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ePub The General in His Labyrinth download

by Edith Grossman,Gabriel Garcia Marquez

ePub The General in His Labyrinth download
Author:
Edith Grossman,Gabriel Garcia Marquez
ISBN13:
978-0140148596
ISBN:
0140148590
Language:
Publisher:
Penguin Books; Reprint edition (September 1, 1991)
Category:
Subcategory:
Literary
ePub file:
1432 kb
Fb2 file:
1896 kb
Other formats:
rtf lrf lit txt
Rating:
4.8
Votes:
962

The General in His Labyrinth (original Spanish title: El general en su laberinto) is a 1989 dictator novel by Colombian writer and Nobel laureate Gabriel García Márquez.

The General in His Labyrinth (original Spanish title: El general en su laberinto) is a 1989 dictator novel by Colombian writer and Nobel laureate Gabriel García Márquez. The book traces Bolívar's final journey from Bogotá to the Caribbean coastline of Colombia in his attempt to leave South America for exile in Europe.

Gabriel Garcia Marquez was born in Aracataca, Colombia, in 1927. who gave me the idea for writing this book. The general in his labyrinth. He studied at the University of Bogota and later worked as a reporter for the Colombian newspaper El Espectador and as a foreign correspondent in Rome, Paris, Barcelona, Caracas and New York.

El general en su laberinto The General in His Labyrinth, Gabriel García .

El general en su laberinto The General in His Labyrinth, Gabriel García Márquez The General in His Labyrinth (original Spanish title: El general en su laberinto) is a 1989 dictator novel by Colombian writer and Nobel laureate Gabriel García Márquez.

The novel relates the last days of Simón Bolívar as he leaves Bogotá for his final stop at Santa Marta. The book is populated by interesting secondary characters

The novel relates the last days of Simón Bolívar as he leaves Bogotá for his final stop at Santa Marta. The book is populated by interesting secondary characters. The cadence of the book flows along like the Magdalena River; it is inexorably leading to the tragic end in Santa Marta. In English or in Spanish, the book sings a melancholy but fascinating song.

Gabriel Garcia Marquez's most political novel is the tragic story of General Simon Bolivar, the man who tried to unite a continent. As he wanders in the labyrinth of his failing powers - and still-powerful memories - he defies his impending death until the last. Bolivar, known in six Latin American countries as the Liberator, is one of the most revered heroes of the western hemisphere; in Garcia Marquez's reimagining he is magnificently flawed as well. The novel follows Bolivar as he takes his final journey in 1830 down the Magdalena River toward the sea, revisiting the scenes of his former glory and lamenting his lost dream of an alliance of American nations.

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Both real history and Marquez' imagination let us enter the world of Simon Bolivar, Liberator of South America, in all his humanity - good and evil. Bolivar drove the Spanish out of South America, dealt with treachery from his own compatriots. Please provide me with your latest book news, views and details of Waterstones’ special offers.

A distinguished boo. arcía Márquez splendidly presents his image of Latin America and of a great man redux. A stunning portrait, convincing and poignant.

Gabriel García Márquez. El general en su laberinto . story explores the labyrinth of Bolívar's life through the narrative of his memories. Following the success of others of his works such as One Hundred Years of Solitude and Love in the Time of Cholera, García Márquez decided to write about the "Great Liberator" after reading an unfinished novel about Bolívar by his friend Álvaro Mutis.

The General in His Labyrinth. To evoke this extraordinary destiny, the García Márquez mixes fiction with history. Under his pen, the historic hero becomes a man in a Promethean duel with history and time. On the 8 May 1830, General Simón Bolívar, escorted by his retinue, leaves Bogotá after having relinquished power. He only has a few days to live. Just down the Magdalena River, El Libertador (‘the Liberator’) of South American relives his struggles, his triumphs, his excesses and his failures. The Autumn of the Patriarch. This book was written with a watchmaker’s precision.

Old and ill, General Simon Bolivar reexamines his life--reliving his campaigns, recalling his romances, and revealing himself as a lover, libertine, and fighter--during a seven-month voyage down the Magdalena River
  • I recently read the author's acclaimed work "Love in the Time of Cholera" and enjoyed it very much. It spurred me to seek out more work by Marquez, hence this and several others that I recently purchased. My second foray into Marquez was "One Hundred Years of Solitude". I was very disappointed in that novel and concerned that I'd perhaps already seen the best he had to offer. Luckily, I followed up with "Love and Other Demons", finding it to be well worthwhile the effort. While not up to the standards of that novel, I nevertheless enjoyed this work.

    Marquez's writing is certainly unique in its earthiness. He deals with such subjects as sex, bodily functions and graphic illness as if they are parts of everyday life ... because they are. It is refreshing.

    Marquez is also known as one of the leading practitioners of the literary device of "magical realism" in which events are introduced into the story which are quite fantastic (for example, a character being swept away into the sky as though taken to heaven, a rain event that lasts over four years followed by an absolute drought of ten years). This was a major device used in One Hundred Years of Solitude and perhaps contributed to my dissatisfaction with that work.

    This work, on the other hand, is virtually a non-fiction work, having as its subject the final days of Simon Bolivar, the Liberator of the Americas. The General, at a very unhealthy 46 years of age has withdrawn from political life and announced his pending exile to Europe as he begins his journey in Bogota, floats down the Magdalena River, spends some time in Cartagena fomenting intrigue before his journey (and life) ends in Soledad.

    Throughout the odyssey, we witness the deteriorating physical condition (apparently tuberculosis) of the General as we are treated to numerous flashbacks of his fascinating life and adventures. The General is depressed and emotionally volatile as he witnesses the collapse of his lifetime dream and goal, the independence and unification of northern South America into a global super power. Even as the General wastes away, he observes the almost pre-ordained collapse of the fragile union of states and the pending insurrections and civil wars breaking out within them. It is a mess and he is powerless to prevent the carnage, though his very nature leads him to make the attempt.

    The author's writing is indisputably beautiful and at times mesmerizing. Much like LitToC, this is a haunting and compelling story, filled with sadness and regret. It is an intriguing look into the mind of one of the most compelling and important figures in world history.

  • I have read this novel in the original Spanish and enjoyed it very much. I decided to re-read it in the English translation. I enjoyed this as well. Edith Grossman has captured Garcia Marquez style very well. The novel relates the last days of Simón Bolívar as he leaves Bogotá for his final stop at Santa Marta. The book is populated by interesting secondary characters. The cadence of the book flows along like the Magdalena River; it is inexorably leading to the tragic end in Santa Marta. In English or in Spanish, the book sings a melancholy but fascinating song.

  • This book is so good that I think I have read it three times now. Simon Bolivar is one of the most intriguing and amazing characters in human history, and Gabriel Garcia Marquez is the perfect writer to portray him. The only other book of this genre I have enjoyed as much is Mark Twain's Joan of Arc.

  • I am glad to have read several of Gabriel Gracia Marquez' books, given they are considered great works. I found them to be compelling (I never wanted to put the book down), and yet, I don't feel I am able to adequately appreciate his material; I think a better appreciation requires more knowledge of (or at least exposure to) his cultural context. There's something about his writing TONE that makes the reader want to be very sympathetic towards the characters. However, I never really felt I understood them.

  • The General in his Labyrinth is about power and the loss of power, about being challenged by the labyrinth of desire to pursue a dream versus the reality of it not happening. It is also about The General's love of country, love of his people and of women.

  • This is a re-read for me. .just,revisiting one of my favorite author s

  • What else would you expect from Garcia Márquez. Beautifully written with incredible detail, both historical and magical. I plan on making a journey to Mompox.

  • Good book.