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by Matt Thorne,Borivoj Radakovic,Tony White

ePub Croatian Nights download
Author:
Matt Thorne,Borivoj Radakovic,Tony White
ISBN13:
978-1852428600
ISBN:
1852428600
Language:
Publisher:
Serpent's Tail; Main edition (July 1, 2005)
Category:
Subcategory:
Short Stories & Anthologies
ePub file:
1700 kb
Fb2 file:
1588 kb
Other formats:
txt mobi docx rtf
Rating:
4.7
Votes:
448

by Borivoj Radakovic (Author), Matt Thorne (Author), Tony White (Author).

by Borivoj Radakovic (Author), Matt Thorne (Author), Tony White (Author). Tony White (Author), Celia Hawkesworth (Translator) & 1 more.

For the last six years, the playwright and novelist Borivoj Radakovic has invited leading British writers to come to Croatia, and more recently to Serbia, and perform to huge audiences alongside the very best authors from the countries that make up the former Yugoslavia. The Festival of Alternative Culture ('FAK'; both a festival and a network of new writers and publishers) is legendary in Croatia and beyond, and now Croatian Nights celebrates the networks it has created.

Croatian Nights book. Start by marking Croatian Nights: A Festival of Alternative Literature as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

Best known for his novel Foxy-T (Faber, 2003), described by Toby Litt in 2006 as his 'favourite British novel from the past ten years', White has been called a 'serious, engaging voice of the modern city'.

For the last six years, the playwright and novelist Borivoj Radakovic has invited leading British writers to. . With contributors: Zoran Feric, Vladimir Arsenijevic, Borivoj Radakovic, Ben Richards, Anna Davis, Toby Litt, Niall Griffiths, John Williams, Nicholas Blincoe, JELENA CARIJA, SALENA ‘SALIVA’ GODDEN, MILJENKO JERGOVIC, GORDAN NUHANOVIC, EDO POPOVIC, ZORICA RADAKOVIC, MATT THORNE, GORAN TRIBUSON, TONY WHITE.

Published by Serpent's Tail (2005)

Published by Serpent's Tail (2005). ISBN 10: 1852428600 ISBN 13: 9781852428600.

For the last six years, the playwright and novelist Borivoj Radakovic has invited leading British writers to come to Croatia and . Croatian Nights : A Festival of Alternative Literature.

For the last six years, the playwright and novelist Borivoj Radakovic has invited leading British writers to come to Croatia and perform to huge audiences at th.

The former all set their work in Croatia and invariably send up the rich seam of prejudice and arrogance that springs from England's history as a colonial power and that defines the popular image of an Englishman abroad: no more vibrantly so than in Niall Griffiths's surreal satire Split.

For the last six years, the playwright and novelist Borivoj Radakovic has invited leading British writers to come to Croatia and perform to huge audiences at the Festival of Alternative Culture. The stories in Croatian Nights capture the true spirit of this extraordinary part of the world, which is fast becoming a hip tourist destination. Contributors include Borivoj Radakovic, Zoran Feric, Vladimir Arsenijevic, Ben Richards, Anna Davis, Toby Litt, Niall Griffiths, John Williams and Nicholas Blincoe.

  • I bought this book because my one of my favorite authors, Niall Griffiths, wrote one of the short stories in this collection. He's written some really funny/sick sick stories in the past, but this was one worth leaving unpublished.

    Most of the stories in this book felt like they were 100 page stories cropped to 10. There were also no paradigm shifts in any of the stories that can make them so much fun.

    The highlight (if it can be called that) was a story about someone setting up an MMA (mixed martial arts) organization in Croatia. The story wasn't spectacular, but it's the first fictional story I've read or heard about that involved MMA.

  • I picked this anthology up because I've enjoyed the work of several of the British contributors (especially Ben Richards, Tony White, and John Williams) and also because I spent a few weeks in Croatia on my honeymoon, traveling up the Dalmatian coast. Since that trip, I've been curious as to what kind of fiction is coming out of the new Croatia, so this collection of "alternative literature" written during 2003-2004 seemed to fit the bill. The slim, 200 page book contains 19 stories contributed by nine British and nine Croatian writers (most of whom had not previously had any work translated into English).

    The literary festival which gave birth to this collaboration is notably anti-nationalist in tone, and thus the stories are generally dark slices of life that steer clear of any explicit political or historical material. While this is an admirable separation of art and politics, it also has the effect of somewhat diluting the stories' setting. Only Niall Griffiths and Ben Richard's stories give the reader any true sense of place. In general, the Croatian stories tend to be rather domestic affairs, about relationships, family, and sex. They're not bad, but they feel like they could have come out of almost any urban writer's workshop in the world. Without broader cultural knowledge or context from the reader, there's little that makes them notably "Croatian" -- which is perhaps the point.

    The British stories tend to skew toward the writer-as-tourist variety, as (perhaps wisely) they tend to provide the perspective of the Englishperson just passing through. Protagonists include former Education Minister, has-been punk musician, lone traveler, middle-class tourist couple, single father with son, female writer, nondescript tourist, and two couples traveling together. While these are all generally well-written vignettes, the protagonists' experiences are again not particularly specific to Croatia. And it's somewhat disappointing that almost all of the stories are set in Zagreb (Niall Griffiths' story "Split" is set in the city of the same name).

    Overall, it's a decent middle-of-the-road collection with no terrible stories, but few memorable ones either. Toby Litt's "The Tourist" is a Gogolesque piece notable for its contrast in tone to the rest of the anthology. John Williams brings his musical perspective to bear in "The Ballad of Mott the Hoople", which captures the emptiness of being on tour well after one's glory years. Jelena Carija's "Junk Food Kills, Doesn't It?" is a scary, and yet empowering, story of a confrontation between a lout and two women. Goran Tribuson's "Ultimate Fighting" is a very funny piece about a hapless returnee's attempt to start an mixed martial arts club. Those interested in modern Croatian literature can check out the four books available in English from contributors to this anthology: Vladimir Arsenijevic's "In the Hold", Miljenko Jergovic's "Sarajevo Marlboro", Gordan Nuhanovic's "Survival League", and Edo Popovic's "Zagreb, Exit South".