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ePub A Pagan Place download

by Edna O'Brien

ePub A Pagan Place download
Author:
Edna O'Brien
ISBN13:
978-0915308590
ISBN:
0915308592
Language:
Publisher:
Graywolf Pr (September 1, 1984)
Category:
Subcategory:
Literary
ePub file:
1551 kb
Fb2 file:
1736 kb
Other formats:
docx txt doc mobi
Rating:
4.8
Votes:
190

Josephine Edna O'Brien was born in 1930 to Michael O'Brien and Lena Cleary at Tuamgraney .

Josephine Edna O'Brien was born in 1930 to Michael O'Brien and Lena Cleary at Tuamgraney, County Clare, Ireland, a place she would later describe as "fervid" and "enclosed". According to O'Brien, her mother was a strong, controlling woman who had emigrated temporarily to America, and worked for some time as a maid in Brooklyn, New York, for a well-off Irish-American family before returning to Ireland to raise her family. O'Brien's awards include a Kingsley Amis Award in 1962 (for The Country Girls), the Yorkshire Post Book Award in 1970 (for A Pagan Place), and the Los Angeles Times Book Prize in 1990 for Lantern Slides.

A Pagan Place was an album released in June 1984 by The Waterboys. It was the first Waterboys record with Karl Wallinger as part of the band and also includes Roddy Lorimer's first trumpet solo for the band on the track "A Pagan Place". 1 Production history.

Edna O’Brien A Pagan Place Table of Contents Epigraph Part One Part Two Part Three About the Author also by Edna . The free online library containing 450000+ books. Read books for free from anywhere and from any device.

The free online library containing 450000+ books.

A Pagan Place is Edna O'Brien's stunning novel about the uniquely wonderful, terrible, peculiar place she once called .

A Pagan Place is Edna O'Brien's stunning novel about the uniquely wonderful, terrible, peculiar place she once called home. She writers not only of a life there - of a child becoming a woman - but of the Irish experience out of which that life arises. Edna O'Brien has made of her memories something of both precision and depth, a book that, letting us see her as she was, jumps with an all-consuming curiosity from one lucidly narrated event to another, the scenes of disenchantment and bewilderment mingling with an assortment of surprises, traps, and ventures that are often, but not always, disastrous shocks.

A PAGAN PLACE is Edna O'Brien's true novel of Ireland. Edna O'Brien's is an Ireland of country charm and small town innocence. Here she returns to that uniquely wonderful, terrible, peculiar place she once called home and writes not only of a life there-of the child becoming a woman-but of the Irish experience out of which that life arises-perhaps more pointedly than in any of her other works. This is the Ireland of country villages and A PAGAN PLACE is Edna O'Brien's true novel of Ireland. It is an Ireland whose sons and daughters clasp tightly to an earnest and honest religious belief where confession is attended, parent's respected and hail Mary's repeated until the end of time. Edna O'Brien is the author of numerous books, including Night, Down by the River, House of Splendid Isolation, Time and Tide, Lantern Slides, and, most recently, Wild Decembers. Here she returns to that uniquely wonderful, terrible, peculiar place she once called home and writes not only of a life there – of the child becoming a woman – but of the Irish experience out of which that life arises – perhaps more pointedly than in any of her other works. This is the Ireland of country villages and barley fields, of druids in the woods, of unknown babies in the womb, of mischievous girls and Tans with guns.

In A Pagan Place, Edna O’Brien returns to Ireland, the uniquely wonderful, terrible, and peculiar place she once called home. After leaving to join a religious community in Belgium, a young woman remembers her childhood on the western coast of Ireland. She reflects on the rituals of rural life, the people she encountered, and the enchanting beauty of the landscape.

A Pagan Place is a 1970 novel by Irish writer Edna O'Brien. The book was first published on April 16, 1970 by Weidenfeld & Nicolson and follows a young girl in the 1930s and 1940s Style. A Pagan Place is narrated in second person in its entirely

Edna O’Brien (b. 1930), an award-winning Irish author of novels, plays, and short stories . Notable works also include August Is a Wicked Month (1965), A Pagan Place (1970), Lantern Slides (1990), and The Light of Evening (2006). O’Brien lives in London.

