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ePub Selected Cantos of Ezra Pound download

by Ezra Pound

ePub Selected Cantos of Ezra Pound download
Author:
Ezra Pound
ISBN13:
978-0811201605
ISBN:
0811201600
Language:
Publisher:
W W Norton & Co Inc (February 1, 1988)
Category:
Subcategory:
Poetry
ePub file:
1734 kb
Fb2 file:
1168 kb
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Rating:
4.1
Votes:
153

to lovers of Pound’s work, Poems and Translations could not be more welcome.

Among his fellow modernists, Ezra Pound inspired equal parts admiration and contempt

Among his fellow modernists, Ezra Pound inspired equal parts admiration and contempt. Eliot called him "il miglior fabbro" and dedicated "The Waste Land" to him after Pound had surgically stripped down the masterwork.

Ezra Pound, "Canto I" from The Cantos of Ezra Pound. Reprinted by permission of New Directions Publishing Corporation. Source: The Cantos of Ezra Pound (New Directions Publishing Corporation, 1993). More About this Poem.

Ezra Weston Loomis Pound was an American expatriate poet, critic and intellectual who was a major figure of the Modernist movement in early-to-mid 20th century poetry. Pound's The Cantos contains music and bears a title that could be translated as The Songs-although it never is. Pound's ear was tuned to the motz et sons of troubadour poetry where, as musicologist John Stevens has noted, Ezra Weston Loomis Pound was an American expatriate poet, critic and intellectual who was a major figure of the Modernist movement in early-to-mid 20th century poetry.

Ezra Weston Loomis Pound (30 October 1885 – 1 November 1972) was an expatriate American poet and critic, a major figure in the early modernist poetry movement, and a fascist sympathizer. His works include Ripostes (1912), Hugh Selwyn Mauberley (1920) and the unfinished 120-section epic, The Cantos (1917–1969).

Home Browse Books Book details, Selected Cantos of Ezra Pound. This selection from the Cantos was made by Ezra Pound himself in 1965. It is intended to indicate main elements in the long poem––his personal epic––with which he was engaged for more than fifty years. Selected Cantos of Ezra Pound. His choice includes, of course, a number of the Cantos most admired by critics and anthologists, such as Canto XIII ( Kung walked by the dynastic templ., Canto XLV ( With usura hath no man a house of good ston. and the passage from The Pisan Cantos (LXXXI) beginning What thou lovest well remains, the rest is dross, and so the book.

Ezra Pound’s colossal work of modernist poetry, The Cantos, runs to nearly 800 pages and took him over half his life to write – and even then, he never finished it. Is The Cantos a masterpiece of twentieth-century poetry or an artistic failure? Is it sheer self-indulgent verbiage or a. . Is The Cantos a masterpiece of twentieth-century poetry or an artistic failure? Is it sheer self-indulgent verbiage or an under-read and underappreciated epic for the modern world? We can hardly scratch the surface in this short introduction to Pound’s Cantos, but we’re going to address some of the key aspects of the poem and offer an analysis of its overall aims and features. Ezra Pound referred to The Cantos as, variously, ‘an.

The volume includes .

The volume includes works such as and "A Ballad of the Mulberry Road". The cause is AVARICE. Pound also declared in 1967, "The worst mistake I made was that stupid, suburban prejudice of anti-Semitism. com/articles/5012 title An.

This selection from the Cantos was made by Ezra Pound himself in 1965. It is intended to "indicate main elements" in the long poem - his personal epic - with which he was engaged for more than fifty years

This selection from the Cantos was made by Ezra Pound himself in 1965. It is intended to "indicate main elements" in the long poem - his personal epic - with which he was engaged for more than fifty years

Ezra Weston Loomis Pound (October 30, 1885 – November 1, 1972) was an American expatriate poet, critic and .

Ezra Weston Loomis Pound (October 30, 1885 – November 1, 1972) was an American expatriate poet, critic and intellectual who was a major figure of the Modernist movement in the first half of the 20th .These ostensible translations of ancient Eastern texts, Kenner argues, are actually experiments in English poetics and compelling elegies for a warring West.

to lovers of Pound’s work, Poems and Translations could not be more welcome.

Ezra Pound has been called "the inventor of modern poetry in English. The verse and criticism which he produced during the early years of the twentieth century very largely determined the directions of creative writing in our time; virtually every major poet in England and America today has acknowledged his help or influence. Pound's lyric genius, his superb technique, and his fresh insight into literary problems make him one of the small company of men who through the centuries have kept poetry alive-one of the great innovators. It is intended to "indicate main elements" in the long poem - his personal epic - with which he was engaged for more than fifty years

Excerpt's from Pound's long poem designate his own choice of the basic elements in his life's work
  • A much-lauded writer whose work is spiced with more than a touch of schizophrenia. Writing that does not deserve to be reproduced, but buried after burning.

