works of art. She found it diminished argument at the table. this book should be required reading for everyone in the arts. These artists were living La Vie Boheme, in Paris when the world was changing!

  • For anyone interested in Paris during the 20s this is a good book to read. The conceit of Stein writing Alice's autobiography creates some disorienting moments as well as some moments of amusement. As in Sylvia Beach's book Shakespeare and Company this book reveals the amazing number of writers and artists who were in Paris at the time. An interesting sideline is Stein and Toklas' work with the French wounded during the war. Edith Wharton is another writer whose wartime contributions are not commonly known. Any writer trying to get published will commiserate with Stein's efforts to get her own works out to the public. While Stein's writing can be difficult to read this book is not. Its lack of commas and sparsity of capital letters soon is hardly noticed. Finally Stein's wit can often catch the reader off guard in a delightful way.

  • I wonder what Alice B. Toklas would have written about herself had she done this autobiography. Gertrude Stein clearly knows that Toklas's life revolved around Stein's and, unashamedly, tells Alice's story from that perspective. Love comes through every pore of this book, however, as Stein, in Toklas's voice, describes the life these two women shared.

  • What fascinating lives they lived, what wonderful friends they had, what is sweet and tender relationship mixed with beautiful paintings, fascinating conversations, and of course that beat up old Ford and adorable Basket. A wonderful insight into what it was like to live in artists life in prewar Paris

  • Thoroughly enjoying this book. A great insight into the Arts of her time and the way they lived .It is a book I have wanted to read since seeing The Stein Art collection in San Francisco a couple of years ago .Now I want to read one of Gertrude Stein's books.

  • This is an odd little book but an enjoyable one. The Autobiography of Alice B. Toklas was actually written by, and focuses on, Gertrude Stein. She presents herself as a rather enigmatic figure. She is the intimate friend of a number of first-rate artists and writers, and she maintains a legendary Paris salon. She identifies herself as a genius - actually, one of a group of three geniuses, the other two being Pablo Picasso and Alfred North Whitehead - but she doesn't feel compelled to justify the characterization. The narrative is essentially a chronology of a series of dinners, parties, and other outings with the names of the people who came. A very dry wit is occasionally seen, as when Picasso and cubist painter Georges Braque go to see an art dealer wearing their "newest and roughest clothes." The tone of the narrative is relaxed and friendly and it seems that Alice and Gertrude Stein had fun, if nothing else.

  • A wonderful read, not necessarily for the narrative, but for the clear depictions of all those artists and streets and dinners she describes, the things they said and the looks on their faces. What a resource for old Paris, and the people that frequented her salon. A trip to The Barnes would be nice.

  • This work written by Gertrude Stein reminds the reader that her book is written raw -- in her own very voice and in her own style...not an editor's style, not an East Coast style, not a New Yorker's style not in any style but her own. Pretty and polished words are great in an essay, but when it comes to a novel or a memoir such as this, prose must be written truly in the voice and in the eyes of the character. Pretty or not. Polished or not. I'm proud that she reminds us to write true -- even to this day!