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by John Betjeman

ePub Continual Dew: A Little Book of Bourgeois Verse download
Author:
John Betjeman
ISBN13:
978-0719533952
ISBN:
0719533953
Language:
Publisher:
John Murray Publishers; New edition edition (August 25, 1977)
Category:
Subcategory:
Poetry
ePub file:
1383 kb
Fb2 file:
1135 kb
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Rating:
4.8
Votes:
841

Betjeman, John, Sir, 1906-.

Betjeman, John, Sir, 1906-. Books for People with Print Disabilities. Trent University Library Donation. Internet Archive Books. Uploaded by station27. cebu on May 25, 2019. SIMILAR ITEMS (based on metadata). Terms of Service (last updated 12/31/2014).

None of the other poems in Continual Dew have quite the same satirical tone as Slough, although some of them are humorous, such as A Hike on the Downs, in which two students plan a walking holiday around Winchester, A Public House Drunk and Dorset, a parody of Hardy’s (deeply serious) Friends Beyond. As in Mount Zion, Betjeman frequently deals with the subject of Christianity in its various manifestations.

Continual Dew, a Little Book of Bourgeois Verse. Privately printed, Chiselhampton. Subtitled Verses Turned in Aid of a Public Subscription towards the Restoration of the Church of St. Katherine, Chiselhampton. A Few Late Chrysanthemums. Westmeath Examiner, Mullingar, Ireland.

Continual Dew. A Little Book of Bourgeois Verse. London: John Murray, (1977). Thin octavo, original black cloth gilt, original dust jacket. Additionally inscribed by the publisher, "from an old and deep admirer, John Murray," and English broadcaster Michael Parkinson, "To a great superstar, with love and admiration, Michael Parkinson.

Continual Dew is Betjeman's second book of verse, containing perhaps his most famous poem 'Slough', as well as "The Arrest of Oscar Wilde at. .Items related to CONTINUAL DEW A Little Book of Bourgeois Verse.

Continual Dew is Betjeman's second book of verse, containing perhaps his most famous poem 'Slough', as well as "The Arrest of Oscar Wilde at Cadogan Hotel" and "The Wykehamist". Home BETJEMAN, John CONTINUAL DEW A Little Book of Bourgeois Verse. CONTINUAL DEW A Little Book of Bourgeois Verse. Published by Murray, 1937. From Jonkers Rare Books (Henley on Thames, OXON, United Kingdom).

Continual dew : a little book of bourgeois verse. Legal Information - Terms and Conditions.

Authors: Betjeman, John. Continual Dew: A Little Book of Bourgeois Verse. Country of Publication. Place of Publication. Title: Continual Dew: A Little Book of Bourgeois Verse. Publisher: John Murray Publishers.

Continual dew: A little book of bourgeois verse. Select Format: Hardcover. ISBN13:9780719533952.

Continual Dew: A Little Book of Bourgeois Verse, J. Murray (London), 1937. Under pseudonym Epsilon) Sir John Piers, Westmeath Examiner (Mullingar, Ireland), 1938

Continual Dew: A Little Book of Bourgeois Verse, J. Under pseudonym Epsilon) Sir John Piers, Westmeath Examiner (Mullingar, Ireland), 1938. Old Lights for New Chancels: Verses Topographical and Amatory, J. Murray, 1940. Slick but Not Streamlined: Poems and Short Pieces, selected and with an introduction by W. H. Auden, Doubleday, 1947. Selected Poems, compiled and with an introduction by John Sparrow, J. Murray, 1948. St. Katherine's Church, Chiselhampton, Oxfordshire: Verses Turned in Aid of a Public Subscription towards the Restoration of the Church of St. Katherine, Chiselhampton, 1950.

BETJEMAN, JOHN CONTINUAL DEW, A LITTLE BOOK OF BOURGEOIS VERSE London: 1937 8vo, on blue paper, four leaves of white tissue, illustrations, original cloth, upper cover stamped in gilt. Contact us. Contact Client Service. New York +1 212 636 2000.

45p cloth, dustjacket, edges gilt, blue paper, illustrations, ornamented initials, name in ink, fresh and clean: Facsimile reprint of 1st 1937 edition
  • This book is more than just 'Slough'!!! It is a delight and a joy to read. I had forgotten just what a delight it was.

  • “Continual Dew”, published in 1937, was Betjeman’s second volume of poetry after “Mount Zion”. Although these poems were written during the thirties, Auden’s “low dishonest decade”, few of them make any reference to the politics of the era. The only direct reference to current events is the poem “Death of King George V” in which Betjeman seems to be auditioning for the role of Poet Laureate, more than thirty years before he was officially appointed to that post. (Actually, it’s a better poem than his later official Laureate efforts to commemorate Royal events).