Edna O’Brien (b. 1930), an award-winning Irish author of novels, plays, and short stories, has been hailed as one of the greatest chroniclers of the female experience in the twentieth century. rience in the twentieth century. She is the 2011 recipient of the Frank O’Connor Prize, awarded for her short story collection Saints and Sinners.

Book by O'Brien, Edna
  • I love all things Irish culture related. Had not heard of this author before and am glad that I read a review of her in the New Republic on her new book 24 chairs. She is definitely worth reading, especially if you want to immerse yourself in Irish culture circa 1930's and later.

  • There is something wonderful about Irish women authors and I wonder if it started with Edna.... I'm sure not. If you adore beautiful writing, this book will not disappoint you. It will lift you up! and cause you to look for more.

  • Edna has lost none of her brilliance over the years. I felt the text could be set to music!

  • A stellar scriptural performance
    1940 in SW Ireland

  • Using an everyday conversational narrative style, Edna O’Brien delivers a devastating critique of Irish Catholic society. Her quiet understatement is more effective than a harsh rant. In her account, poverty diminishes humanity. Women, deaf people, coloured people and Protestants all suffer rank discrimination and abuse. A father savagely beats his innocent daughter who has been violated by a cleric. A perverse guilt-ridden view of sex distorts and destroys lives. The Catholic church exercises hegemonic oppressive control and so shares responsibility for this ‘pagan place’. If O’Brien’s characterisation is typical and true, what is the church’s response?

  • I don't understand the two negative reviews of this novel. The reviewers seemed not to have understood what they were reading. A Pagan Place is phenomenal, poetic, richly nuanced. It's written in the second person, but rather than this fact being intrusive in any way, it's inclusive. It brings you in. The paganism of the title comes evocatively to life in so many little details the whole book through. But the emergencies of gender and of sex in conservative religious Ireland bring a rigid punitive end to the innocent and natural love of nature and the earth itself. A Pagan Place gets at the core of religious, social, and political dichotomies in everyday Irish life. It's one of O'Brien's lesser known novels, but it's as beautifully and masterfully written as any of her others.

  • This book examines the female experience of being an artist, being Irish, and coming of age. Sound familiar? Edna O'Brien updates James Joyce's Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man. She is sensitive, connecting paganism, sexuality and death, quickly (within the first 15 pages of the book). The protagonist struggles with her Irish upbringing, which connects Christianity with purity and chastity. Unlike Stephen Dedalus, she cannot use religion as an ordering device which he can eventually and ultimately reject. Instead, this protagonist becomes immobalized by the struggle between the two and unable to transcend the very society that entraps her. Like Joyce, O'Brien uses stream of consciousness techinques, but without the utter sense of chaos and disillusionment. She is subtle and she allows other voices to speak in her novel. For example, "You tried to whistle. Only men should whistle (parent voice). The Blessed Virgin blushed when women whistled and likewise when women crossed their legs (voice from church). It intrigues you thinking of the Bledded Virgin having to blush so frequently (protagonist's voice). The bird that had the most lifelike whistle was the curlew (teacher's voice)." Edna O'Brien's voice is a multifarious voice which captures many of the voices that surround a child coming of age. This is a book about identity that will dazzle you with its writing and with its final outcomes. I not only read this book when I was studying in Ireland, but I now teach this book in an Irish Literature class in the United States. This is a must read.

  • I had to read this mess for an MFA class. Set aside that it is feminist crap, the book is written entirely in the second person --- if I hear one more 'you did such and such' I'll puke. It's a slog fest not worth the paper its written on. The lesson I learned? Most of what passes for "literary" is just mediocre writing by people who are friends with other mediocre writers, and consider making their work unintelligible a form of creativity. They call it "experimental".