  • The SELECTED CANTOS of Ezra Pound is the poet's own collection of those portions of his magnum opus that he thought the best and most representative of the work.

    I won't attempt here to review the Cantos in any real depth. Suffice it to say that in a work of 818 pages, written from youth through maturity and mental breakdown to senescence, with a wide variety of concerns from Chinese antiquity to kooky modern economics, the material within is quite heterogenous and inconsistent. In the complete work there are portions of total banality and clumsiness, and of course Pound's infamous anti-Semitism. But there are also moments of awesome and inspiring poetry, especially in the exotic Chinese poems and in the chronicle of individual experience in the Pisan cantos. I can't promise to anyone that they will like the Cantos--a reason why all of my reviews of its editions are three stars--but for me, I find some of Pound's own lines to explain my attitude towards the work, "What thou lovest well remains, the rest is dross". There's enough here to make me a very happy reader, in spite of all the faults.

    What does this SELECTED CANTOS volume offer? Well, for one, it's much more accessible than the complete edition. Instead of an intimidating hardbound 818 pages, we get a softcover of 119 pages. This is much more manageable for one who wants to discover some of the work before committing to buying the whole. The selection was made in 1966, when all but the final two poems were written. It is representative of the whole, as we do get the final cantos where Pound mourns his inability to write a "paradiso". TThe Fragment for the final Canto, which I think doggerel, is thankfully missing. The publisher added 200 more lines to the excepts of Cantos already selected here, as well as some fragments of Cantos which appeared in 1970.

    As the selection was made so late, after Pound had to show contrition for his anti-semitic demagogery of the 1930s, the selections here avoid that most uncomfortable and deplorable material. This works out very well. An excerpt is given here from Canto LII that shows a beautiful transformation of a Chinese calendar text into almost Hesiod-like metres; all the awful Jew-hating content from the beginning of that canto, so inconsistent with the following material, is nicely trimmed away. However, Pound's interest in the consequences of usury are still represented. Canto XLV, beginning "With usura hath no man a house of good stone", is one of the most striking poems of the work and did indeed have to be found here.

  • Few would claim that Ezra Pound's Cantos, taken in their entirety, are an unqualified success. As a sequence they lack any clearly discernible structure, and there is just too much in them that is obscure. At the same time, few would deny that they are studded throughout with passages of great force and beauty - brilliant lines, fragments, and even complete cantos which can be extracted from the complete text with little if any loss. One of these is what is perhaps Pound's greatest poem - his impassioned denunciation of 'Usura' : 'With Usura hath no man a house of good stone' - in Canto XLV. It is this canto, along with twenty-three others either in whole or in part, that will be found in the present book. These were selected largely by Pound himself, as he said, 'to provide the best introduction to the whole work for those coming to it for the first time.' Readers of poetry will find much to enjoy here, and some will probably be inspired to go on to a reading of the complete Cantos.
    Those who do so would be well advised to get hold of a copy of Carroll F. Terrell's 'A Companion to the Cantos of Ezra Pound' (University of California, 1993 printing), a reference work which contains glosses to Pound's numerous literary and historical allusions, identifications of all proper names and works, and translations of his foreign quotations. Those who become interested in the life of this extraordinary and colorful personality might consider taking a look at Humphrey Carpenter's 'A Serious Character : the Life of Ezra Pound' (Houghton Mifflin, 1988), a hugely entertaining and informative book which is perhaps the finest critical biography of Pound to have yet appeared and one which also helps considerably to elucidate many of Pound's obscurities.

  • If you like very much Pound's poetry, I really cannot advise you to buy this book. There is certainly great poetry inside it, (Canto XLV and LXXXI are among my favourites), but all the sense of continuity is dramatically lost in this selection. If you are interested in buying a good selection of Pound's Cantos in order to see how 'they look alike', I cannot advise you eihter another better selection than this. But remember, arriving at one Malatesta's Canto without knowing the history and development of the Banca del Paschi, or to arrive to the 'ed ascoltando al leggier mormorio' (Canto LXXXI) without any furhter refernce is like seeing 5 minutes of a very good 2 hour movie. Hence, this book is very good, but you can only expect from it 1/8 of the pleasure of reading the complete Cantos, as it only has 1/8 of its pages.