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by J. Dolan

ePub Poetic Occasion from Milton to Wordsworth (Early Modern Literature in History) download
Author:
J. Dolan
ISBN13:
978-0333733585
ISBN:
0333733584
Language:
Publisher:
Palgrave Macmillan; 2000 edition (October 28, 1999)
Category:
Subcategory:
History & Criticism
ePub file:
1671 kb
Fb2 file:
1901 kb
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Rating:
4.8
Votes:
514

Start by marking Poetic Occasion from Milton to Wordsworth (Early Modern Literature in History) as. .

Start by marking Poetic Occasion from Milton to Wordsworth (Early Modern Literature in History) as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read. This book takes a new approach to the evolution of the modern English Lyric, emphasizing the way in which several generations of poets, reacting to post-Reformation readers' dislike for invented poetic narratives, competed for the right to commemorate important public occasions and slowly expanded the range for acceptable occasion.

Part of the Early Modern Literature in History book series (EMLH) . John Dolan takes a new approach to the evolution of the modern English lyric, emphasising the way in which several generations of poets, reacting to post-Reformation readers' dislike for invented poetic narratives, competed for the right to commemorate important public occasions and slowly expanded the range of acceptable occasion. This book demonstrates that many fundamental features of a typical modern lyric actually evolved as responses to the limitations of occasional poetry. Elegie lyric poetics poetry reformation Wordsworth.

Poetic Occasion from Milton to Wordsworth. Part of the Early Modern Literature in History book series (EMLH). Cite this chapter as: Dolan J. (2000) Occasional Poetics in the Early Modern Lyric. Poetic Occasion from Milton to Wordsworth pp 1-17 Cite as. Occasional Poetics in the Early Modern Lyric. Authors and affiliations. Occasional poetics as a factor in the evolution of the modern English lyric has been relatively little studied. In: Poetic Occasion from Milton to Wordsworth. Early Modern Literature in History. Palgrave Macmillan, London. 1057/9780230286474 1.

Early Modern Literature in History. Poetic Occasion from Milton to Wordsworth. JOHN DOLAN is Senior Lecturer in English at the University of Otago, Dunedin, New Zealand (1993 to date). From 1985 to 1992 he was lecturer in the Rhetoric Department of the University of California at Berkeley. He has published scholarly work on eighteenth-century poetry and prose, and on twentieth-century poetry, especially the work of Wallace Stevens, as well as two books of poetry.

Series: Early Modern Literature in History. Other readers will always be interested in your opinion of the books you've read. Whether you've loved the book or not, if you give your honest and detailed thoughts then people will find new books that are right for them. File: PDF, 1. 6 MB. Читать онлайн.

Those particularly relevant to Early Modern History typically include .

Those particularly relevant to Early Modern History typically include: The Dawn of the Global World, 1450-1800: Ideas, Objects, Connections. These examples will come mainly from the literature on early modern Europe, which has had an influential role in the tradition of microhistory, but we may also consider examples from early American, and modern European history depending on student interests. Among the questions we will consider, we will pay particular attention to the issue of sources and their potential in the hands of imaginative historians as well as how microhistories relate to alternative analytical and narrative techniques.

Book won prize from the Society for the Study of Early Modern Women. 15. Mark Thornton Burnett, Constructing Monsters in Shakespearean Theatre and Culture (2002) 16. Sasha Roberts, Reading Shakespeare’s Poems in Early Modern England (2002)

Book won prize from the Society for the Study of Early Modern Women. Sasha Roberts, Reading Shakespeare’s Poems in Early Modern England (2002). 17. Sarah M. Dunnigan, Eros and Poetry at the Courts of Mary Queen of Scots and James VI (2002). 18. Elizabeth Heale, Chronicles of the Self.

Subjects: Literature, Renaissance and Early Modern Literature, British History . Achinstein, Sharon, Milton and the Revolutionary Reader, Princeton University Press, 1994.

Subjects: Literature, Renaissance and Early Modern Literature, British History: General Interest, British History after 1450, History. Series: The New Cambridge History of English Literature. This 2003 book is a full-scale history of early modern English literature, offering perspectives on English literature produced in Britain between the Reformation and the Restoration. While providing the general coverage and specific information expected of a major history, its twenty-six chapters address recent methodological and interpretive developments in English literary studies.

John Dolan takes a new approach to the evolution of the modern English lyric, emphasising the way in which several generations of poets, reacting to post-Reformation readers' dislike for invented poetic narratives, competed for the right to commemorate important public occasions and slowly expanded the range of acceptable occasion. This book demonstrates that many fundamental features of a typical modern lyric actually evolved as responses to the limitations of occasional poetry.
  • John Dolan describes the evolution of English poetry as follows. In John Milton's time, English culture was characterized by a distrust of "invention" or "fiction" in poetry; narrow-minded readers and critics insisted that every poem must be grounded in a real event, i.e. "based on a true story," and that this event must be sufficiently "serious" to merit poetic description. Aside from royal marriages and wartime victories, the only event that could meet the criteria had to be a death. Consequently, poets made their careers by cynically memorializing various deceased public officials, nobles, schoolmasters, and anyone else whose family might be wealthy enough to finance a "memorial volume." To deal with the scarcity of such occasions (relative to the growing number of poets) and the limited opportunities that they offered, poets in the 18th century started describing "mental occasions," expressing private grief over increasingly obscure and unverifiable calamities. The demand for "truth" in poetry then transmuted into a demand for "authenticity," so that poets came to be evaluated based primarily on their "ethos," or their overall aesthetic image.

