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by Dorothy West

ePub The Richer, The Poorer download
Author:
Dorothy West
ISBN13:
978-0385471459
ISBN:
0385471459
Language:
Publisher:
Doubleday; 1st edition (June 1, 1995)
Category:
Subcategory:
Short Stories & Anthologies
ePub file:
1201 kb
Fb2 file:
1904 kb
Other formats:
rtf azw docx mbr
Rating:
4.2
Votes:
211

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Jack in the pot. Mammy. I first met Dorothy West in February 1980 when I went to the town of Oak Bluffs on Martha’s Vineyard, to interview her for an article I was writing on black women’s literary history. I was new to the East Coast, living in Cambridge, teaching at the University of Massachusetts in Boston-and not at all sure I wanted to stay in a place where one was constantly being judged by social class, by family background, by academic credentials.

Dorothy West founded the Harlem Renaissance literary magazine Challenge in 1934, and New Challenge in 1937, with Richard .

She was a welfare investigator and WPA relief worker in Harlem during the Depression. Her first novel, The Living Is Easy, appeared in 1948 and remains in print. Her second novel, The Wedding, was a national bestseller and literary landmark when published in the winter of 1995. A collection of her stories and autobiographical essays, The Richer, The Poorer, appeared during the summer of 1995.

A writer of huge compassion and acute observation, and also of dazzling style. Her work is more relevant than ever’ DIANA EVANS

A writer of huge compassion and acute observation, and also of dazzling style. Her work is more relevant than ever’ DIANA EVANS. An incredible collection of writing – both essays and short stories – spanning the long career of Dorothy West. Includes a new introduction by Diana Evans. The stories contained here are as American as jazz, and as wise and multifaceted as their writer.

They were rich with places and people, most of them lowly, all of them magnificent. Her face reflected her telling, the joys and sorrows of her remembering, and above all, the love she lived by that enhanced the poorest place, the humblest person

They were rich with places and people, most of them lowly, all of them magnificent. Her face reflected her telling, the joys and sorrows of her remembering, and above all, the love she lived by that enhanced the poorest place, the humblest person. Then it was that Lottie knew why Bess had made no mention of her finery, or the shining room, or the twelve-pound turkey. She had not even seen them.

Dorothy West (June 2, 1907 – August 16, 1998) was an American novelist and short-story writer during the time of the Harlem Renaissance. She is best known for her novel The Living Is Easy, as well as many other short stories and essays, about the life of an upper-class black family.

By Lance Eaton - December 16, 2014. Title: The Richer, The Poorer. Author: Dorothy West.

Short Story The Richer, The Poorer by Dorothy West. By Lance Eaton - December 16, 2014. As sisters, Lottie and Bess grew up together but learned different lessons. Lottie regularly nagged Bess to save and be careful with her money. Lottie saved everything and worked ceaseless to accrue more. By contrast Bess seemed to enjoy life and worry little about the future. As the year pass, Lottie never marries while Bess marries and goes off on various adventures.

West, Dorothy, 1907-1998. Books for People with Print Disabilities. Internet Archive Books. West, Dorothy, 1907-1998, African Americans, Authors, American, African American authors. New York : Doubleday. Uploaded by sf-loadersive. org on September 9, 2010. SIMILAR ITEMS (based on metadata). Terms of Service (last updated 12/31/2014).

The collected short stories and autobiographical writings of the last survivor of the Harlem Renaissance of the twenties and thirties describes growing up in Boston's black middle class, her relationship with Langston Hughes, and other subjects. 15,000 first printing.
  • I feel like this perception one has of this book very well might depend on whether the reader has ever attempted to write anything themselves. I had to buy this book for class and I am genuinely glad it was assigned. Even amongst other amazing writers, including Ida B, Wells, Octavia Butler, Maria Stewart and NK Jemisin, this book stands out to me. As an earlier reviewer stated, these stories only seem simple. Though they are indeed short, they are rich in detail and emotion. I would describe this book as dark, as many of the emotions explored in it are often a reflection of the worst of us when it comes to marriage and commitment. However, I loved it all! These stories varied in content and message, but the humanity in every single one of them was glaring and satisfying.

  • I picked this up due to a literature class assignment. It was cheaper than getting the textbook, and offered more insight into the author herself. Dorothy West was a great writer, she just doesn't quite align with my tastes for casual reading.

  • I gave this book a three because some of the short stories in this book are brutal and judgmental in nature.

  • A great book. Every one should read!

  • The packaging and shipping time was amazing!

  • I was born in the early 30 and life was hard but this book was so depressing that it never had a happy thought life was hard but we always had some happiness not all just down to bad she is so miserable that she never say any goodness of peoples.

  • Would-be writers would do well to read this collection of seemingly simple stories and sketches. It takes great talent and understanding to write such effortless, fluid prose. Once you've read the short stories, the reminiscences are a fascinating reflection of how an author mines her own life experiences to create art. As well, this pioneer of black literature has painted historical mini-portraits of life for so many people -- some of whom were born to slavery and freed within the author's own lifetime. It's too easy to forget that not so very long ago, black people weren't even considered citizens, but merely property. This is a lovely book, a prime example of elegantly simple writing. Highly recommended.

  • I have mixed feelings about Ms. West's novels. On the one hand, she writes remarkable well about the human condition and even her shortest stories translate into volumes in the mind. On the other hand Ms. West's constant references to skin color and class are contrived and nauseating. It make on e think that maybe she hated her own warm brown skin. These stories are interesting. Some are underdeveloped mostly because she was so very young when she penned them. It's a worthwhile book but it didn't make me a fan.