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by Stephen Sartarelli,Andrea Camilleri

ePub UC Hunting Season--CANCELED: A Novel download
Author:
Stephen Sartarelli,Andrea Camilleri
ISBN13:
978-0143121503
ISBN:
0143121502
Language:
Publisher:
Penguin Books (November 7, 2014)
Category:
Subcategory:
Literary
ePub file:
1759 kb
Fb2 file:
1706 kb
Other formats:
lrf azw doc lit
Rating:
4.4
Votes:
571

Stephen Sartarelli lives in upstate New York. Andrea Camilleri's Montalbano mystery series, bestsellers in Italy and Germany, has been adapted for Italian television and translated into German, French, Spanish, Portuguese, Greek, Japanese, Dutch, and Swedish.

Stephen Sartarelli lives in upstate New York.

Andrea Camilleri, a bestseller in Italy and Germany, is the author of the popular Inspector Montalbano mystery series as well as historical novels that take place in nineteenth-century Sicily. His thirteenth Montalbano novel, The Potter’s Field, won the Crime Writers’ Association International Dagger Award and was longlisted for the IMPAC Dublin Literary Award. Stephen Sartarelli is an award-winning translator and the author of three books of poetry. Published by the Penguin.

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Be assured that the ever faithful Stephen Sartarelli also translated this novel and that, as one would expect, Santarelli provides two pages of notes to explain the Sicilian-insider references.

Does that seem right to you? Doesn’t it cry out to God for vengeance that this child of sin is going to enjoy the vineyard of Le Zubbie? And that whore and her cuckolded pimp of a husband are going. to live it up after killing poor Don Filippo?. Killing him? But the inspector said the marchese died after slipping and falling into the gorge. Yes, but why did he slip?. How should I know? He lost his footing. No, sir. The pharmacist was like an open book on this point

In 1978 Camilleri wrote his first novel Il Corso Delle Cose ("The Way Things Go") .

In 1978 Camilleri wrote his first novel Il Corso Delle Cose ("The Way Things Go"). This was followed by Un Filo di Fumo ("A Thread of Smoke") in 1980. A new book, La Stagione della Caccia ("The Hunting Season") turned out to be a best-seller. In 1994 Camilleri published the first in a long series of novels: La forma dell'Acqua (The Shape of Water) featured the character of Inspector Montalbano, a fractious Sicilian detective in the police force of Vigàta, an imaginary Sicilian town. In 2012, Camilleri's The Potter's Field (translated by Stephen Sartarelli) was announced as the winner of the 2012 Crime Writers' Association International Dagger.

From internationally bestselling author Andrea Camilleri comes a brilliant, bawdy comedy that will surprise even the most die-hard Montalbano fans. In 1880s Vigàta, a stranger comes to town to open a pharmacy. Fofò turns out to be the son of a man made legendary for having a magic garden stocked with plants, fruits, and vegetables that could cure any ailmenta man who was found murdered years ago. Fofò escaped but has now reappeared looking to make his fortune and soon finds himself mixed up in the dealings of a philandering local marchese set on producing an heir.

by Andrea Camilleri (Author), Stephen Sartarelli (Translator). The novels of Andrea Camilleri breathe out the sense of place, the sense of humor, and the sense of despair that fills the air of Sicily. His thirteenth Montalbano novel, The Potter's Field, won the Crime Writers' Association International Dagger Award and was longlisted for the International Dublin Literary Award.

by Andrea Camilleri Author · Stephen Sartarelli Translator. From internationally bestselling author Andrea Camilleri comes a brilliant, bawdy comedy that will surprise even the most die-hard Montalbano fans

by Andrea Camilleri Author · Stephen Sartarelli Translator. From internationally bestselling author Andrea Camilleri comes a brilliant, bawdy comedy that will surprise even the most die-hard Montalbano fans. Fofò turns out to be the son of a man made legendary for having a magic garden stocked with plants, fruits, and vegetables that could cure any ailment-a man who was found murdered years ago.

Written by Andrea Camilleri, Audiobook narrated by Grover Gardner. The Other End of the Line. Inspector Montalbano, Book 24. By: Andrea Camilleri, Stephen Sartarelli - translator. Narrated by: Grover Gardner

Written by Andrea Camilleri, Audiobook narrated by Grover Gardner. Narrated by: Grover Gardner. Length: 7 hrs and 13 mins.

  • Orininally published in l992, before the Montalbano novels appeared, The Hunting Season is an incredibly imaginative little novel with a wacky bent that prefigures the wackiness of Camilleri’s detective series.

