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by Tony Hoagland

ePub What Narcissism Means to Me: Poems download
Author:
Tony Hoagland
ISBN13:
978-1555973865
ISBN:
1555973868
Language:
Publisher:
Graywolf Press (2003)
Category:
Subcategory:
Poetry
ePub file:
1678 kb
Fb2 file:
1524 kb
Other formats:
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Rating:
4.2
Votes:
438

Tony Hoagland revels in this struggle and honors it with What Narcissism Means To M. I had the wonderful pleasure of seeing Tony Hoagland read at a conference in Austin, TX, and I can say without exaggeration that it was one of the most inspiring events I've ever attended

6 people found this helpful. I had the wonderful pleasure of seeing Tony Hoagland read at a conference in Austin, TX, and I can say without exaggeration that it was one of the most inspiring events I've ever attended. It's a sad truth that at many writing conferences, one can experience almost as much disappointment as they do elation. With Hoagland, though, there's no need to worry.

Tony Hoagland’s poems in What Narcissism Means to Me shows us that poetry can still be possible during anytime period and enjoyed at any age. He reaches into society’s current topics and ideas and pulls out a real unapologetic interpretation. As the reader and an American, we secretly enjoy him calling us out.

I’ll get right to it: please support the Internet Archive today.

Anthony Dey Hoagland (November 19, 1953 – October 23, 2018) was an American poet. His poetry collection, What Narcissism Means to Me (2003), was a finalist for the National Book Critics Circle Award. His other honors included two grants from the National Endowment for the Arts, a 2000 Guggenheim Fellowship in Poetry, and a fellowship to the Provincetown Fine Arts Work Center

What narcissism "means" to Hoagland is that through self-adulation one can afford to be mean (without worrying about the grievances of others) and . The book’s first poems lay down Hoagland’s rules for reading the collection.

What narcissism "means" to Hoagland is that through self-adulation one can afford to be mean (without worrying about the grievances of others) and elicit truths that otherwise are avoided in society. But the flip side of this position is that meanness is the cause and consequence of isolation. A Commercial for a Summer Night," the opening poem, introduces readers to a handful of the poet’s elite friends

Tony Hoagland's disarming poetry collection What Narcissism Means to Me has the appeal of a mean-but-funny friend .

Tony Hoagland's disarming poetry collection What Narcissism Means to Me has the appeal of a mean-but-funny friend, a smart aleck you can't dismiss, he's so entertaining and (most of the time) so spot on in his insights. Hoagland's central subject is the self, specifically, a prickly, grandiose American masculine poetic self, or to be more specific still, what the author ruefully labels in one poem ''a government called Tony Hoagland.

More Poems by Tony Hoagland.

Reprinted with the permission of Graywolf Press, St. Paul, Minnesota, ww. raywolfpress. Source: What Narcissism Means to Me (Graywolf Press, 2003). More About this Poem. Cookouts, fireworks, and history lessons recounted in poems, articles, and audio. More Poems by Tony Hoagland. Wasteful Gesture Only Not. By Tony Hoagland.

What Narcissism Means to Me by Tony Hoagland, Paperback.

com find thousands of poems categorized into thousands of categories. What Narcissism Means to Me by Tony Hoagland, Paperback. Tony Hoagland with Application for Release from the Dream.

I enjoyed reading through his book What Narcissism Means to Me which was published in 2003. These poems all have traces of symbolism and great imagery as well

I enjoyed reading through his book What Narcissism Means to Me which was published in 2003. For this assignment I chose to write about America, How it Adds Up, and The Change. These poems all have traces of symbolism and great imagery as well. Hoagland, draws you in and keeps you interested in his wacky writing style. He makes you questions things, mostly about society and the way we are. America In this poem, the author uses America as symbolism

An eagerly awaited new collection of poems by contemporary favorite Tony Hoagland, author of Donkey Gospel

How did I come to believe in a government called Tony Hoagland?With an economy based on flattery and self-protection?and a sewage system of selective forgetting?and an extensive history of broken promises? --from "Argentina"

In What Narcissism Means to Me, award-winning poet Tony Hoagland levels his particular brand of acute irony not only on the personal life, but also on some provinces of American culture. In playful narratives, lyrical outbursts, and overheard conversations, Hoagland cruises the milieu, exploring the spiritual vacancies of American satisfaction. With humor, rich tonal complexity, and aggressive moral intelligence, these poems bring pity to our folly and celebrate our resilience.

