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by Shmuel Yosef Agnon

ePub A Book That Was Lost: And Other Stories download
Author:
Shmuel Yosef Agnon
ISBN13:
978-0805241204
ISBN:
0805241205
Language:
Publisher:
Schocken; 1st edition (April 25, 1995)
Category:
Subcategory:
Short Stories & Anthologies
ePub file:
1605 kb
Fb2 file:
1725 kb
Other formats:
lrf lit txt mbr
Rating:
4.6
Votes:
902

Short Stories & Anthologies.

Short Stories & Anthologies. This collection of stories by SY Agnon is interspersed with essays that illuminate how the stories are framed by his life. Born in Buzcazc in Galicia (the section of Poland ruled by Austria), Agnon made aliyah as a young man and settled in Tel Aviv. He returned to Germany to study European literature and then returned to Israel and spent the rest of his life in Jerusalem. The stories take place in Europe and Israel.

Shmuel Yosef Agnon was born Shmuel Yosef Halevi Czaczkes in 1888 in Galicia, Austria-Hungary (now Poland). He received training in Yiddish, Hebrew and the Talmud from his father, and was introduced to German literature by his mother

Shmuel Yosef Agnon was born Shmuel Yosef Halevi Czaczkes in 1888 in Galicia, Austria-Hungary (now Poland). He received training in Yiddish, Hebrew and the Talmud from his father, and was introduced to German literature by his mother. When he was fifteen, his first poems, written in Yiddish and Hebrew, were published in the newspaper. He took his pen name, later his legal name, . Agnon, from the title of his first story Agunot, published in 1909. He lived and worked in Palestine from 1907 until his death in 1970, except for an eleven year stay in Germany.

Includes bibliographical references

Includes bibliographical references. The Signature Story : Agunot - Tales of Childhood : The kerchief - Two pairs - The Artist in the Land of Israel: Hill of sand - Knots upon knots - A book that was lost - On one stone - The sense of smell - From lodging to lodging - The Ancestral World : The tale.

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A Book that Was Lost. A Reader’s Preface Agnon’s stories stirred very strong, disturbing feelings in m. It’s been instructive for me to discover how uncomfortable Agnon seems to have made other Jewish writers. For my Bar Mitzvah, a friend of my parents, a Jewish writer, gave me a small bundle of books that included a collection of Agnon tales. In those days I did not wonder much about the authors of the books I read. Agnon’s stories stirred very strong, disturbing feelings in me. Looking back, I recognize these emotions as tinged with nascent historical and religious and political awakening, though I didn’t recognize or have a name for this at the time.

A Book That Was Lost and Paths of Righteousness, or The Vinegar . He was also the author of a vast array of other books. Agnon was born Shmuel Yosef Halevi Czaczkes in Buczacz, Eastern Galicia.

A Book That Was Lost and Paths of Righteousness, or The Vinegar Maker, translated by Amiel Gurt. First published in Ariel 45–46 (1978). Reprinted by permission of the publisher and the translator. Anne Golomb Hoffman is Professor of English and Comparative Literature at Fordham University and author of Between Exile and Return: . Agnon and the Drama of Writing (SUNY Press, 1991) as well as many articles on Agnon and other writers of modern Hebrew fiction.

Shmuel Yosef Halevi Czaczkes (later Agnon) was born in Buczacz (Polish spelling, pronounced Buchach) or Butschatsch (German spelling), Polish Galicia (then within the . A Book That Was Lost: Thirty Five Stories (2008).

Shmuel Yosef Halevi Czaczkes (later Agnon) was born in Buczacz (Polish spelling, pronounced Buchach) or Butschatsch (German spelling), Polish Galicia (then within the Austro-Hungarian Empire), now Buchach, Ukraine. In 1977 the Hebrew University published Yiddish Works, a collection of stories and poems that Agnon wrote in Yiddish during 1903–1906. Jewish vegetarianism.

Agnon published 24 volumes of novels, novellas and short stories. The Collected Works of . A Book That Was Lost : And Other Stories. Agnon was published by Schocken in eight volumes between 1953-62, updated with the 11 works that appeared posthumously. Books in Translation: Some 85 of . A complete bibliography is in preparation and will be published in book form by The Institute for the Translation of Hebrew Literature. A dwelling place of my people : sixteen stories of the Chassidim. Scottish Academic Press, No Date. A Guest for the Night.

Hildesheim : Georg Olms Verlag, 1980. Shaked, Gershon, Shmuel Yosef Agnon : a Revolutionary Traditionalist, translated by Jeffrey M. Green.

New York : Schoken, 1995. Agnon’s Alef bet : Poems, translated by Robert Friend ; illustrated by Arieh Zeldich. Hildesheim : Georg Olms Verlag, 1980. New York : New York University Press, 1989. Ben-Dov, Nitza, Agnon’s Art of Indirection : Uncovering Latent Content in the Fiction of S. Y. Agnon. Leiden : Brill, 1993. Oz, Amos, The Silence of Heaven : Agnon’s Fear of God, translated from the Hebrew by Barbara Harshaw.