    The last line of that poem is “Where a young man lands hatless from the air”. The “young man” is the new King, Edward VIII, and he is presumably “hatless” as a mark of respect to his late father. Edward was not, in fact, particularly young at the time of his father’s death in January 1936. He would have been 41 at the time; Betjeman was only 29. Describing a middle-aged man twelve years older than himself as “young”, however, may have been part of Betjeman’s attempt to create for himself an older persona. In these poems he certainly comes across as an old head on young shoulders.

    The expression “young fogey” did not exist in the 1930s; it was invented in the 1980s to describe a group of then relatively youthful but socially conservative journalists and cultural commentators, mostly associated with “The Spectator” magazine. Betjeman, however, like his contemporary Evelyn Waugh, was a young fogey avant la lettre, a young man with socially conservative views and attitudes. It is notable that the original group of Young Fogeys from the eighties included, in addition to the likes of Charles Moore, Simon Heffer and Waugh’s son Auberon, two great Betjemanists, his biographer A N Wilson and the architectural writer Gavin Stamp.

    Probably the most famous poem included in this volume is “Slough”. With its opening line “Come friendly bombs and fall on Slough!” it is certainly the most notorious, at least in East Berkshire (or South Buckinghamshire as it would have been in the thirties). It is also the most political of the poems contained here, and one of the most fogeyish. Betjeman loathed Slough, an industrial town to the west of London, not just for its Modernist architecture, but for the way in which it seemed to encapsulate much of what he disliked about modern life- its Philistinism, its indifference to nature and its general conformism (“Tinned minds, tinned breath”). Social conservatism, however, does not always equate to political Conservatism, and Betjeman also calls for the bombs to strike down the town’s grasping capitalists but to spare their employees (“the bald young clerks who add The profits of the stinking cad”).

    None of the other poems in “Continual Dew” have quite the same satirical tone as “Slough”, although some of them are humorous, such as “A Hike on the Downs”, in which two students plan a walking holiday around Winchester, “A Public House Drunk” and “Dorset”, a parody of Hardy’s (deeply serious) “Friends Beyond”.

    As in “Mount Zion”, Betjeman frequently deals with the subject of Christianity in its various manifestations. His title is taken from the Matins service in the Book of Common Prayer, praying that God might pour upon His people “the continual dew of thy blessing”. Some of his poems on the subject, like “An Exchange of Livings” and “Our Padre”, are light-hearted, but in the oddly-named “Suicide on Junction Road Station after Abstention from Evening Communion in North London” he deals with the darker side of religion; this is a suicide motivated by feelings of religious guilt. Although Betjeman always claimed to be a High Anglican, he was fascinated by all Christian denominations, including fundamentalist Protestant sects, and this is reflected here in “Calvinistic Evensong” and “Undenominational”.

    When I reviewed “Mount Zion” I pointed out that, unusually for a volume of poems by a young man in his twenties, it did not contain any love poems. There is only one, “Love in a Valley”, in “Continual Dew”, and as that it written from the point of view of the woman it probably does not reflect Betjeman’s personal experience. It is, however, one of the best poems in this collection, describing how the woman and her lover, a naval officer, spend one last weekend together before he is posted abroad to China. Their rendezvous is at his home in a secluded valley in the Surrey Hills, and the poem is a good example of Betjeman’s ability to conjure up a sense of place, in this case the North Downs (an area I know well) in late autumn. This ability is shown in a number of other poems in the collection such as “Distant View of a Provincial Town”, in which the sight from a railway carriage of a town the poet once knew well conjures up feelings of nostalgia.

    “Love in a Valley” is written in an unusual metre, a combination of dactyls and trochees, seemingly emphasising the female narrator’s conflicting emotions, a mixture of joy in the present moment and sadness at her lover’s impending departure. Betjeman likes to experiment with rhythm; by no means all the poems are in iambic metre, that traditional staple of English verse. “The Arrest of Oscar Wilde at the Cadogan Hotel”, for example, is written in anapaestic metre, more commonly associated with light or humorous verse. That is possibly because, even though the poem deals with a serious subject, the arrest of a man on charges which were to see him sent to prison, there is a sort of grim humour in it, with Wilde’s effete world-weariness contrasting with the mixture of deference and officiousness exhibited by the policemen sent to arrest him.

    I felt that there were more unsuccessful poems here than in “Mount Zion”. Among the damp squibs I would count “Clash Went the Billiard Balls” (in which Betjeman unwisely tries to imitate a working-class voice), “The Heart of Thomas Hardy” and “Exeter”. (A line like “And a smiling corpse he made” does not really belong in any poem unless the tone is one of ironical black humour, which I do not think was the intention here. A contrived line like “Which was writ by A. Huxléy” should be left to the likes of McGonagall). Yet this higher failure rate is perhaps not surprising. A young poet selecting poems for his first published volume will probably play it safe; the same poet working on his second volume may feel a greater freedom to experiment, and not all his experiments will come off. Yet this process of experimentation was necessary to enable Betjeman to find his own authentic poetic voice, which comes through strongly in this volume.