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by Matthew Spencer,Michael Hofmann,Christopher Ricks

ePub Elected Friends: Robert Frost  Edward Thomas To One Another download
Author:
Matthew Spencer,Michael Hofmann,Christopher Ricks
ISBN13:
978-1590510834
ISBN:
1590510836
Language:
Publisher:
Other Press (February 17, 2004)
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Subcategory:
Poetry
ePub file:
1923 kb
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1126 kb
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4.9
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189

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Elected Friends Robert Frost & Edward Thomas to One Another. by Michael Hofmann, Christopher Ricks, Matthew Spencer. ISBN 13: 9781590515969. Format: Paperback (258 pages) Publisher: Other Press Published: 21 Aug 2012. Ashes for Breakfast: Selected Poems by Michael Hofmann, Durs Grunbein. Ashes for Breakfast: Selected Poems. by Michael Hofmann, Durs Grunbein.

Thomas himself had already championed Frost's own early work: These poems are revolutionary because they lack the . They reveal a warmth and charm that give us the key to the relationship between Frost and Thomas.

Thomas himself had already championed Frost's own early work: These poems are revolutionary because they lack the exaggeration of rhetoric. The metre avoids not only old fashioned pomp and sweetness, but the later fashion also of discord and fuss. Robert Frost and Edward Thomas met in a bookshop in London in 1913.

Thomas himself had already championed Frost's own early work: These poems are revolutionary because they lack .

Robert Frost and Edward Thomas met in a bookshop in London in 1913. Thomas himself had already championed Frost's early work

Robert Frost and Edward Thomas met in a bookshop in London in 1913. Thomas himself had already championed Frost's early work.

One is simple enough: the blankness with which I, as a graduate student, and every one of the thousand or so graduate students I have taught, first received the words "Edward Thomas. Since this is wrong, and dismaying, I try to have some fun with it.

Elected Friends: Robert Frost and Edward Thomas to one another, ed. by M. Spencer; foreword by M. Hofmann; afterword by Ch. Ricks. N. Other Press LLC, 2012. xlii+218 p. Hollis M. Now All Roads Lead to France: The Last Years of Edward Thomas. Faber & Faber, 2012. xviii+389 p. Kendall T. The Art of Robert Frost. New Haven - . Yale University Press, 2012. xvi+392 p. Kirkham M. The Imagination of Edward Thomas. Cambridge University Press, 2010. xii+225 p. Longley E. Under the Same Moon: Edward Thomas and the English Lyric. Enitharmon Press, 2017

Robert Frost and Edward Thomas met in a bookshop in London in 1913. Robert Frost and Edward Thomas: To One Another

Robert Frost and Edward Thomas met in a bookshop in London in 1913  . Robert Frost and Edward Thomas: To One Another.

Introduction by Matthew Spencer. Foreword by Michael Hofmann. Afterword by Christopher Ricks. List this Seller's Books. Payment Methods accepted by seller. Bookseller: Bookseller: Bauer Rare Books Address: San Diego, CA, . AbeBooks Bookseller Since: March 1, 2004.

Robert Frost and Edward Thomas met in a bookshop in London in 1913. During the next four years, the two writers—Frost, an unknown poet who had sold his farm in New Hampshire in order to take his family to England for one last gamble on poetry and Thomas, a sad literary journalist—formed the most important friendship between poets since that of Wordsworth and Coleridge. Their friendship only ended with Thomas' death in Arras, France, a casualty of the First World War. The story of Edward Thomas' turn to poetry, in fact, has been dominated by the account of Robert Frost's injunction: to break his existing prose into lines, bringing his musical cadence and his direct speaking voice into conversation with formal prosody. Thomas himself had already championed Frost's own early work: These poems are revolutionary because they lack the exaggeration of rhetoric.... Their language is free from the poetical words and forms that are the chief material of the secondary poets. The metre avoids not only old fashioned pomp and sweetness, but the later fashion also of discord and fuss. In fact the medium is common speech.... Mr. Frost has, in fact, gone back, as Whitman and as Wordsworth went back, through the paraphernalia of poetry into poetry once again.This book presents for the first time the full record, arranged chronologically, of what the poets wrote to, for, and about one another—their letters, poems, and Thomas' review of Frost's first two books. They reveal a warmth and charm that give us the key to the relationship between Frost and Thomas.
  • What a psychic link across the Pond, across the ages, across the vale of death ...

  • Too few Americans know that Frost had his first success as a poet in England, and that the English poet and literary journalist Edward Thomas contributed to that success.
    Frost called Thomas "the only brother I ever had." The two had many things in common, and they formed a close friendship from their first meeting in October 1913 until Thomas was killed in battle in France in April 1917. They took long walks together while Frost was living in Gloucestershire in 1914, and both wrote poems about this--Frost's "Iris by Night" and Thomas's "The sun used to shine."
    Thomas helped Frost refine his theories of "the sound of sense" and wrote reviews praising his second book, North of Boston. Frost prompted Thomas to discover his own poetic talent, and Thomas wrote over 140 poems in about two years, some of which--like "I Remember Adlestrop"--were loved and learned by generations of English schoolchildren.
    So this assembly of the surviving correspondence between the two offers readers some insight into the nature of the friendship, but holds disappointments as well. The editor, Matthew Spencer, offers no explanation for the surprising six-to-one imbalance of the letters in favor of Thomas, though available sources, including some in his bibliography, indicate that Thomas burned most of his correspondence before going to France. Nor does he provide an index, though the letters contain numerous references to well-known writers of the time. Spencer does outline the circumstances that led Frost to England, but he skips over the publication of Frost's first book, A Boy's Will. His account of Thomas's years of freelancing under a cloud of depression and the brief flourishing of his friendship with Frost may be a useful review for readers already acquainted with the story, but will hardly help newcomers understand the fragmented version of it in the letters.
    Michael Hofmann's Foreword and Christopher Ricks's Afterword might have provided helpful insight into the friendship, but these two writers choose instead to ride their own hobby-horses. Hofmann takes off on a weird psychosexual interpretation of the friendship, and Ricks entertains himself with a series of rhapsodies on the theme of Anglo-American rivalry, all the while noting that it doesn't apply to Frost and Thomas!
    There are much better sources for understanding the Frost-Thomas friendship, including Edward Thomas: The Last Four Years by Eleanor Farjeon and "The Only Begetter," a chapter in John Evangelist Walsh's Into My Own.

  • This was a touching and beautiful story about friendship told through letters and accounts. It shed some light on the writings of these two men and how their bond and mutual admiration helped shape them as great poets. Highly recommend this read!