  • What Narcissism Means To Me is an honest and artful way of presenting Tony Hoagland's world with certainty, sincerity and wit. His poems often are unyielding self-criticisms of his character as a whole, yet he manages to find the humor in the process and findings of his search. Hoagland's poems are bursting with personal details and introspection, yet while peering into the depths of his own psyche, he opens his observations up to the rest of our society. While examining the self, he wound up examining the universal themes of what it means to be an American today. It is not a necessarily a celebration of America; but rather an acknowledgement of Americans themselves which beg their own appreciation. The title is best explained in the poems "Narcissus Lullaby" and "What Narcissism Means To Me". In "Lullaby", Hoagland describes the joy of knowing (actually just suspecting) that someone is thinking about you. In "What Narcissism Means To Me", he compares self-love to hamburgers, "delicious but unhealthy, / or, depending on your perspective, / unhealthy but delicious." Hoagland would say if its narcissistic to want to be loved, then so be it - bring it on with all the calories, fat and grease - it tastes good. There is no shame or weakness in it; we are narcissistic beings and it is a statement of fact. Embrace those qualities that make us human rather than tear it apart as a character flaw. It is amazing what humans are capable of; living this life of constant struggle for beauty, art, and love. Tony Hoagland revels in this struggle and honors it with What Narcissism Means To Me.

  • Don't waste your money, get it on loan at library if you must. Very little substance, lacking in vivid imagery, and a bit self indulgent verse. You will be highly disappointed.

  • I was very pleasantly surprised with the eloquent simplicity of the verse in Tony Hoagland's, "What Narcissism Means to Me." Hoagland writes like people talk. His works are both easy to read and deep. You don't have to be an English Lit major to understand what he is communicating. In fact, I originally purchased this book for myself but after reading the first two pieces in the book, I gave a copy to a friend who neither reads or writes poetry because it reminded me of how he thinks/communicates himself, and he loved it immediately. I think this is not only poetry for the poet but the layman. This is poetry for people who think they don't like poetry. Excellent*****

  • Just a quick word to to say how much I love this collection.
    He seems to target our unconscious preciousness, our unwitting grandiosity and the delightfully ridiculous qualities we all exhibit without excluding himself. The subtle blend of accurate and casual is so disarming - you feel like you've spent time sitting on the bus next to a wise, melancholic wit rather than reading a collection of poems. Simply delightful.

  • Many adjectives have been lavished already on this book. Suffice it to say I enjoyed, I learned, I went back and read again, - Hoagland's voice occupied me for a few days - and I will never get over the brilliance and hilarity of the cover design.

  • I had the wonderful pleasure of seeing Tony Hoagland read at a conference in Austin, TX, and I can say without exaggeration that it was one of the most inspiring events I've ever attended. It's a sad truth that at many writing conferences, one can experience almost as much disappointment as they do elation. With Hoagland, though, there's no need to worry.

    Hoagland's work is gutsy, comical, dark yet hopeful, accessible, and tenacious in its quest to clarify the human experience. I immediately purchased all of Hoagland's books, and read each one almost straight through. While I'll admit that the first section of "What Narcissism Means to Me" doesn't, in my opinion, equal the poems in the three sections after, many of the poems in this book--especially "Suicide Song", "Windchime", and "Man Carrying Sofa"--are honestly some of the best poems I've ever read, bar none.

    Like all of Hoagland's work, I highly recommend this book!

  • Great little book. Best one of all of his, I think. But I'm nobody, and he sort of says he is too. :)

  • I first discovered Tony Hoagland on the Writers Almanac (my home page) in 2004 and have given all of his collections as special gifts to friends and myself ever since. Even favorite poems keep re-surprising me with their barbed sweetness and gut truths. No twist or turn-of-phrase goes quite where you'd guess. The humor and frankness make you think it's safe to follow these little poetic journeys (it's not). It takes an intimate knowledge of death's borders to make gallows humor so funny and sexuality so life affirming. Happy Day! Tony's published a new collection this summer! So I'm reviewing this while I order that. "What Narcissism Means to Me" is a fine place to start -- it's got a great cover to leave casually on the night stand or coffee table, and you'll find anywhere you open to has words spun into LEDs of pin prick light. Take "Spring Lemonade," "The Time Wars," or "On the CD I Buy for My Brother" - we've all been there (or there or there)as the observer or the observed but rarely so well.