    The setting is nineteenth-century Vigàta, an imaginary town in Sicily. The plot is peopled with nobles, peasants, priests, lascivious women, virtuous women, a doctor, a pharmacist, and police Inspector Portera.

    The Inspector doesn't play much of a role, except to grow mildly suspicious when anyone dies under peculiar circumstances. And people do die oddly, quite regularly. The heroine moves through the dressed in black.

    There's lots of licentious behavior to titillate and amuse the reader.

    I didn't realize how much I liked the story until the end, when I saw that I'd been treated to a bizarre love story and a wildly clever plot.

    The Hunting Season should be of great interest to Camilleri fans.

  • As a fan of Camilleri's series of crime novels starring detective Montalbano, I was intrigued when an earlier novel was published. Hunting Season is staged in 19th century Vigata, Sicily, the fictitious locale for his more famous series, and actually is a murder mystery involving the town's nobility. Much of it is quite funny, but the humor often is rather bawdy, so you are warned. The translator, Stephen Sartorelli, provides the same stellar imparting of the mood the character piece that he does for the Montalbano series. It is an entertaining bagatelle for Camilleri fans.

  • "Hunting Season" is a small book by Italian author Andrea Camilleri, who is well-known for his Inspector Montalbano crime series set in current-day Sicily. "Hunting" seems to be a story that he wanted to write that is not part of the series. It's set in Sicily, but the Sicily of 1880. It is part mystery and part magical-realism. If you don't like magical-realism, don't pick up this book.

    The mystery in this book are the continuing deaths of members of the landed Peluso family. Grandfather, grandson, wife, husband, etc. are dying some-what suspicious deaths in the village of Vigata. But are the deaths murders? And if so, who's the murderer? A "stranger" has come to town and has opened up a pharmacy. But who is he and what is his previous connection with the town and the townspeople? Camilleri serves up the townsfolk as both illiterate and canny and those who can read and write have some advantages over those who can't. But everyone in the village is caught up with who is who and what have some people gained in material wealth over others.

    "Magic-realism" is a writing style which often helps an author explain things in a plot that are otherwise unexplainable to the reader. It's not my favorite style, but Andrea Camilleri - who explains in the afterword why he wrote the book - makes good sport of his plot and characters. It's a brief book but fun reading.

  • I knew that this book was not a Montalbano mystery but wanted to read a different work by Andrea Camilleri so I bought this book for my Kindle. Despite what other reviewers have said, I was not disappointed. The story is set in Vigata of the 1880s featuring a small town full of high strung, loud, superstitious, nosy Sicilians whose lives are rocked by a series of deaths. It is bawdy, funny and made me laugh out loud several times. I won't spoil the story for others but highly recommend this fun book to people who want a quick, enjoyable summer read set in Sicily of the past.

  • An early Andrea Camilleri story set in 1880s Vigata, Sicily (the once and future home of Inspector Salvo Montalbano). The wonderful storyteller Camilleri has fashioned a sly and bawdy tale of serial deaths decimating a Sicilian family of provincial nobles that affects the lives of everyone in the small town, in which a fading feudal system is still limping along. Love, lust and romantic longing frame the increasingly questionable family pruning that grinds on as the town folk watch agog. Hilarious story and satisfying ending.

    This is a witty confection that foreshadows the later coming of the great Montalbano and his modern Sicilian adventures and cohorts.

  • Camilleri is a master at descriptive language, storytelling and humor. I've read his entire Detective Montalban mystery series, and I love the characters that take shape in the hands of this powerful writer. I knew "Hunting Season" would not feature Detective Montalbano, and I was eager to see what kind of very different imaginative journey the author would take me on. Alas, the joy of the journey fizzled out for me when the book veered into the topic of bestiality. Who the heck wants disgusting images planted in their brain? Count me out!

  • Hunting Season is a combination of folkloric exaggeration and bawdiness with real Italian elements. A story of a noble family in a small Sicilian village, it largely revolves around a marchese and his efforts to get a son from his wife and then from his mistress. Meanwhile a stranger comes to town who sets up as a pharmacist. The marchese's son fiancee is a goat because the son is connected to the vegetable world (though not a vegetable himself). And the pharmacist begins to play more and more of a role. Ultimately the surprise reminds one of Kind Hearts and Coronets. This is a lighthearted fun read.

  • Occasionally confusing, but overall an enjoyable and sometimes funny early book by Camilleri. Vigata is in here, and an early but minor version of Inspectore Montalbano, but this is basically just a good old fashioned romp Italian style. There is some mild violence (a fistfight) and while there is a great deal of sex, it is only mentioned or inferred. You'll enjoy the twists and turns this book takes to get to it's somewhat happy ending.