mostraligabue
» » The Open Door: When Writers First Learned to Read

ePub The Open Door: When Writers First Learned to Read download

by Steven Gilbar

ePub The Open Door: When Writers First Learned to Read download
Author:
Steven Gilbar
ISBN13:
978-0879239213
ISBN:
0879239212
Language:
Publisher:
David R Godine; 1st edition (June 1, 1989)
Category:
Subcategory:
History & Criticism
ePub file:
1310 kb
Fb2 file:
1176 kb
Other formats:
doc azw lrf mbr
Rating:
4.5
Votes:
450

who had to love reading, learned to read. May 19, 2010 David R. Godine rated it it was amazing. Shelves: words-and-humor. The Open Door is a reader's delight, a book to be savored, to browse through time and again. It has an endearingly personal tone, as if the reader had been invited to sit down for a short visit with each of the writers.

Godine in association with the Center for the Book in the Library of Congress.

Other prose: from c 1900 -, Literature - Classics, Criticism, Literary Criticism, Books & Reading, General, Nonfiction, General, Books and reading, Authors, American, Authors, English. Godine in association with the Center for the Book in the Library of Congress. inlibrary; printdisabled; ; china.

Published in conjunction with the Center for the Book at the Library of Congress to celebrate the Year of the Young Reader. Excerpts of one to three pages from the work of 29 writers, either autobiographical or nearly so. Includes photographs and brief biographical notes.

How did you learn to read? By Thriftbooks. com User, February 26, 2005. It was first published in 1989. The preface is by Barbara Bush who was the Honorary Chairperson of The Year of the Young Reader,a national campaign initiated by the Library of Congress to encourage young people to love books and reading.

When Writers First Learned to Read. Published June 1, 1989 by David R Godine.

com's Steven Gilbar Page and shop for all Steven Gilbar books. The Open Door: When Writers First Learned to Read. Check out pictures, bibliography, and biography of Steven Gilbar.

My experiences were like many of those writers whose recollections were gathered in my earlier anthology, The Open Door: When Writers First Learned to Read.

Reading in Bed: Personal Essays on the Glories of Reading. My experiences were like many of those writers whose recollections were gathered in my earlier anthology, The Open Door: When Writers First Learned to Read. Over the years I have dallied with television and movies, of course, but, to me, there is a rapture in delivering oneself into the hands of a good writer that other media simply cannot duplicate. a pleasure to be found only between the covers. I wish to thank Dean Stewart and Stephen Weiner for steering me to unsuspected sources and for their support.

Learn how to describe, build the plot, build a character Just by cramming the story on the pages.

Learn how to describe, build the plot, build a character. Recognize patterns, study the tone of voice and pace. Steal and make it your own. Usually, when I’m reading a book in a genre similar to what I’m writing at the moment, I feel extra inspired. Especially when I read just before I start writing. Write a ‘Crammy’ First Draft. Write with the door closed, rewrite with the door open. Just by cramming the story on the pages. Without judgment, with the door closed, only writing for himself. These goals are ambitious, and for me not manageable. I’m no full-time writer. But I do love his habitual and structural sense.

Your use of the site and services is subject to these policies and terms. Results from Google Books.

"Slowly my eyes rode across the lines of print, and the New World smiled. . . The door opened, and without hesitation I walked through." - M. F. K. FisherTwenty-nine of history and literature's most interesting & celebrated writers recall their discovery of books and reading: Benjamin Franklin, William Cobbet, Charles Dickens, Fredrick Douglas, Abraham Cahan, Rudyard Kipling, W.B. Yeats, H.G. Wells, Gertrude Stein, Winston Churchill, Sherwood Anderson, Upton Sinclair, H.L. Mencken, A.A. Milne, Will Durant, E.E. Cummings, Jean Rhys, C.S. Lewis, John Steinbeck, Isaac Bashevis Singer, Richard Wright, M.F.K. Fisher, Eudora Welty, Dylan Thomas, Harper Lee, Paule Marshall, Richard Rodriguez, Stephen King, Annie Dillard.
  • Steven Gilbar has added splendidly to the literature of books about books. The great joy in reading these selections is knowing that we are privvy to deep experiences of reading, from Benjamin Franklin to today: this is not just a collection of essays put together for an instant book as are many when-I-learned-to-read books. Here, you have individuality of style and depth of meaning. Mr. Gilbar's brief introductions are also enjoyable. My only criticism: the book could be at least three times its size.