    The book offers a lot of food for thought even if you don't buy its conclusions. The first couple of chapters describe a truly bizarre world in which careerist, college-educated 17th-century poets viciously competed for the chance to contribute blatantly cynical verse to memorial volumes for people whom they barely knew. This includes Milton himself; Dolan provocatively juxtaposes his private expressions of ambition against his contribution to a memorial volume in honour of a deceased classmate. His discourse on "Fame" in the poem takes on a rather cynical meaning in light of his own thirst for fame.

    The next chapter discusses John Dryden, whose career started with a similar commemorative poem. Where Milton still manages enough poetic gravitas to sound "sincere," Dryden's poem is hilariously, cheerfully cynical. I am surprised that Lord Hastings' family didn't have him tarred and feathered for what looks like sneering mockery of their dead relative. In fact, a lot of the verse cited in this book is just plain bad, written in clunky couplets with awkward rhymes. Indirectly, this also supports Dolan's argument -- if these poems weren't a cheap cash grab, I don't know what is.

    The rest of the book charts the transition from "truth-based" to "ethos-based" poetry. Dolan identifies several poets (Thomas Gray,Edward Young, and finally William Wordsworth) who were instrumental in this shift. This exposition is also very interesting, purely for the factual content. No one reads Gray these days, but he is revealed to have been a strong poet -- the line "and leaves the world to darkness and to me" is elegant and easily appeals to a modern sensibility (which again may indirectly support the idea that the spirit of occasional poetics never really went away).

    My only reservation about the argument is that the concept of "mental occasion" is extremely broad, and anything could be arbitrarily placed into this category. Dolan cites "narrative obscurity in using apparent code names and frightened-sounding omissions," such as "The town of D---" (168), as a characteristic of "ethos-based" poems. But this device isn't exclusive to English literature; you can also find it e.g. in Pushkin, or in 20th century Japanese novelists, who did not really have to worry about "anti-invention," and were not judged solely based on their ethos. Likewise, Continental poetry also used long descriptive titles referencing a real-life "occasion" for a poem, similar to "Written...upon seeing Vandyke's picture" (103) or Wordsworth's "Suggested by a picture of Peele Castle in a storm" (104). But I don't think this always necessarily has the intent of "legitimizing" the poem or "apologizing" for its creation; rather, this is a technical device enabling the poet to contrast and relate a small, banal real-life event to a wider-reaching philosophical point or emotional conclusion.

    Still, when you actually read some of these poems, you have to wonder. One cited poem has the title "To the Rev. Dr. F. Turner, Bishop of Ely, who had advised a translation of Prudentius" (108), and is completely devoid of content; the entire text consists of politely vacuous and flattering phrases, and ends without the least hint at any actual "translation." Dolan's wry commentary is quite amusing: "The levels of apology are complex here; first of all, the poet in no way provoked the creation of the poem, but rather was requested to make it...second, the literary task was...merely a translation, and thus not a true invention; and finally, the request is one which...gave the poor tempted poet a great deal of worry before he forced himself to favour the demands of friendship over the risks of invention." Here, Dolan is describing how poems in the early 18th century referenced earlier poems to lend themselves greater "legitimacy." One can't help but think that this is why Hollywood only produces sequels and remakes these days.

    Later on, Dolan comments an autobiographical paragraph by Boswell: "For thousands of aspiring geniuses like Boswell, ethos, and not production of literary work, defines the literary man...When belief in the poet's ethos has been secured, any poems backed by that ethos are assured of success. Belief in the text precedes the reading of it; belief in the text, by 1750, is a matter of ethos." (184) You read this, and you think: this is exactly what happens in popular music, especially in subcultures that place more value on "artistry" and are thus closer in spirit to poetry. This is exactly why every trendy indie rock band is accompanied, not only by "hype," but by a large amount of interpretive analysis of dubious quality. You know exactly what you're supposed to read into the album before you buy it!

    Alienating Dolan was the dumbest thing that academia ever did. He might have written another dozen monographs just as readable and insightful as this one. I personally prefer this book to his fiction or publicism. It maintains impeccable academic decorum, but completely overturns conventional wisdom about its subject matter.

  • On one level, this essential and tragic study of English poetry offers a totally original and convincing argument as to how we arrived at the poetics we inherited today. But what is most tragic, and frustrating, is the subtext to Dolan's book: that English poetry didn't have to be the constricted, narrow, and ultimately abstruse genre that it has become. Why do we not read poetry anymore? The answer: Because John Milton wanted to become famous. Milton emerges as the anti-Christ in the devolution of English poetry, with Wordsworth as his Damien come to destroy once and for all the great possibilities in a genre that was once meant to be widely read and enjoyed, instead of narrowly studied and forcibly swallowed, as it is today. The same could be said of modern American academia and academic writing, which Dolan subtly subverts by writing an eminently intelligent book that is at the same time readable, funny, and engaging, instead of merely a latticework of footnotes and interdepartmental backscratching, as 99 percent of his rivals' books tend to be. Lastly, taking this book's thesis as to how English poetry isolated itself and fell back on the poetics of least resistance, this book offers a view into how modern literature, which is becoming increasingly constricted, dull and diminished through the crushing influence of creative writing programs, is following a similar pattern as that which destroyed prose's forebear, poetry. In other words, Dolan's book is both a history of the past and of the present... and a call to exhume Milton's body for ceremonial desecration. If only more American academic books were like this, we might be a little less dependent on those impressively cheeky French lightweights who dare to express unqualified opinions. Dolan's forceful, engaging and emotional prose, which is such a welcome departure from his rivals, should serve as a lesson for all American intellectuals.