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ePub Storyteller download

by Amy Thomson

ePub Storyteller download
Author:
Amy Thomson
ISBN13:
978-0441010943
ISBN:
0441010946
Language:
Publisher:
Ace Trade; 1 edition (December 2, 2003)
Category:
Subcategory:
United States
ePub file:
1856 kb
Fb2 file:
1893 kb
Other formats:
doc mobi txt mbr
Rating:
4.9
Votes:
758

FREE shipping on qualifying offers. On the planet of Thalassa, a world in which history is chronicled from one generation to the next by Storytellers.

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It's easy to see why Amy Thomson has won prestigious awards

It's easy to see why Amy Thomson has won prestigious awards. This book brings to mind a quote from Lao Tzu: Being loved deeply by some one give you strength; It is like Heinlein's Citizen of the Galaxy as the cover on my copy claims, but for me it was more like the stories of Ursula Le Guin. I thought it was very well done. It's a book of caring deeply about someone in particular and for others in general.

Storyteller is a book by Amy Thomson published in 2003 by Ace Books. In contrast to her earlier books which were very hard science fiction Storyteller was much more romantic, the novel focuses on themes such as longevity and environmentalism ignoring technological focus.

Used availability for Amy Thomson's Storyteller. January 2005 : USA Mass Market Paperback.

Thomson Amy. Download (lit, 410 Kb). Epub FB2 PDF mobi txt RTF. Converted file can differ from the original. If possible, download the file in its original format.

Title: Storyteller Author: Amy Thomson Publisher: Ace Format: Paperback ISBN-10: 0441012566 Description: National bestselling and Joseph W. Campbell Award-winning author. On Thalassa, storytelling is Teller's life

Title: Storyteller Author: Amy Thomson Publisher: Ace Format: Paperback ISBN-10: 0441012566 Description: National bestselling and Joseph W. On Thalassa, storytelling is Teller's life. With the great sea-beast to whom she is telepathically bonded, she travels Thalassa's many oceans.

Amy Thomson Art, Newcastle upon Tyne. I do get fully booked for pencil portraits. I only have a small handful of guaranteed slots remaining then I have to start a waiting list, so please drop me a message ASAP if you were hoping to gift a Pencil Portrait this Christmas! A x.

Finding books BookSee BookSee - Download books for free. Thomson Amy. Category: fiction. 410 Kb. The Color of Distance. Category: Научная Фантастика.

On the planet of Thalassa, a world in which history is chronicled from one generation to the next by Storytellers, one woman who calls herself Teller has a profound impact on the life of Samad, a young street boy who has become apprenticed to her.
  • Humanity has come the the planet Thalassa, but they are not the only sentient beings living there. The acquatic, telepathic harsel live in the oceans. How both come to live together in a harmony as rare as it is wonderful, is this fine story of choices, the choices humankind must make to live in peace out among the stars, to the inner choices we all make. A fine story, beautifully done, I highly recommend it

  • This is a wonderful tale of love, acceptance, and family, whether it be between humans or between humans and another species. Although set in the future when humans have colonized other planets, the story is very relatable. It demonstrates how humans can live in harmony with the natural world. This harmony is achieved, initially, through the efforts of one human woman (Teller) and one of the harsels (sentient aquatic species), and is maintained by Teller and thousands of others (human and harsel) who understand the value of living in harmony.

    My only complaint about the book is Thomson's failure to have Teller counsel her adopted son about safe sex when he becomes sexually active. Teller never tells him to be careful where he goes, who he has sex with, or to practice safe sex. There is no excuse for this omission.

  • Ms. Thomson is one of the greatest world builders I've read. The people, or beings, who inhabit her planets are wonderful. This book is no exception.

    The world of Thalassa is even more of a water world than our Earth. It is metal-poor, and when people first arrive, they end up bonding with the large "fish" that swim in the oceans, the harsel. Hars are telepathic, to those who can hear, and they not only learn words, but communicate in song. They have giant holds in their bodies for specially built pods to carry their humans and cargo as they ply the oceans.

    The bonds between a har captain (the human) and the har and strong and life-long.

    Teller, a master storyteller who travels Thalassa telling stories, teaching the history of the planet, while keeping a secret meets and rescues a young orphan, Samad. Teller plans to find him a good family, but he sees it as being thrown away by this woman who tells stories, and refuses to let her go without him.

    Teller has a har, Abeha, who also bonds with Samad. They both have their reasons for bonding with Samad, and neither thinks to ask what he wants. And as he becomes an adult, there are the inevitable clashes between adults and child.

    There is a portion of the book which may bother some, but I think Ms. Thomson handled it well, with sensitivity and grace. Samad is homosexual. The most important aspect of that portion of the book is how it confuses him, and how when his mother, Teller, finds out, she is totally accepting. Frankly, I thought it was well handled, and such a small portion of the book barely worth mentioning; however, I know there are those out there in Reader Land who may have a different view than I on the subject.

    I whole-heartedly recommend this book for anyone who enjoys a good fantasy novel. It is not an adrenalin gusher, it is thoughtful, delightful, there are places where I used a hanky (or three), and there are places where I not only chuckled, but also laughed out loud. A truly fun book.

  • It is like Heinlein's Citizen of the Galaxy as the cover on my copy claims, but for me it was more like the stories of Ursula Le Guin. I thought it was very well done. It's a book of caring deeply about someone in particular and for others in general. I'm sorry for those who reviewed this book and weren't able to see the beauty I saw in it. It's easy to see why Amy Thomson has won prestigious awards. This book brings to mind a quote from Lao Tzu: Being loved deeply by some one give you strength; Loving someone deeply gives you courage.

  • I was hesitant as I started the book - it shuffled along at a halting pace for the first chapter or so as histories and characters were laid out. Once the strong voice of Teller was established, however, the book sailed along cleanly.

    The myth of The Pilot, the life of Teller and her adopted son, Samad - all revolving around choices and growth - moved me immensely. Surviving great losses being a central theme to the book - the sort of losses that all involved see no way through and yet years later can look back at with a realization of a passage or a lesson learned.

    Amy Thomson handles all of this with extreme care - the tender relationship that grows fiercely personal between Teller and Samad, Teller's long-time lover, Florio, the people that both Samad and Teller interact with.

    I agree with another reviewer, however, that Thomson really dumps the emotional growth side of Samad's sexuality right into the gutter. Samad's homosexuality is a casual jibe between he and Teller, a thing that happens after dark at shipyards and parks and fast - a thing that fades in the day.

    Some part of that might be a growth process for Samad - wild, reckless and unwilling to form long-term relationships with others outside of his 'family' and perhaps at the close of the book the mature Samad who begins to find his own voice and way in the world of Thalassa & harsels will be the Samad who also develops lasting relationships with other men - perhaps.

    But this is just a tic of the book - and should not distract from the central message and themes. This book was cathartic for me and had me a bit emotional (happy & sad) as the book drew the its end and sailed away into the sunset.