  • The Open Door

    Selected by Steven Gilbar

    Book Review

    By Richard E. Noble

    I have yet to meet a writer who wasn't a reader. This little book of selected essays will appeal to any writer. Every writer has a story of that first book that caught their imagination and opened the door of "literature" into their lives.

    The first book that I completed, cover to cover, was "Treasure Island" by Robert Louis Stevenson. "Treasure Island" introduced me to the world of reading but the notion that I, myself, could become a writer came much later.

    A freshman teacher in college required a poem and then a short story and then an essay and so on. In researching how to write a poem I discovered Ralph Waldo Emerson and Ralph convinced me that I could become a poet. Writing poetry became a mania. Then I discovered philosophy and I was off composing my personal solutions for curing the world.

    Most of my answers to the problems facing the world were not all that sophisticated. The hungry should be feed; the poor should be given jobs; and soy beans could save us all.

    It is fun to read the remembrances of famous writers and learn of their first inspirations. I was familiar with most of the authors selected for this book but there were several I had never heard of ... William Cobbett, Abraham Cahan, A.A. Milne, Jean Rhys and a few others. The old familiar were as usual "inspiring." Folks like Winston Churchill, Frederick Douglass, Rudyard Kipling, Will Durant and many more.

    The stories are brief, little tidbits that can be read one at a time - a nice bed table book. I don't remember anyone writing anything racy or embarrassing, so, I suppose, this would also be a good volume for the younger crowd - certainly a seventh or eighth grader could handle this - maybe even a precocious fifth or sixth grader. This is a nice book, very easy reading. I see no reason not to buy this one - fun for all ages and inspirational for those few "special" people who are attracted to words and their impact on a written page.

    Richard Edward Noble - The Hobo Philosopher - Author of:

    "A Summer with Charlie" Salisbury Beach, Lawrence YMCA

  • I am amazed that I am the first to submit a review on this fascinating little book.It was first published in 1989.The
    preface is by Barbara Bush who was the Honorary Chairperson of The Year of the Young Reader,a national campaign initiated by the Library of Congress to encourage young people to love books and reading.
    Here we read about 29 of history and literatures' most interesting and celebrated writers recalling their discovery of books and reading.Most of these writers' experiences are in their own words and from their own works.
    Most people would probably answer my title question with a simple,"In School".What is so surprising is that most of these writers could already read before they ever went to school.Not only that,they had cultivated their love of reading on their own and not in school.
    H.G.Wells was reading Wood's "Natural History" at 7 or 8.He was doing this on his own.In fact he had minimal encouragement; "Both my parents were doubtful of the healthiness of reading,and did their best to discourage this pouring over books."
    Harper Lee who won a Pulitzer Prize for "To Kill a Mockingbird". When her first grade teacher asked if she knew the letters of the alphabet she had written on the blackboard;she found that not only did she know them but could already read "My First Reader" as well as quotations from "The Mobile Register";and was quite literate.The teacher looked at her with distaste and told her to "tell my father not to teach me any more,it would interfere with my reading."After telling her teacher that her father didn't teach her,she learned on her own.The teacher thought she was lying and said."Let's not let our imaninations run away with us,my dear,"she said."Now you tell your father not to teach you any more. It's best to begin reading with a fresh mind. You tell him I'll take over from here and try to undo the damage--" "Your father does not know how to teach.You can have your seat now."
    After reading this book,it's worth taking a little time and thinking about how you learned to read and more importantly what it was that created your love of reading.I am sure your own experiences were similar to those of the great writers covered in this book.

  • This is an excellent compilation of brief essays by writers who discover reading at any early age. What profound experiences they all have as they enter the "Open Door" - which changed their lives forever. Very thought provoking.