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ePub At Play in Belfast: Children's Folklore and Identities in Northern Ireland (Series in Childhood Studies) download

by Donna Lanclos

ePub At Play in Belfast: Children's Folklore and Identities in Northern Ireland (Series in Childhood Studies) download
Author:
Donna Lanclos
ISBN13:
978-0813533216
ISBN:
081353321X
Language:
Publisher:
Rutgers University Press (May 15, 2003)
Category:
Subcategory:
Mythology & Folk Tales
ePub file:
1201 kb
Fb2 file:
1165 kb
Other formats:
mobi lrf lit mbr
Rating:
4.5
Votes:
769

Series: Rutgers Series in Childhood Studies.

Series: Rutgers Series in Childhood Studies. Paperback: 224 pages. ISBN-13: 978-0813533223. Product Dimensions: 6 x . x 9 inches. Back to top. Get to Know Us. Careers.

Donna M. Lanclos writes about children on the school playgrounds of wo. .Lanclos explores children's folklore, including skipping rhymes, clapping games, and "dirty" jokes, from five Belfast primary schools (two Protestant, two Catholic, and one mixed). She listens for what she can learn about gender, family, adult-child interactions, and Protestant/Catholic tensions. Lanclos frequently notes violent themes in the folklore and conversations that indicate children are aware of the reality in which they live.

For Lanclos, children's experiences stimulate discussions about culture and society. In her words, "Children's everyday lives are more than just preparation for their futures, but are life itself. Donna M. Lanclos writes about children on the school playgrounds of working-class Belfast, Northern Ireland, using their own words to show how they shape their social identities. Lanclos writes about children on the school playgrounds of working-class Belfast . The notion that children's voices and perspectives must be included in a work about childhood is central to the book. Lanclos writes about children on the school playgrounds of working-class Belfast, Northern Ireland, using their own words to show how they shape their.

At play in belfast: Children's folklore and identities in Northern Ireland. LS Connaway, DM Lanclos, EM Hood. The Library in the Life of the User, 173, 2015. Rutgers University Press, 2003. Re-imagining the users' experience: an ethnographic approach to web usability and space design.

Lanclos, Donna M. 2003. At play in Belfast, Children's folklore and identities in Northern Ireland. New Brunswick: Rutgers University Press. xiv + 209 pp. Hb: £4. 0. ISBN: 0 X. Pb: £1. 5. ISBN: 0 8. HELENA WULFF (a1).

Donna M. Lanclos, At play in Belfast: children's folklore and identities in Northern Ireland, Rutgers University Press . Lanclos, At play in Belfast: children's folklore and identities in Northern Ireland, Rutgers University Press, 2003, p. 165. ^ Colin Valley FC Honours. Heather Hamill, The hoods: crime and punishment in Belfast, Princeton University Press, 2010, pp. 25–27. The marginalization of children and childhood, it is proposed, has obscured our understanding of how cultural forms emerge and why they are sustained. New Brunswick, NJ: Rutgers University Press. Introduction In Urban Girls: Resisting Stereotypes, Creating Identities Small Wars: The Cultural Politics of Childhood. Two case studies, exploring North American children's beliefs about social contamination, illustrate these points.

At play in Belfast: children’s folklore and identities in Northern Ireland. Chapter 2, ‘Rudeness and defining the line between child and adult’. American Anthropologist. Friday 3 August – Lecture 5: Adolescence. This lecture explores debates within psychology and anthropology about the ‘universal’ status of adolescence. Is adolescence always a time of ‘storm and stress’, or is this a cultural construction of the West? How might teenagers experience their lives in other cultures?

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Donna M. Lanclos writes about children on the school playgrounds of working-class Belfast, Northern Ireland, using their own words to show how they shape their social identities. The notion that children's voices and perspectives must be included in a work about childhood is central to the book. Lanclos explores children's folklore, including skipping rhymes, clapping games, and "dirty" jokes, from five Belfast primary schools (two Protestant, two Catholic, and one mixed). She listens for what she can learn about gender, family, adult-child interactions, and Protestant/Catholic tensions. Lanclos frequently notes violent themes in the folklore and conversations that indicate children are aware of the reality in which they live. But at the same time, children resist being marginalized by adults who try to shield them from this reality.

For Lanclos, children's experiences stimulate discussions about culture and society. In her words, "Children's everyday lives are more than just preparation for their futures, but are life itself."

At Play in Belfast is a volume in the Rutgers Series in Childhood Studies, edited by Myra Bluebond-Langner.