Books from this series. A Book That Was Lost: Thirty-Five Stories. Two Scholars That Were in Our Town and Other Novellas. Two Tales: Betrothed & Edo and Enam. The Book of State: Agnon’s Political Satires (forthcoming).

Awarded the Nobel Prize in Literature in 1966, S. Y. Agnon is considered the towering genius of modern Hebrew literature for his hard-edged modernism and soft-hued imagery. With this new collection of stories, the English-speaking audience has, at long last, access to the rich and brilliantly multifaceted fictional world of one of the great writers of this century.These stories span the lifetime of a quintessential wandering Jew - born in Buczacz, Poland, living in Germany, and finally settling in Jerusalem - and they bring to life the full gamut of the modern Jewish experience in fiction.This broad selection of Agnon's fiction introduces the full sweep of the writer's panoramic vision as chronicler of the lost world of Eastern European Jewry and the emerging society of modern Israel. Here are stories that portray the richly textured culture of traditional Jewish life in Poland, as well as changes in the life of the community over time.Several stories reflect on the Jewish infatuation with German and Western culture in the interwar period: "On the Road," for example, narrates an eerie encounter on the eve of a holy day between an itinerant Jew and a ghostly company of martyred Jews from the Crusades. The early years of Jewish settlement in the land of Israel are recalled in "Hill of Sand," which is also a revealing portrait of the artist as a young man; "A Book That Was Lost" is a powerful metaphor for the writer's own journey from Buczacz to Jerusalem.
  • This collection of stories by SY Agnon is interspersed with essays that illuminate how the stories are framed by his life. Born in Buzcazc in Galicia (the section of Poland ruled by Austria), Agnon made aliyah as a young man and settled in Tel Aviv. He returned to Germany to study European literature and then returned to Israel and spent the rest of his life in Jerusalem. The stories take place in Europe and Israel. A few are somewhat autobiographical, but most are part dream and part legend. The influence of Kafka is evident, as is that of Talmudic midrash, but these stories are different from anything else. Agnon's references are based in Jewish culture and history -- not that the hitory is accurate -- but these are not about real history; they are about history as transformed by the imagination, and Agnon's imagination is infinite.

    However, I hated the electronic form of the book and ended up buying a hard copy. The hypertexting features of the Kindle are limited, but the hypertexting fin this book is useless. Stories are listed by translators, rather than by title, which makes it difficult to find anything without paging through the book. In the print book there is a table of contents by title, so I don't know why the Kindle version is so clumsy.

  • Fascinating book of fact, fiction & history.

  • I have read the English translation, and love it. Agnon's mystical surrealism is worthy of Garcia-Marquez. While being versed in Jewish traditions can be helpful, it is not necessary for appreciating this brilliant writer.

  • Agnon is an intriguing writer. The reader would have to know things about Judaism, but there is a glossary that is helpful. It is not really an easy read although it is easy on a superficial level, but there are many levels more.

  • This is a collection of short stories that bring life to a bygone time of Jewish life.

  • Great condition and very usable! Thank you!

  • How does one describe the Nobel Prize winner for literature? His work is great. I remember when I was studying the works of Agnon in graduate school that I was told that in Israel, while he was alive, he was so respected that the Israeli government placed a sign in the street where he lived that said: Please be quiet. Agnon is working.
    I remember also the professor saying that many of his stories have an almost mystical underpinning. It is like a man walking across a bridge as people normally do, and slowly he begins to rise and float in the air the rest of the way.
    This book contains 25 superb stories. In the first, “Agunot,” for example, he tells about the impact of song upon a person. It is a love story that only Agnon could write. In “A Book that was Lost,” he tells about a man who wrote a beautiful commentary on a commentary on the Talmud who mistakenly thought that what he wrote was already said by another man. So, although he spent 12 years on his book he did not publish it. Years later, it was discovered. Agnon tells what happened next. In “The Sign,” he tells about the impact upon a man who now lives in Israel, who hears on the eve of a happy Jewish holiday that the Nazis had just destroyed his hometown in Europe and killed the people he knew. He is visited at the end of the tale by a famous poet, a man whose poetry he read every year on this holiday, who has been dead for centuries. This is when the story leaves the bridge and soars.
    True, the book is filled with references to Judaism and Jewish customs, but it can be enjoyed by everyone. That’s why he won the prize.

  • This volume contains twenty-five stories by the 1966 Nobel Prize in Literature winner S. Y. Agnon (1888-1970). As Amos Oz, another famous writer, stated: "Deviously disguised as an old fashion storyteller with a sagely, scriptural style, Agnon is actually one of the most fascinating metaphysical poets of this century." This collection offers readers a good sampling of the writings of this magnificent author.