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by Ali Smith

ePub The First Person and Other Stories download
Author:
Ali Smith
ISBN13:
978-0307454850
ISBN:
0307454851
Language:
Publisher:
Anchor (January 12, 2010)
Category:
Subcategory:
Short Stories & Anthologies
ePub file:
1173 kb
Fb2 file:
1144 kb
Other formats:
lrf lrf txt doc
Rating:
4.9
Votes:
823

Home Ali Smith The First Person and Other Stories.

Home Ali Smith The First Person and Other Stories. The first person and ot. .The First Person and Other Stories, . 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12. the first person and. other stories. It was published by Prospect in December 2005 and has been slightly updated for inclusion in this collection.

Splendid stories from Ali Smith. Not a dud in the bunch. Whether this book will be the one recommended to new readers of her work is another question. Smith plays with the short story form, at times unsuccessfully. Her opening story, "True Short Story," is what the title says - a true short story. The narrator overhears two men, possibly father and son, discussing literature.

This book by Ali Smith turns out to have quite brilliant stories and this is just one of them. There are some which are not as good as this one, but it’s really worth going through them to get to read the others

This book by Ali Smith turns out to have quite brilliant stories and this is just one of them. There are some which are not as good as this one, but it’s really worth going through them to get to read the others. she is just the kind of author I like to read.

Hurrah for Ali Smith. Innovative, sophisticated and intelligent, The First Person and Other Stories effortlessly appeals to our hearts, heads and funny bones in equal measure

Hurrah for Ali Smith. A bold and brilliant collection of stories by a writer unafraid to give it to us as it is' The Times. A middle-aged woman conducts a poignant conversation with her gauche fourteen-year-old self. An innocent supermarket shopper finds in her trolley a foul-mouthed, insulting and beautiful child. Innovative, sophisticated and intelligent, The First Person and Other Stories effortlessly appeals to our hearts, heads and funny bones in equal measure. One-of-a-kind Ali Smith and the short story are made for each other.

The First Person, her fourth and latest collection, opens with a piece called "True Short Story" that was apparently .

By putting the characters who stand in for the real-life Ali Smith and her friend Kasia Boddy into a fictional frame, Smith also points up her title's ambiguity: does it mean a story that's strictly factual, one that achieves a less literal kind of truth, or one that's true to the nature of the form?

Other projects First-person narrative - is a narrative mode in which a story is narrated by one character, who explicitly refers to him or herself in the first person, that is, using words.

Ali Smith partnered with the Scottish band Trashcan Sinatras and wrote the lyrics to a song called "Half An Apple", a simple, bittersweet love song about keeping half an apple spare for a loved one who is gone.

In Astute Fiery Luxurious, a misdelivered package throws the life of a couple into disarray

In Astute Fiery Luxurious, a misdelivered package throws the life of a couple into disarray. A boy's unexplained illness in I Know Something You Don't Know drives his mother to seek guidance from homeopathic healers, with inconclusive results. In The Child, an unnervingly mature young boy voices offensive humour that genteel society would rather not acknowledge. And a confident older woman meets her awkward fourteen-year-old self.

The First Person and Other Stories is the fourth collection of short stories by Ali Smith. The First Person and Other Stories effortlessly appeals to our hearts, heads and funny bones. Always intellectually playful, but also very moving and funny, Smith explores the ways and whys of storytelling. In one, a middle-aged woman conducts a poignant conversation with her gauche fourteen-year-old self. In another, an innocent supermarket shopper finds in her trolley a foul-mouthed, insulting and beautiful child.

The First Person and Other Stories is a short story collection by Scottish Booker-shortlisted author Ali Smith, first published in 2008. It contains 12 stories :-. "True Short Story" A discussion between two men in a cafe discussing the relative merits of novels and short stories is overheard. The narrator (named Ali) rings a friend and continues the argument quoting the views of various authors and the story of Echo and Narcissus from Greek mythology.

From the Whitbread Award-winning author of The Accidental and Hotel World comes this stunning collection of stories set in a world of everyday dislocation, where people nevertheless find connection, mystery, and love. These tales are of ordinary but poignant beauty: at the pub, strangers regale each other with memories of Christmases past; lovers share tales over dinner about how they met, their former lovers, and each other; a woman even tells a story to her fourteen-year-old self. As Smith explores the subtle links between what we know and what we feel, she creates an exuberant, masterly collection that is packed full of ideas, humor, nuance, and compassion.  Ali Smith and the short story are made for each other.
  • Splendid stories from Ali Smith. Not a dud in the bunch. What a magnificent imagination! I've given copies to most of my friends, I love it so much.

  • Ali Smith's world is at times bleak and lonely, at times rich and full, but in all cases a different take on life than we usually see. Smith has garnered a strong following in her short career, and this new Anchor books edition of The First Person and Other Stories solidifies the fact that she is a voice we will continue to hear from. Whether this book will be the one recommended to new readers of her work is another question.

    Smith plays with the short story form, at times unsuccessfully. Her opening story, "True Short Story," is what the title says -- a true short story. The narrator overhears two men, possibly father and son, discussing literature. Their thinking drives the narrator to talk to her literary friend, battling cancer, to discuss if the short story is truly a slim nymph as described by the younger of the two men. But the story sounds more like a memoir than a short story, which is ironic since the story is a celebration of the short story.

    But when she succeeds Smith proves she is worth the patience. "The Child" features a foul-mouthed, talking baby who simply shows up in the narrator's shopping cart one day. Despite her resistance to what is perhaps things to come, she finds herself drawn into caring for the sexist, racist, angelic-looking child. But in the end she finds another way to solve her problem.

    While "The Child" features resolution, Smith is comfortable not finishing the story. Many of the selections show us the modern "slice-of-life" snippets, but they are not without future direction. Smith differs from many contemporary writers in that some of the stories have hope built in them as well. In "The Second Person" we watch a couple fight their way into separation, but in the end an accordion and its missing mate indicate a renewal of the relationship.

    The eponymous final story is a touching love story in which one of the characters works hard to convince herself that her new relationship is nothing special. Her lover is not discouraged.

    "You're not the first person who ever made me feel like this, you know, I say.
    I'm the first person today, though, you say."

    The passage is indicative of Smith's thinking, a focus on living in the present. It also shows hers fondness for quoting her characters with "I say -- you say -- he said -- she said" phrases as opposed to direct quotes. At times it can be confusing on who is speaking, but Smith is likely intentional here. She also often leaves genders, especially in relationships, unspoken. How the reader interprets these stories may say as much about them as Smith.

    Overall we see Smith experimenting with the short story form, and like most experiments there are both failures and successes. But like most experiments, they are worth the effort.

  • It takes great skill to balance something surreal with the reality of person and place. Ali Smith does that expertly in her new collection, The First Person and Other Stories. I laughed aloud when I read "The Child," in which a toddler looks one way and acts quite another. Smith's cleverness and sense of the surreal appears in "Fidelio and Bess" when the characters Porgy & Bess begin to spear in Beethoven's Fidelio. In "Writ" a woman is visited by her teenage self. Strange and surreal, but as with each story, used in a way that leads to reality and to an understanding of our humanity. If you're interested in short stories, consider reading the finely crafted ones in The First Person.

    Rating: Three-star (Recommended)